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May 2009 Briefing - Otolaryngology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Otolaryngology for May 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Computerized Prescription Order Errors a Risk for Patients

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Computerized provider order entry systems are prone to input errors that may put patients at risk, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Focus on Meaningful Work Protects Doctors From Burnout

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Academic faculty physicians who focus on what they find most meaningful are less likely to experience burnout, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Balance Dysfunction Common in American Adults

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Disrupted balance as a result of vestibular dysfunction is common among American adults and is a significant contributor to the incidence of falls, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Democrats Set Ambitious Goal for Health Care Reform

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Congressional Democrats face formidable challenges in their efforts to pass health care reform legislation by July 31, but physicians can take the lead to ensure changes are enacted, according to two perspectives published online May 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Sticking to Work Hours Limits Very Costly

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to the 2003 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) limits on work hours, and other measures aimed at reducing fatigue among residents, would be costly with no proven benefits, according to an article published in the May 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Device, Surgery Both Found Effective in Sleep Apnea

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- The mandibular advancement device (MAD) is effective in the treatment of most obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), while surgery should be reserved for patients in whom conservative treatments have failed, according to studies reported in the May issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery.

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Swine Flu Has Higher Fatality Rate Than Seasonal Flu

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- The fatality rate from H1N1 swine flu is slightly higher than the fatality rate from seasonal flu, according to United States' health officials, but they say most cases of swine flu are no worse than seasonal flu.

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Impaired Sense of Smell More Common With Lupus

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may be more likely to have a decreased sense of smell compared to individuals without the condition, according to research published in the May issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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CDC: Thousands Sickened by Pool Chemical Exposures

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Thousands of people have sought treatment at hospital emergency departments or poison centers in recent years as a result of exposure to swimming pool chemicals, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Speech Therapy Exercises Relieve Sleep Apnea

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- The specialized exercises used in speech therapy can be adapted and used to reduce the symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), according to a study in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Common Viral Infection Increases Blood Pressure

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), found in more than 60 percent of adults, increases blood pressure, possibly through the renin-angiotensin system, according to a study published online May 15 in PLoS Pathogens.

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Maintaining Airway Pressure Benefits Post-Op Patients

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Maintaining positive airway pressure in patients after cardiac surgery can improve arterial oxygenation and reduce pulmonary complications, according to a study published in the May issue of Chest.

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Number of Swine Flu Cases in U.S. Exceeds 2,500

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- The United States has surpassed Mexico to become the nation with the most confirmed cases of H1N1 swine flu, according to figures released May 11 by the World Health Organization (WHO).

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Low Intake of Vitamins A and C May Increase Risk of Asthma

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Low dietary intake of vitamins A and C is associated with higher odds of asthma, according to a study published online on April 30 in Thorax which contradicts the findings of a large study published last year.

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Triple-Reassortant Swine Virus Seen Since 2005 in US

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Eleven cases of infection similar to the swine flu outbreak currently under way -- triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses -- have been documented since 2005 in the United States, according to a study led by researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta and released May 7 by the New England Journal of Medicine. This study was accompanied by another study, two editorials, and three perspectives focused on the swine flu outbreak.

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Little Evidence to Support Some H1N1 Flu Measures

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Some of the interventions that have been introduced in the wake of the outbreak of H1N1 flu have little or no evidence to support them, according to an editorial published online May 5 in The Lancet, while a report in the same journal asks whether or not the international response to the outbreak was fast enough.

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CDC Confirms Over 400 H1N1 Flu Cases

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- As of May 5, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed 403 cases of H1N1 flu nationally in 38 states, with over 700 additional probable cases which, if confirmed, will mean the disease has spread across 44 states. The CDC continues to urge the public to rigorously observe preventive measures.

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Medical Center Press Releases Often Lacking Key Details

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Press releases from academic medical centers may often overstate the importance of research findings while failing to acknowledge relevant limitations of the studies, according to research published in the May 5 Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Number of US Swine Flu Cases Climbs to 286 in 36 states

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- The confirmed number of swine flu cases in the United States swelled to 245 in 35 states by May 3, but federal health officials are expressing cautious optimism that the disease may be leveling off and may not be as dangerous as initially feared. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated the number of confirmed national cases to 286 in 36 states as of late this morning.

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Inhibitor May Have Use Against Head, Neck Cancers

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- The histone deacetylase inhibitor LBH589, which has been shown to be useful against some hematologic cancers, may hold potential for treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), according to research published online ahead of print March 16 in the Journal of Pathology.

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H1N1 Flu Poses Major Surveillance Challenge

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Containment of the influenza A strain H1N1, or swine flu, outbreak is probably impossible because cases are already geographically widespread and countries with fragile health systems lack the ability to properly conduct surveillance and containment activities, according to an editorial published online April 30 in BMJ.

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CDC: More Than 100 H1N1 Flu Infections in US

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- As of Thursday, April 30, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed 109 cases of influenza A strain H1N1, or swine flu, in the United States, with 50 cases in New York, 26 in Texas, 14 in California, 10 in South Carolina, and the rest in seven other states. So far, only one death has been recorded.

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Physician's Briefing