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November 2006 Briefing - Ophthalmology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for November 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Ocular MRSA Isolates Resistant to Fluoroquinolones

THURSDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ocular surface isolates show high rates of resistance to fluoroquinolones, including fourth-generation fluoroquinolones, but are highly sensitive to vancomycin and gentamicin, researchers report in the November issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

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Atopy a Risk Factor for Ocular Herpes Disease

THURSDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Atopic disease -- and especially severe atopy -- is a risk factor for ocular herpes simplex virus disease, according to a report in the November issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

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Pediatric Ocular Acne Rosacea Cases Described

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Ocular acne rosacea should be considered as a possible diagnosis in children with meibomian gland dysfunction and chronic blepharitis, chalazia, photophobia, ocular irritation, and redness that does not respond to treatment. Systemic antibiotics may be effective for such children, according to a report in the November issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

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Drops for Ocular Hypertension May Boost Cataract Rates

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Use of topical medication to treat ocular hypertension or glaucoma is associated with higher rates of cataract extraction and cataract/filtering surgery, according to the results of a multi-center clinical trial published in the November issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

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Parental Leave Policies Vary Across Specialty Boards

TUESDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Restrictions on how long residents can take parental-leave breaks from training and still qualify for specialty board certification are not uniform, and current policies lack the flexibility working parents need, according to a report in the November issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Eye Tests Predict Preterm Children's Vision Problems

MONDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In preterm children, retinoscopy performed around age 2.5 years may help detect astigmatism and anisometropia that persists through childhood, according to the results of a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Brighter Light Improves Seniors' Reading Vision

MONDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Improved lighting and optimal ophthalmologic care could significantly reduce visual disability in older adults, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Transplanted Rod Precursor Cells Repair Retina in Mice

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Non-dividing rod precursor cells can regenerate new photoreceptor cells when implanted into the adult mouse retina, according to a report in the Nov. 9 issue of Nature. The results suggest a way to regenerate photoreceptors lost from multiple forms of blindness.

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Apolipoprotein E Gene Affects Macular Degeneration

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Certain apolipoprotein E polymorphisms are associated with a greater risk of age-related macular degeneration, while others have protective effects against the disease, researchers report in the Nov. 1 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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Poor Vision Remains Undertreated in Adult Diabetics

FRIDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- More than 10 percent of adult diabetics who are not blind in one or both eyes have some sort of vision impairment, and two-thirds of those could be easily corrected with proper spectacle or contact lens prescription, according to a report in the Nov. 3 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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