August 2006 Briefing - Orthopedics

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Orthopedics for August 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Diabetic Foot Disease Outcome Measures Compared

THURSDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with diabetic foot disease, ulcer-related outcome measures may underestimate true morbidity and mortality. To improve disease management, greater emphasis should be placed on patient-related outcome measures, according to a study published in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

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Antiretroviral Therapy Raises Risk of Osteonecrosis in HIV+

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-positive patients who are treated with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) run an increased risk of developing osteonecrosis, according to a study published in the August issue of AIDS.

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Mortality Linked to BMI in Two National Cohort Studies

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Two trials, one involving more than 500,000 Americans and the other over one million Koreans, suggest that even modest amounts of excess weight in middle age is associated with a higher risk of mortality. Results of both studies are published in the Aug. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Gene Identified for Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in the gene that codes for the Dok-7 protein, which normally helps form neuromuscular synapses, are partly responsible for the development of congenital myasthenic syndromes with proximal muscle weakness, according to a report published online Aug. 17 in Science.

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FDA Closes North Carolina Tissue Recovery Firm

TUESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has ordered human tissue-recovery firm Donor Referral Services (DRS), of Raleigh, N.C., and its owner, Philip Guyett, to cease operations with immediate effect.

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Cognitive Performance Linked to Risk of Falls in Elderly

TUESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Among very elderly patients, there is an association between cognitive performance and risk of falls, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of the American Geriatric Society.

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BMI Does Not Accurately Forecast Heart Disease Death

FRIDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index does not dependably forecast heart disease mortality, most likely because it cannot differentiate between muscle mass and fat, researchers report in the Aug. 19 issue of The Lancet.

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Bupivacaine Blocks Digital Nerve for Nearly 25 Hours

THURSDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Bupivacaine provides digital nerve blockade for approximately 25 hours, significantly longer than lidocaine alone or with epinephrine, according to a report in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Alendronate Effective for Steroid-Induced Osteoporosis

THURSDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Alendronate (Fosamax) may be more effective than alfacalcidol at staving off steroid-induced bone loss among patients with rheumatic diseases, according to the results of a double-blind study published in the Aug. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Socioeconomic Status Linked to Late-Life Disability

THURSDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- While the link between extreme poverty and poor health has long been recognized, a new report in the Aug. 17 New England Journal of Medicine extends the socioeconomic disparity to functional limitation and disability later in life.

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Most ED Patients with S. Aureus Infection Have MRSA

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, is the most common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections in patients presenting to emergency departments in 11 U.S. cities, according to a study conducted in August 2004 and reported in the Aug. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Bisphosphonate Adherence Reduces Fracture Risk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Fracture risk is significantly lower in women who adhere to bisphosphonate therapy for osteoporosis compared to those who do not, according to a study published in the August issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Doctors' Views on Disclosure of Errors Varies Widely

TUESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- There is a wide variation across the medical profession when it comes to disclosing medical errors to patients, with the visibility of the error and medical specialty both playing a role, according to two studies in the August 14/28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Nursing Home Residents at Risk for Surgical Site Infection

FRIDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients who reside in nursing homes are more than four times as likely as those who don't to develop surgical site infections following orthopaedic surgery, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Nerve Root Block Helps Patients Avoid Back Surgery

THURSDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Lumbar nerve root blocks can stave off surgery among patients with lumbar radiculopathy due to a herniated nucleus pulposus or spinal stenosis, according to the results of a five-year follow-up study published in the August issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Lawn Mowers Important Cause of Childhood Injury

THURSDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Lawn mowers are a significant source of childhood injury, which may be avoided by improvements in lawn mower design incorporating passive protection, according to the results of a study published in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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Advancing Age Linked to Rotator Cuff Tears

THURSDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing age is associated with the development of either partial or full-thickness rotator cuff tears, and patients who present with symptomatic unilateral rotator cuff disease often have bilateral disease, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Anakinra Effective for Inflammatory Disease

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The interleukin-1β blocker anakinra is safe and effective for patients with neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease, according to new research published in the Aug. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Stretching is Effective for Plantar Fasciitis

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A tissue-specific plantar fascia-stretching protocol improves pain, function and satisfaction levels among patients with chronic proximal plantar fasciitis, according to the results of a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Exercise Is As Effective As Surgery for Jumper's Knee

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee), open patellar tenotomy is no more effective than eccentric strength training, according to a study published in the August issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The findings suggest that eccentric training should be tried before resorting to surgery.

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Ice-Skaters at High Risk for Concussions, Head Injuries

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Children who engage in ice-skating, roller-skating and in-line skating should wear helmets to reduce the risk of head injury, with ice-skaters particularly vulnerable to concussions and other head injuries, according to a study in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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Children Under 5 Most Likely to Get Hurt on Escalators

TUESDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children younger than 5 years of age are more likely than their older counterparts to sustain escalator-related injuries and more likely to suffer injuries to the hand when entrapped, according to a study in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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Bone Marrow Lesions in the Knee Often Inherited

FRIDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Bone marrow lesions in the knee have a significant genetic component and commonly coexist with chondral defects and radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA), according to a study published online Aug. 3 in Arthritis Research & Therapy.

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Physician's Briefing