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January 2011 Briefing - Pathology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pathology for January 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Improvement of Behavioral Effects of Fragile X Syndrome

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Evaluation of a selective metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) inhibitor in treating fragile X Syndrome (FXS) indicates improvement in patients with a fully methylated fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene, according to a study published in the Jan. 5 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Nocturia Is a Predictive Factor of Mortality

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Nocturia is a strong predictive factor of mortality in men and women younger than 65, with a dose-response pattern of increased mortality risk with increasing number of nightly voiding episodes, according to a study in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging Classifies Liver Cancer

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological biopsy analysis are both efficient methods for subtyping hepatocellular adenomas (HCAs), according to a study published online Jan. 12 in Hepatology.

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Air Filters May Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of high efficiency particle air (HEPA) filters may help to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease associated with air pollution exposure, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Biosensor May ID Antibiotic Susceptibility of Bacteria

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A biosensor-based antimicrobial susceptibility test (b-AST) may enable the rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility of urinary tract pathogens, according to a study published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Adult ADHD Linked to Lewy Body Dementia

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with symptoms of attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at increased risk of developing dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), according to a study published in the January issue of the European Journal of Neurology.

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Diet May Be to Blame for Rise in Asthma Prevalence

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of asthma is increasing rapidly, and diet has emerged in the last 15 years as a possible culprit. Researchers explore the relationship between diet and asthma in two articles published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Immune-Mediated Diseases May Up Thromboembolism Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- People admitted to the hospital with immune-mediated diseases may have a higher risk of getting venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to research published online Jan. 10 in BMC Medicine.

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Parental History Independently Predicts Myocardial Infarction

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Parental history (PH) of myocardial infarction (MI) is an independent predictor of future MI, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Electronic Health Records May Not Improve Care Quality

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) and clinical decision support (CDS) do not appear to improve the quality of clinical care, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Genetics May Contribute to Hypothalamic Amenorrhea

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Rare variants in genes associated with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are found in some women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, according to research published in the Jan. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Western Diet Linked to Aggressive Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A Western diet high in fat and cholesterol may be linked to larger, faster-growing tumors that metastasize more easily in mice predisposed to breast cancer, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Pathology.

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Genetic Predisposition for Coronary Artery Disease ID'd

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Certain genetic profiles appear to increase the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and of myocardial infarction in individuals with CAD, according to an analysis of two genome-wide association studies published online Jan. 15 in The Lancet.

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CDC Report Highlights Important Health Disparities

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Among Americans, disparities in income, race and ethnicity, gender, and other social attributes have an impact on whether an individual is healthy or ill or will die prematurely, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, released as a supplement to the Jan. 14 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Prolonged Sitting Associated With Adverse Health Markers

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged periods of sedentary time without breaks are associated with worse indicators of cardio-metabolic function and inflammation, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the European Heart Journal.

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Health Practices Unaffected by Commercial Genomic Profiling

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Direct-to-consumer genomewide profiling tests, marketed as a means of assessing the risk of various common diseases, have little psychological, behavioral, or clinical impact on subjects, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Mutation Raises HDL, Lowers Efflux From Macrophages

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic mutation can cause increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and reduced cholesterol efflux from macrophages in its carriers, and the capacity for HDL to accept cholesterol from macrophages may be predictive of the risk of coronary artery disease, according to two articles published in the Jan. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Multiplexed Maternal Plasma Sequencing Detects Trisomy 21

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Multiplexed maternal plasma DNA sequencing analysis could be used in high-risk pregnancies to rule out fetal trisomy 21, rendering invasive diagnostic procedures unnecessary if referrals are based on sequencing results, according to a study published Jan. 11 in BMJ.

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Burnout Levels Particularly High in Residents

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of burnout and risk for burnout are high in physicians, particularly residents, and more than a quarter of anesthesiology chairs meet criteria for high burnout, according to two articles published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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Physical Activity Lowers Risk of Colon Cancer Death

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- People who participate in long-term physical activity have a decreased risk of death from colon cancer, according to a study published in the December issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Bone Disease Common in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Osteoporosis appears to be common among patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), with older age, low body mass index (BMI), and long duration of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) potential predictors of bone disease, according to a study published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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KRAS Mutations Predictive of CRC Treatment Failure

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with KRAS mutations treated with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR)-based therapy for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) appear to experience reduced survival and higher treatment failure rates, according to a review published in the Jan. 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Familial Risk for Fatal Cancer As High As for Incident Cancers

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Familial risks for fatal cancers appear to be at least as high as those for incident cancers for several common cancers, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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MS-Related Gene More Common in Women Than Men

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- A gene associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) appears to be more common in women than in men with the illness, according to research published online Jan. 5 in Neurology.

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Vitamin D Helpful in Subset of Tuberculosis Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic subgroup of people with pulmonary tuberculosis may experience an enhanced response to therapy when supplemented by high-dose vitamin D, according to research published online Jan. 6 in The Lancet.

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Genes Linked to Gallstone Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Two major genetic risk factors, ABCG8 and UGT1A1, contribute largely to the risk of gallstone disease, specifically in men, according to a report published in the December issue of Gastroenterology.

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Estrogen May Promote Spread of Head and Neck Cancer

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen appears to induce the expression of genes that ultimately promote the development of head and neck cancers, according to research published in the January issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

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