January 2008 Briefing - Ophthalmology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for January 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Erythropoietin Effective in Mouse Retinopathy

MONDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Erythropoietin can be an effective therapy in mice for diseases involving neurovascular damage such as retinopathy, but treatment timing is important, according to a report in the February issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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N-myc Gene Regulates Retinal Cell Proliferation

FRIDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The N-myc gene plays an important role in retinal progenitor cell proliferation in the developing retina, and appears to coordinate retinal and eye growth, according to an article published in the Jan. 15 issue of Genes & Development.

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Estrogen Receptor Gene Variants Raise Glaucoma Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in an estrogen receptor gene more than triple the risk of developing open-angle glaucoma in men, but do not affect the risk in women, according to a report published in the January issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Carotenoids, Vitamin E May Lower Cataract Risk in Women

THURSDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A high dietary intake of the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, as well as vitamin E from food and supplements, may lower the risk of cataracts in women, researchers report in the January issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Smoking Raises Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking not only appears to increase the risk of developing early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but also increases the likelihood of progression to late-stage disease, researchers report in an article published in the January issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Physician's Briefing