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May 2011 Briefing - Ophthalmology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for May 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Effect Estimates May Be Inflated in Biomarker Studies

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Biomarker effects are often overestimated in highly cited studies compared to the effects reported in subsequent meta-analyses of the same associations, according to a review published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Contact With Drug Industry Linked to Positive Attitudes

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- The extent of contact that medical students have with the pharmaceutical industry is associated with positive attitudes about marketing, according to a review published online May 24 in PLoS Medicine.

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Erectile Dysfunction Linked to Diabetic Retinopathy

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Significant erectile dysfunction (ED) is associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) severity, independent of age, diabetes duration, macrovascular comorbidities, and cardiovascular risk factors, according to a study published in the May issue of Urology.

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Many Medical Students Lack Confidence in Medical Law

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of medical students lack confidence in their knowledge and skills across many areas of medical law, according to a study published online May 16 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Selenium May Improve Graves' Orbitopathy Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of patients with mild Graves' orbitopathy with selenium may improve quality of life, reduce ocular involvement, and slow disease progression, according to a study published in the May 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Medical Education Participants Recognize Funding Bias

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although most medical professionals believe that commercial funding of continuing medical education (CME) introduces bias, most are not willing to pay higher fees to offset or eliminate such funding sources, according to a study published in the May 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Spontaneous Resolution Affects Cost of Tear Duct Probing

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- The relative cost-effectiveness of immediate office-based probing surgery (IOPS) and deferred facility-based probing surgery (DFBS) for treatment of nasolacrimal duct obstruction in infants depends on the rate of spontaneous resolution, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Peak Intraocular Pressure Tied to Glaucoma Progression

TUESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Visual field (VF) progression in treated glaucoma is affected by intraocular pressure (IOP)-dependent and IOP-independent risk factors, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Tied to Mortality in Diabetes

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Severe vitamin D deficiency may be predictive of increased all-cause mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not associated with microvascular complications in the kidney or eye, according to a study published online April 27 in Diabetes Care.

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Physician's Briefing
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