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August 2010 Briefing - Otolaryngology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Otolaryngology for August 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Steroid Doses in Tonsillectomy Compared for Bleeding Risk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Giving the steroid dexamethasone to children undergoing tonsillectomy is not associated with a dose-dependent increased risk of postoperative hemorrhage, according to a review in the August issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Dysphagia Linked to Longer Hospitalization, Poor Prognosis

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Comorbid dysphagia is an indicator of poor prognosis in hospitalized patients, and affects hospital length of stay, according to a study in the August issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Prevalence of Hearing Loss Up in U.S. Adolescents

TUESDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of hearing loss in U.S. adolescents rose significantly between 1988 to 1994 and 2005 to 2006, and adolescents from impoverished households appear to be at higher risk of hearing loss, according to research published in the Aug. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Disparities Exist for Ear Infections Among Children

THURSDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Disparities exist across racial/ethnic and socioeconomic groups in the prevalence of childhood frequent ear infections, with white children and those living below the poverty line more likely to report such infections, according to research published in the August issue of Laryngoscope.

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Strep Accounts for 37 Percent of Pharyngitis in Children

MONDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Group A Streptococcus (GAS) accounts for 37 percent of pediatric pharyngitis cases, though prevalence varies by age, and clinical scoring systems could reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing for non-GAS pharyngitis in low-resource settings, according to research published online Aug. 9 in Pediatrics.

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2008 Polytobacco Use Rate at 2.5 Percent in U.S. Adults

FRIDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In 2008, the rate of polytobacco use (mostly cigarettes in combination with other tobacco products) was 2.5 percent among U.S. adults, with prevalence highest among men, young adults, single adults, low-income households, and those with lower levels of education, according to a report published in the Aug. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Prayer Approach Positively Affects Hearing, Vision Impaired

FRIDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Proximal intercessory prayer (PIP), a complementary and alternative medicine approach, may improve auditory and visual function in patients with impaired hearing and vision, according to a study published online Aug. 3 in the Southern Medical Journal.

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Approach in Different Settings Leads to Similar OSA Outcomes

THURSDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep-laboratory diagnosis and initiation of therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) doesn't lead to better four-week outcomes compared to home-based diagnosis and treatment, according to research published in the August issue of Chest.

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Industry-Funded Clinical Trials Yield More Positive Outcomes

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Drug clinical trials supported by industry are more likely to produce favorable results than trials supported by government or nonprofit/nonfederal organizations, and they are less likely to be published within two years of the study being completed, according to research published in the Aug. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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