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May 2010 Briefing - Orthopedics

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Orthopedics for May 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Most Lumbar Disc Herniation Occurs Spontaneously

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) usually occurs without any inciting event, and when there is an inciting event, it is not associated with a more severe presentation, according to a study in the May issue of The Spine Journal.

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Statins May Reduce Revision Risk After Hip Arthroplasty

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of revision after primary total hip arthroplasty is lower among those using statins than those not on statins, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Spine Fracture Classification Scoring System Found Valid

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- A novel system for the classification of spinal fractures, which produces a numeric score to guide the management approach, appears to consistently suggest treatment in keeping with past treatment recommendations, according to a retrospective study in the May issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

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FDA: Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked to Fracture Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has alerted consumers and health care providers regarding the potential increased risk of hip, wrist and spine fractures associated with high doses or long-term use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs).

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Spondylolisthesis Rate in Older Men Higher Than Thought

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Lumbar spondylolisthesis may be more common in older men than previously thought, and those who are more physically active are more likely to report the condition, according to a study in the May 1 issue of Spine.

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Common School Scoliosis Screening Test Lacks Precision

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- The simple and common forward bending test (FBT) used in school scoliosis screening programs lacks precision for detecting spinal curvature and by itself is insufficient, according to a meta-analysis published in the May 1 issue of Spine.

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Muscle Fatigue Linked to Decreased Postural Stability

THURSDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with no low back pain who have had inspiratory muscles fatigue (IMF) use a postural control strategy similar to that of patients with low back pain, resulting in decreased postural stability and suggesting that IMF might have a role in the high recurrence rate of low back pain (LBP), according to research published in the May 1 issue of Spine.

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Nonorganic Pain Drawings Linked to Inferior Outcomes

THURSDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- A nonorganic pain drawing used during lumbar spinal fusion surgery is a significant risk factor for inferior outcome, according to a study published in the May issue of The Spine Journal.

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In Prostate Cancer, Selective Alendronate Use Cost-Effective

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- A bone mineral density test followed by selective use of alendronate for fracture prevention in men beginning androgen deprivation therapy for localized prostate cancer is cost-effective, according to research published in the May 18 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Vitamin A Analogues Not Linked to Fracture Risk

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- The use of vitamin A analogues such as isotretinoin and acitretin, even at high doses, is not associated with an increased risk of fractures, according to a study published in the May issue of Archives of Dermatology.

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Pernicious Anemia Patients at Higher Risk for Hip Fractures

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Even after years of vitamin B-12 therapy, people with pernicious anemia are still at increased risk for hip fractures, which suggests a mechanism other than B-12 deficiency could be driving their vulnerability, according to research published in the April issue of Gastroenterology.

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New FDA Program Targets Misleading Drug Advertising

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced the launch of a new program to educate health care providers regarding their role in making certain that advertisements and promotions for prescription drugs are truthful and not misleading.

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Community Prevention Program Reduces Falls Over 12 Months

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- A comprehensive community fall prevention program may lower the number of falls and improve clinical outcomes in older individuals at high risk for falls, according to a study published online May 11 in BMJ.

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High-Dose Vitamin D Linked to Falls, Fractures in Women

TUESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Older women receiving an annual large dose of vitamin D may have an increased risk of falls and fractures, according to research published in the May 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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High Body Mass Index Linked to Low Back Pain

THURSDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- A high body mass index is associated with an increased prevalence of low back pain, especially in women, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of Spine.

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Growth Hormone Enhances Body Composition in Athletes

TUESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Giving growth hormone to recreational athletes -- alone in women and alone or with testosterone in men -- results in increased sprint capacity and changes in body composition, according to a study in the May 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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