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June 2010 Briefing - Otolaryngology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Otolaryngology for June 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Doctors Agree Malpractice Fears Drive Overuse of Tests

MONDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- A large majority of physicians agree that the practice of defensive medicine -- stemming from malpractice concerns -- is responsible for an overuse of medical tests and procedures, according to a research letter in the June 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Moldy Homes Linked to Higher Risk of Severe Asthma Attacks

FRIDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- High mold exposure in the home may lead to an increased risk of severe asthma attacks among children with variants in the chitinase gene CHIT1, according to research published online June 10 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Findings Suggest Harmful Effects From MP3 Players

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Temporary changes in hearing sensitivity associated with MP3 players suggest that the devices could have potentially harmful effects, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Coffee Inversely Linked to Risk of Oral, Pharyngeal Cancer

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking caffeinated coffee appears to be associated with a lower risk of cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx, according to research published online June 22 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Tubes Not Linked to Poor Cochlear Implant Outcomes

TUESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Myringotomy tubes (MT) don't appear to adversely affect final outcomes in children who receive cochlear implants (CI), and they can be managed like tubes in other children who are prone to otitis media, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Interest by Physicians Can Play Role in Medication Adherence

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients whose doctors actively review their medication use and prescribing information are more likely to use inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) for asthma control as prescribed, according to research published online May 31 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Questionnaire Poorly Predicts Sleep Apnea in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- The Berlin questionnaire performs poorly in predicting obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in pregnant women compared to polysomnography, according to research published in the June issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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New Method Gives Better Local Start Date for RSV Prophylaxis

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Using five years of local laboratory surveillance data to predict likely respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) outbreak timing is a viable method for recommending optimal immunoprophylaxis dates, according to research published online June 14 in Pediatrics.

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Fatal Medication Errors Rise in July at Teaching Hospitals

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- In July there is a significant increase in fatal medication errors at medical institutions, and this spike is at least partly due to the arrival of new medical residents, according to a study published online May 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Racial Differences Exist in Asthma Prevalence and Care

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Racial and ethnic differences exist in the prevalence, treatment and outcomes of asthma among children with equal access to medical care, according to a study published online June 7 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Mediterranean Diet May Lower Childhood Asthma Risk

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Diet appears to be associated with asthma and wheeze in children, and eating a "Mediterranean diet" rich in fruit, vegetables and fish seems to reduce a child's risk of developing asthma and wheeze, according to an international study published in the June issue of Thorax.

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Microdebrider May Be Best Tonsillectomy Technique

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Microdebrider intracapsular tonsillectomy appears to have an edge over coblation and electrocautery when it comes to tonsillectomy complication rates, according to research published in the June issue of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

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DPFC Embosurgery Effective, Safe for Recurrent Epistaxis

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- For recurrent or uncontrollable epistaxis, embosurgery of the distal internal maxillary artery (IMax) via detachable platinum fibered coils (DPFCs) is a safe and effective procedure, according to research published in the June issue of the Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery.

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