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September 2011 Briefing - Ophthalmology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for September 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Doctors, Patients Identify Tacit Clues in Their Interactions

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Both doctors and patients identify tacit clues as well as judgments based on these clues during video elicitation interviews of health maintenance examinations, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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U.S. Docs Feel They Give More Patient Care Than Required

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many primary care physicians in the United States believe that their patients are receiving too much medical care, and that the pressure to do more than is necessary could be reduced by malpractice reform, adjusting financial incentives, and spending more time with patients, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Reasons for Referral to Specific Docs Differ Among Physicians

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians (PCPs) and medical and surgical specialists differ in their reasons for selecting specific colleagues for referrals, with PCPs more concerned about physician communication and medical record sharing than specialists, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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SNP in SUV39H2 Tied to Complications in Diabetes

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The minor T-allele of exonic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs17353856 in SUV39H2 is associated with retinopathy in patients with type 1 diabetes, and shows a trend toward an association with diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Diabetes.

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Mortality Up in Hospitals With More Minority Trauma Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of in-hospital mortality for trauma patients are associated with the proportion of minority patients in the hospital, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Work Intensity Similar Across Physician Specialties

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The level of physician work intensity appears to be similar among specialties, with variations in the specific dimensions of stress, physical demands, performance, and temporal demand, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Medical Care.

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Xanthelasmata Predict Death, Ischemic Vascular Disease

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Xanthelasmata either individually or in combination with arcus corneae, but not arcus corneae alone, predict the risk of ischemic vascular disease and death in the general population, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in BMJ.

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Glare Disability Predicts Post-Cataract Surgery Visual Gains

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Preoperative questionnaire score and preoperative mesopic and photopic glare disability (GD) show significant correlation with improvements in visual functioning after surgery for symptomatic nonadvanced cataract, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Many Mistakenly Believe FDA OKs Only Safe, Effective Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of the U.S. public mistakenly believes that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves only effective and safe drugs, but providing consumer explanations can lead to better drug choices, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Matrix Protein Production in Diabetes Complications Studied

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Glucose-induced extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (FN) upregulation in endothelial cells and in the retina of diabetic rats is mediated through microR-146a (miR-146a), according to an experimental study published online Sept. 1 in Diabetes.

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Comparative Efficacy Proposed for European Drug Approval

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- New drugs should be compared with existing treatments instead of placebo before their approval in Europe, according to a report published online Sept. 6 in the BMJ.

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Odds of Board Certification Vary in New Doctors

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Certification of recent U.S. medical school graduates by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) varies across specialties by educational and demographic factors, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Medical Students Show Racial, Cultural Patient Preference

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students may have a preferential bias toward whites and wealthier patients, but this does not appear to influence their clinical decision making or physician-patient interactions, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Similar Visual Acuity in Uveitis With Steroids, Implants

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with active or recently active noninfectious uveitis, treatment with systemic corticosteroids plus immunosuppression gives similar visual acuity to treatment with fluocinolone acetonide implants, with neither treatment giving a superior result, according to a study published online Aug. 16 in Ophthalmology.

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Video Game Therapy Improves Lazy Eye in Adults

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In adults with amblyopia, or lazy eye, playing video games can substantially improve visual acuity and 3-D depth perception, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in PLoS Biology.

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