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April 2008 Briefing - Otolaryngology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Otolaryngology for April 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Physicians Lack Feedback on Accuracy of Diagnoses

TUESDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical diagnosis is a largely open-loop system in which there is no systematic way for clinicians to obtain feedback on the outcome of their diagnoses, according to an article published in a supplement to the May issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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Palliative Care Can Improve Patient Care Most, Poll Finds

MONDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- In an international poll conducted by BMJ to determine which area of health care would enable doctors to make the greatest difference to patients, palliative care for non-malignant disease received the most votes, the BMJ Group announced at the International Forum on Quality and Safety in Health Care in Paris this week.

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Nasal Surgery Can Improve Quality-of-Life Scores

WEDNESDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- Nasal surgery can improve quality of life in adults with obstructive sleep apnea and symptoms of nasal obstruction, according to research published in the April issue of Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

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Aural Symptoms Common in Headache Disorders Subset

WEDNESDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- Symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD), a subset of primary headache disorders, often include ear pain and other aural symptoms, according to a study in the April issue of Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

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Airway Endoscopy Best for Diagnosing Cause of Stridor

WEDNESDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- In diagnosing the cause of stridor, a high-pitched breathing sound, in children, airway fluoroscopy has high specificity but low sensitivity when compared with airway endoscopy, according to a study in the April issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

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Causes and Mechanism of Chronic Cough Explored

MONDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic cough, defined as a cough lasting eight weeks or longer, is common in the community and can be caused by environmental exposures to such things as cigarette smoke and pollution as well as by a number of common and rare diseases, according to an article published April 19 in The Lancet.

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Individualized Health Care Budgets Improve Care

FRIDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- The U.K.'s National Health Service (NHS) should allow patients individual control of their health care budgets, an approach that has been shown in pilot studies to improve outcomes and patient satisfaction in a cost-effective manner, according to an analysis published April 12 in BMJ.

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Consider Health Literacy Level When Writing for Patients

THURSDAY, April 10 (HealthDay News) -- Giving patients clearly written educational materials that convey key messages without resorting to jargon is an important part of engaging patient compliance with treatment and can contribute to health literacy, according to an article published in the April issue of Chest.

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Doctors Vote on the Ways to Make Biggest Difference

WEDNESDAY, April 9 (HealthDay News) -- The BMJ has begun accepting votes on which areas of health care allow doctors to make the biggest difference to patient care, with a shortlist of six areas each being championed by eminent doctors and researchers. The winning topic will gain special coverage in the BMJ and the BMJ Group's 24 other specialist journals and online education products.

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Perceived Singing Handicap Predicts Vocal Disorders

WEDNESDAY, April 2 (HealthDay News) -- Among amateur and professional singers, the perception of a singing handicap as measured by the Singing Voice Handicap Index (SVHI) -- a newly validated singing voice-specific health status instrument -- may predict the presence of vocal disorders, according to a report published in the April issue of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

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