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December 2009 Briefing - Pathology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pathology for December 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

LDL Cholesterol Not the Only Culprit in Heart Disease

THURSDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Though low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is usually the primary target of lipid-lowering therapies, high levels of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides, and a high total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio also carry an elevated risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study in the Dec. 29/Jan. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Study Sheds Light on Factors Involved in Brain Tumors

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The transcription factors C/EBPβ and Stat3 appear to work together to trigger and regulate the mesenchymal transformation seen in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), according to research published online Dec. 23 in Nature.

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Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Usefulness Examined

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate-specific antigen velocity (PSAV) may be useful in identifying men with clinically significant prostate cancer, according to research published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Immunocompromised Patients Need Aggressive Flu Treatment

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with hematologic malignancies who develop seasonal or H1N1 influenza, aggressive treatment may be required, according to a study published online Dec. 15 in Blood.

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Progenitor Cells May Counter Chemotherapy Damage

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- It may be possible to prevent cardiomyopathy caused by chemotherapy by obtaining cardiac progenitor cells before initiating treatment and using them for prevention or management of heart failure, according to the findings of a study in rats published online Dec. 28 in Circulation.

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Method Distinguishes Benign and Malignant Breast Tumors

TUESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A new noninvasive spectroscopic method can accurately distinguish benign from malignant breast tumors based on metabolic differences, according to a study in the January issue of Radiology.

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PPIs Linked to Lower Cancer Risk in Barrett's Esophagus

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Barrett's esophagus who take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have a lower risk of high-grade dysplasia and esophageal cancer, according to research published in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Study Evaluates New Assays for Diagnosing Liver Diseases

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- New assays may aid in the diagnosis of chronic autoimmune liver disorders, according to research published in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Bias in Detecting Bladder Cancer Recurrence Assessed

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with bladder cancer and a positive urine test result are more likely to have a recurrence detected by cystoscopy if the urologist is aware of the positive result, according to a study in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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H1N1-Affected Lungs From Deceased Show Damage

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly all patients who died of H1N1 flu show evidence of lung damage and an aberrant immune response, according to a study in the Jan. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Prothrombin Mutation Studied in Obstetric Complications

MONDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Presence of the prothrombin G20210A mutation does not increase the risk of obstetric complications, calling into question the practice of screening pregnant women for the mutation, according to a study in the January issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Novel Gene Linked to Early-Onset Asthma in Children

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified a novel gene linked to early-onset asthma, with different alleles causing the predisposition in children of European and African descent, according to a study published online Dec. 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Novel Gene Variants Associated With Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have discovered two novel gene variants that are linked to increased lipoprotein(a) levels and increased risk of coronary disease, according to a study in the Dec. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Health Impact of Body Mass Index May Be Misleading

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The adverse impact of low body mass index (BMI) on risk of respiratory disease and lung cancer mortality may be overstated, while the negative impact of high BMI on cardiovascular disease mortality may be underestimated, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in BMJ.

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Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help Brain Cope With Overload

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Low intake of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the brain's ability to handle sensory overload, which could explain some of the symptoms seen in conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and attention-deficit disorder, according to an animal study published in the December issue of Behavioral Neuroscience.

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H1N1 Flu Waning, but Many Vaccine Doses Unused

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Although the number of cases of people infected with H1N1 influenza continues to decline and the vaccine supply is now plentiful, not enough people have been inoculated, a top U.S. health official said during a Dec. 22 press briefing held by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Coxibs May Inhibit Effects of Low-Dose Aspirin

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Celecoxib and other coxibs may interfere with the antiplatelet activity of low-dose aspirin, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Chronic Maxillary Sinus Disease Linked to Allergy

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic disease of the maxillary sinuses (CDMS) is often associated with nasal allergy and may be monitored by radiography and ultrasound, according to a study in the December issue of Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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TAK1 Protein Found Essential for Proper Liver Function

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Deletion of a cellular signaling protein specifically in hepatocytes leads to hepatocyte death and compensatory liver damage and cancer, according to a study published online Dec. 18 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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CRP Levels Linked to Heart Disease, but Causality Unlikely

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- C-reactive protein (CRP) blood concentration is associated with risk of a range of diseases, including heart attack, stroke, cancer death and chronic lung disease, but most of the associations between CRP levels and heart disease are explained by risk factors already known to cause heart disease, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in The Lancet.

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Cocaine Use Likely Cause of Agranulocytosis Clusters

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Four separate clusters of agranulocytosis may potentially be linked to the ingestion of a veterinary drug, levamisole, which is commonly used as an added ingredient during cocaine manufacturing, according to a study published in the Dec. 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Head Count of Epidemiologists Has Dropped Since 2006

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Since 2006 there has been a 10 percent decline in the number of epidemiologists working in state health departments, according to a study published in the Dec. 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Fatty Acid Synthesis Important for Brain Tumor Survival

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Fatty acid synthesis is important for the survival of glioblastomas with a continuously active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and, inhibiting fatty acid synthesis leads to reduced tumor growth and increased tumor death, according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of Science Signaling.

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Many Support Screening Newborns for More Disorders

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Most prospective Dutch parents favor adding childhood-onset disorders to the national newborn screening program even if they're untreatable, according to research published online Dec. 21 in Pediatrics.

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Antidepressants Not Found to Increase Heart Risk

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women taking antidepressants, whether they are tricyclic medications or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are not at increased risk of coronary heart disease compared to their counterparts not taking the drugs, but there is a modestly higher risk of mortality and stroke, according to a study in the Dec. 14/28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Autism Spectrum Disorder Prevalence Increases

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Improved documentation and identification of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) may have contributed to a rise in prevalence from 2002 to 2006, but an increased risk of developing an ASD should not be discounted, according to a surveillance summary published Dec. 18 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Cisplatin Linked to Complete Response in Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who are carriers of mutations in a breast cancer susceptibility gene are more likely to have a complete response after treatment with cisplatin, according to a study published online Dec. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. In a related study published in the same journal at the same time, researchers report that geriatric assessment domains can predict treatment response and mortality in elderly breast cancer survivors.

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Melanoma-Associated Retinopathy Biomarkers Found

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of antibodies to aldolase A and aldolase C proteins may be useful as markers of melanoma-associated retinopathy (MAR), while other antibodies may indicate if the disease has an autoimmune component, according to a study in the December issue of Archives of Ophthalmology.

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SIRT1 Alleles Linked to Reduced Obesity Risk

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A Dutch study has found that two alleles of the SIRT1 gene are linked to less weight gain over time and decreased risk of obesity, according to a study in the December issue of Diabetes.

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Amino Acids Found to Restore Function After Brain Injury

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Feeding amino acids to mice who have had a traumatic injury to a part of the brain important for learning and memory restores neural activity and cognitive function, according to a study published online Dec. 7 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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ACTN2 Implicated in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in the alpha-actinin-2 (ACTN2) gene appear to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), according to research published online Dec. 16 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Animals and Food May Be a Reservoir for E. coli

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Animals and food may be a reservoir for pathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria, according to two studies in the January issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Gene Variants Linked to High Fasting Glucose Levels

THURSDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of certain gene variants controlling fasting levels of glucose can help identify children at risk for hyperglycemia with the risk increasing the more variants they have, according to a study in the December issue of Diabetes.

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Immune System Linked to Leprosy Susceptibility

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Host genetic factors involving the innate immune system are associated with susceptibility to leprosy infection, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Gene Variant Linked to Improved Lung Function

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- A gene variant has been associated with better lung function in children with asthma and adult smokers, as well as with a reduced risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published online Dec. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Smoking Status Predicts Long-Term Survival After First AMI

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who quit smoking before or after a first heart attack significantly improve their odds of long-term survival, and smokers who reduce their consumption after a heart attack also have a modest survival benefit, according to a study in the Dec. 15/22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Non-Safety, Voluntary Recall of H1N1 Flu Vaccine Issued

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately 800,000 pediatric doses of H1N1 influenza vaccine have been recalled by the manufacturer, Sanofi Pasteur, because of reduced potency, according to information provided Dec. 15 by federal officials.

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Cystic Fibrosis Testing in Italy Linked to Lower Incidence

TUESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Widespread availability of carrier testing for cystic fibrosis in an Italian region was associated with a decline in birth rates of infants with the condition, according to research published in the Dec. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Leptin Linked to Lower Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

TUESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with higher leptin levels may have a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia in general, according to research published in the Dec. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Statins May Provide Benefit Despite Low LDL

TUESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Based on data from an earlier trial, individuals with low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) may benefit from statins to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease, according to a study in the Dec. 15/22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Contraindications to Beta Blockers Linked to Deaths

TUESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Contraindications to early beta-blocker use become more common with increasing age and are associated with a higher risk of hospital death in patients with acute coronary syndromes, according to a study in the Nov. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Mutations Less Common in Nonsmokers With Lung Cancer

TUESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer patients who never smoked are less likely to have gene mutations commonly found in smokers, according to a study published online Dec. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. In a related study published at the same time in the same journal, researchers report that childhood cancer survivors who had indicated an intention to smoke were more likely to start smoking within five years.

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Perceived Age Correlates With Survival and Functioning

TUESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A follow-up analysis to the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins suggests that the perceived age of an elderly person correlates with their physical and mental functioning as well as survival, according to a study published online Dec. 13 in BMJ.

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Weight Loss and Exercise Can Improve Cardiac Function

MONDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise and losing weight improves cardiac function at any age, but some of those benefits can be lost when weight is regained, according to a pair of studies in the Dec. 15/22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Heart Disease Risk Factors May Increase With Menopause

MONDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The risk factors for coronary heart disease increase in women in the year before and the year after their final menstrual period (FMP), making that transition a crucial time to monitor lipid profiles and lifestyle risk factors, according to a study in the Dec. 15/22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Lower Speed Limit Reduces Casualties in London

FRIDAY, Dec. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In London, the introduction of 20 mph speed zones has significantly reduced road injuries and deaths, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in BMJ.

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Protocol Leads to Ileitis Diagnosis in Most Likely Cases

FRIDAY, Dec. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A standard protocol for investigating suspected acute ileitis can lead to a definitive diagnosis in the majority of cases, according to research published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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CDC: 15 Percent of Americans Have Had H1N1 Flu

FRIDAY, Dec. 11 (HealthDay News) -- H1N1 has sickened nearly 50 million Americans -- which is one in six people -- and killed almost 10,000, mostly children and young adults, a federal health official said in a Dec. 10 press briefing.

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Prostate Cancer Detection Via Biopsy Varies by Operator

FRIDAY, Dec. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The detection rate for prostate cancer by transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies varies by operator performing the procedure, but it is not clear what factors lead to the difference, according to a study in the December issue of The Journal of Urology.

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New DNA-Based Bacteria Tests Yield Faster Results

THURSDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A new DNA-based microarray platform can detect and identify bacterial species with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity and faster than the current gold-standard culture-based method, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in The Lancet.

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Variable A1C Linked to Renal Disease in Type 1 Diabetes

THURSDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 1 diabetes, greater variability in A1C levels over time is associated with higher risk of microalbuminuria, progression of established renal disease, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, according to research published in the November issue of Diabetes.

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Transplantation Technique Feasible for Spinal Cord Injury

THURSDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In the treatment of spinal cord injury, transplantation of readily available mono-nuclear bone marrow cells may be an alternative to the use of bone marrow stromal cells, according to an animal study published in the Nov. 15 issue of Spine.

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Male Breast Cancers Resemble Advanced Female Cancers

THURSDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Though rare, male breast cancers often resemble late-onset female breast cancers, and breast cancer incidence and death rates have not declined in males as much as females over the last few decades, according to a study published online Dec. 7 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Blood Lead Levels Associated With Risk of Depression

THURSDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults in populations with low levels of environmental exposure to lead are at increased risk of depression and panic disorders if they have higher levels of blood lead, according to a study in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Most Early Cases of H1N1 Across China Were Mild

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Most cases of H1N1 influenza seen in China during the early summer were mild, and initiating oseltamivir within 48 hours of symptom onset could reduce the duration of viral shedding, according to research published online Dec. 9 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Treatment May Reverse Sickle Cell Disease in Adults

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A treatment regimen that includes stem cell transplantation can lead to stable grafts and reversal of disease in adults with sickle cell disease, according to a study in the Dec. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Model Compares Impact of Breast Cancer Mutations

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A computer model can help compare the impact of various treatment strategies on survival in women with mutations in the BRCA genes that increase the risk of breast cancer, according to a study published online Dec. 7 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. In a related study published at the same time in the same journal, researchers report that BRCA mutations are associated with lower responses to fertility treatment.

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Urine Test May Help Detect Sleep Apnea in Children

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Concentrations of certain proteins and protein combinations in the urine of children may be useful in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Soy Foods Linked to Improved Outcomes in Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Among female breast cancer survivors, eating soy foods is associated with a lower risk of death and breast cancer recurrence, according to research published in the Dec. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Study Explores Genetics of Microalbuminuria in Diabetes

TUESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, the Ala12 allele of the Pro12Ala polymorphism of peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor-γ2 (PPAR-γ2) may reduce the risk of persistent microalbuminuria, according to research published in the December issue of Diabetes.

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Prenatal Microbe Exposure Protects Against Asthma

TUESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to environmental microbes protects the offspring from developing asthma, supporting the "hygiene hypothesis," or the idea that the increasing prevalence of allergies and asthma is due to decreasing exposure to environmental microbes, according to a study published online Dec. 7 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

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Smoking, Drinking Linked to Multiple Cancer Effects

MONDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term cigarette smoking is linked to a higher risk of colorectal cancer, and alcohol consumption before or after diagnosis of head or neck cancer reduces the chance of survival, according to two studies in the December Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Lipid Levels Associated With Pregnancy Complications

FRIDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of triglycerides during pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus or preeclampsia, according to a study in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Research Finds Exercise Helps Men With Prostate Cancer

FRIDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- An exercise program improves muscle mass and strength, function, and well-being in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen suppression treatment, according to a study published online Nov. 30 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. In another study published at the same time in the same journal, researchers identify risk factors for impaired fertility in male survivors of childhood cancers.

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Study Compares Cardiac, Death Risks of Diabetes Drugs

FRIDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the sulphonylurea class of drugs for diabetes carries elevated risks of cardiac and all-cause death, while among drugs in the thiazolidinedione class, pioglitazone posed the lowest risk, according to an analysis published online Dec. 3 in BMJ.

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Weight Loss Can Reduce Apnea Disease Severity

FRIDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Obese men with obstructive sleep apnea who lost significant weight on a stringent diet markedly reduced the severity of their disease in comparison with a control group that did not diet, according to a study published online Dec. 3 in BMJ.

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Tool Helps Predict Mortality in Hemodialysis Patients

FRIDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A new prognostic tool may help physicians give hemodialysis patients a six-month prognosis, according to a study published online Dec. 3 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Protein May Be Useful Target for Cancer Therapy

THURSDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In several types of tumors, targeting the cell surface protease known as fibroblast activation protein (FAP) can inhibit tumor growth, according to research published in the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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HPV Vaccine Can Maintain Effectiveness Beyond Six Years

THURSDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine from GlaxoSmithKline (Cervarix) provides protection beyond six years from infection by HPV-16 and HPV-18, the HPV types most commonly associated with cervical cancer, according to a study published online on Dec. 3 in The Lancet.

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Community-Associated Superbug Poses Threat

THURSDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have nearly doubled in the last decade and are adding to the problem of hospital-associated MRSA, according to a study in the December issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Toxic in Mice

THURSDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Titanium dioxide nanoparticles, found in products such as paint and cosmetics, damage DNA and cause inflammation in mice, according to a study in the Nov. 15 issue of Cancer Research.

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Contrast Medium Can Increase DNA Breakage in CT Scan

THURSDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The use of contrast medium (CM) in computed tomography (CT) scanning can significantly increase DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the peripheral blood lymphocytes, according to a study in the December issue of Radiology.

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Mutation Classes Linked to Cystic Fibrosis Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In cystic fibrosis patients, the classification of severity of mutations that is applied to the pancreas may also help predict pulmonary outcomes, according to research published in the December issue of Radiology.

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Lipid Profile of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Determined

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFL) have increased lipid production and changes in enzymes involved in the metabolism of lipids and fatty acids, according to a study in the December issue of Hepatology.

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Stem Cells May Improve Outcomes After Heart Attack

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Perfusing stem cells into the heart to promote repair after a heart attack is safe and improves outcomes such as cardiac arrhythmias, pulmonary function, left ventricular function and overall symptoms, according to a study in the Dec. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Hospital Report Cards Seldom Lead to Improved Cardiac Care

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Issuing public report cards on hospitals did not result in significant improvements in cardiac care, according to a Canadian study in the Dec. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study was released early online to coincide with its presentation at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, held from Nov. 14 to 18 in Orlando, Fla.

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H1N1 Influenza Rates Drop in Many States

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- H1N1 influenza rates are declining across the United States, but many experts say there will probably be another surge this winter, a federal health official announced Dec. 2.

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Enzyme Therapy Brings Relief in Fabry's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Fabry's disease improved their cardiac hypertrophy, reduced their pain, and improved their quality of life after five years of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy, according to a study published online Dec. 2 in The Lancet.

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Tenofovir DF-Emtricitabine Is Effective Initial HIV Therapy

TUESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- As initial therapy in patients with HIV-1, treatment with abacavir-lamivudine may be less successful than treatment with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (DF)-emtricitabine, according to a study published online Dec. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Women Researchers Lag Behind Men in Grant Awards

TUESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Female physicians with a proven interest in research are less likely to receive prestigious research grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) than are male physicians, according to a study in the Dec. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Physician's Briefing
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