July 2011 Briefing - Ophthalmology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for July 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Intensive Glycemic Control Does Not Improve Renal Outcome

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- In older patients with type 2 diabetes, intensive glycemic control does not improve renal disease progression, but it is associated with reduction in nephropathy progression in patients with worse microvascular eye disease, higher body mass index (BMI), and lower diastolic blood pressure (DBP), according to a study published online July 20 in Diabetes Care.

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Smart Phone Text Is Read Closer to Eye Than Hardcopy

MONDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- The mean font size of text messages and Web pages on handheld electronic devices is comparable with newspaper print but the mean working distance is closer than the typical near-working distance when viewing hardcopy text, according to a study published in the July issue of Optometry and Vision Science.

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NICE: Ranibizumab Not Advised for Diabetic Macular Edema

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.K. National Institute for Health and Clinical Experience (NICE) announced in final draft guidance issued July 15 that the organization is not recommending ranibizumab for the treatment of diabetic macular edema.

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Histopathologic Complications Seen Post-Intra-Arterial Chemo

WEDNESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Though retinoblastoma can be controlled by intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC), histopathology demonstrates that ocular complications, including thromboembolic events, can occur, according to a study published online July 11 in the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Older Children Less Responsive to Treatment for Amblyopia

TUESDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Children aged 7 to less than 13 years of age are significantly less responsive to treatment for moderate and severe amblyopia than younger children, according to a meta-analysis published online July 11 in the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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