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January 2015 Briefing - Pathology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pathology for January 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Recurrent Kidney Stones Linked to Arterial Calcium Deposits

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some people who develop recurring kidney stones may also have high levels of calcium deposits in their blood vessels, and that could explain their increased risk for cardiovascular disease, new research suggests. The findings were published online Jan. 29 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Colorectal Cancer Rates on Rise in Young Americans

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although the overall rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) has fallen in recent decades, new research suggests that over the last 20 years the disease has been increasing among young and early middle-aged American adults. Results of the study were published in the December issue of the Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology.

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Obama to Launch Personalized Medicine Research Initiative

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In what could be a significant advance for personalized medicine, President Barack Obama will ask Congress to fund a research program aimed at developing treatments that would be tailored to a patient's individual genes, the White House said Friday.

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CDC: Measles Cases in January Top Typical Load for Entire Year

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The United States has seen more cases of measles in January than it usually does in an entire year, federal health officials said Thursday.

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Topical Acne Gel Linked to Methemoglobinemia

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of topical dapsone may have led to the development of methemoglobinemia, according to a case study published in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Decreasing Serum Sodium Ups Liver Transplant Survival

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For liver transplantation (LT) recipients with model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores above 11, survival benefit increases with decreasing serum sodium values, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in Liver Transplantation.

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Results Appear Promising for Experimental Ebola Vaccine

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Early results suggest an experimental Ebola vaccine triggers an immune response and is safe to use. The findings were published online Jan. 28 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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PCBs, Phthalates Linked to Earlier Menopause

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found that menopause typically begins two to four years earlier in women with high levels of certain chemicals found in household items, personal care products, plastics, and the environment, compared to women with lower levels of the chemicals. The study was published online Jan. 28 in PLOS ONE.

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Hepatitis A Hospitalizations Down From 2002 to 2011

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 2002 to 2011 there was a decrease in the rate of hospitalizations for hepatitis A, according to a study published in the February issue of Hepatology.

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Triglycerides Significantly Elevated in Women With GDM

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), triglycerides are significantly elevated throughout pregnancy, according to a review published online Jan. 22 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Anxiety Moderates Amyloid-β Association With Cognition

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults, elevated amyloid-β (Aβ) levels correlate with cognitive decline, and elevated anxiety moderates these associations, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Teledermoscopy Feasible, Effective for Monitoring Nevi

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Teledermoscopy is feasible and effective for short-term monitoring of clinically atypical nevi, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Benefits Package Important for Attracting, Retaining Staff

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An appropriately-targeted benefits package is crucial for attracting and retaining employees, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Leptin May Mediate Knee-Related Osteoarthritis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The inflammatory adipokine leptin may have a mediating effect on the relationship between body weight and knee osteoarthritis (OA) in older adults, according to research published in the January issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Core Needle Biopsy Helpful With Cervical Lymphadenopathy

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Core needle biopsy (CNB) is a more sensitive tool than fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) for cervical lymphadenopathy evaluation, according to a study published in the February issue of Head & Neck.

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Increase in Biopsies With DCIS, Invasive CA After Mammogram

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women undergoing screening mammography, there has been an increase in the percentage of biopsies with diagnoses of invasive carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according to a study published online Jan. 20 in Cancer.

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Chlorhexidine Bathing Doesn't Cut Health Care-Linked Infections

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For critically ill patients, chlorhexidine bathing does not reduce health-care-associated infections, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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How Does DPP-4 Inhibition Affect Liver Function?

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibition may attenuate hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance induced by the Western diet (WD) through hepatic lipid remodeling and modulation of hepatic mitochondrial function, according to research published online Jan. 20 in Diabetes.

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Glucose Breath Test Positivity Up in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The positive rate of the glucose breath test is higher in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially Crohn's disease, than in healthy controls, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Viruses Implicated in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Viruses may play a role in inflammatory bowel diseases, including the two most common types, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, according to a new study published online Jan. 22 in Cell.

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Moderate Changes in Lipids With Tocilizumab/Tofacitinib in RA

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), moderate changes in lipids are observed after treatment with tocilizumab or tofacitinib, according to a review published in the January issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Higher Cardiovascular Risk Seen With Eczema

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with eczema may also have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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ASCO Reports Biggest Clinical Cancer Advances for 2015

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The biggest clinical cancer advances for 2015 have been identified in an annual report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Overuse of Abx for Travelers' Diarrhea Creating Superbugs

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The overuse of antibiotics to treat travelers' diarrhea may contribute to the spread of drug-resistant superbugs, a new study suggests. The findings were published online Jan. 21 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Hormonal Contraceptives Linked to Higher Risk of Glioma

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk for developing a glioma appears to go up with long-term use of hormonal contraceptives, new research suggests. The findings were published online in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Physicians Rank the Best EHR Systems of 2014

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have ranked electronic health record (EHR) systems based on five key performance areas, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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High Levels of Formaldehyde Seen in E-Cigarette Vapor

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- E-cigarette vapor can contain cancer-causing formaldehyde at levels up to 15 times higher than regular cigarettes, according to a letter published in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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More Diverticulitis in Areas With Low-UV Light Exposure

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lower ultraviolet (UV) light is associated with increased rate of diverticulitis admissions, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in JAMA Surgery.

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Incidence of PE Hospitalizations Rises From 2001 to 2010

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of hospitalizations for pulmonary embolism (PE) increased from 2001 to 2010, and a pattern of seasonal variation can be seen in PE hospitalizations, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Coffee Consumption Linked With Reduced Melanoma Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Coffee drinkers have a lower risk of malignant melanoma, with a trend toward more protection with higher intake, according to findings published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Collaboration Between Med Students Cuts Diagnostic Errors

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For fourth-year medical students, working collaboratively is associated with a reduction in diagnostic errors, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Docs Should Negotiate Health Care Payer Contracts

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The terms in health care payer contracts are not immutable, and contracts should be negotiated, according to an article published Jan. 9 in Medical Economics.

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H. Pylori Tied to Lower Risk of Multiple Sclerosis in Women

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who harbor the bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) may be less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study published online Jan. 19 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Most Docs Work 40 to 60 Hours Per Week

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians work long hours, with most working 40 to 60 hours per week and a considerable proportion working 61 to 80 or more hours per week, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Prostate Cancer Mortality Benefit Seen for Family Hx-Based Screens

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Screening white men with a family history of prostate cancer appears to be associated with a decrease in prostate cancer-specific mortality, according to a study published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Florida Researchers Discover New Virus in Ticks

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Tacaribe virus, an arenavirus, has been found in nearly 10 percent of Lone Star ticks trapped by researchers in north central Florida, according to a new study published online Dec. 23 in PLOS ONE.

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Sputum Biomarkers May Help ID Malignant Lung Nodules

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental test which checks sputum for three microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers of lung cancer was able to distinguish early-stage lung cancer from noncancerous nodules the majority of the time, according to findings published in the Jan. 15 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.

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CRP/ESR Disagreement Common in Infection, Inflammation

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with suspected infection or inflammation, C-reactive protein (CRP)/erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) disagreement is common, according to a study published online Dec. 31 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Teenage Acne Linked to Melanoma in Women

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There appears to be an association between teenage acne and melanoma, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Cancer.

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CDC: This Year's Flu Vaccination Offers 23 Percent Protection

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- This season's influenza vaccine reduces the risk of needing medical care because of the flu by only 23 percent, according to research published in the Jan. 16 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Insulin Resistance Ups Breast Cancer Risk Regardless of BMI

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- After menopause, unhealthy insulin levels may predict breast cancer risk even more than excess weight, new research suggests. The study was published in the Jan. 15 issue of Cancer Research.

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Race, Ethnicity Appear to Affect Lupus Prognosis in U.S.

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, Asian and Hispanic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have lower death rates than whites, blacks, or Native Americans with the disease, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Rates of Hospital-Acquired Infection on the Decline

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of many types of hospital-acquired infections are on the decline, but more work is needed to protect patients, according to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report.

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Working Long Hours? Beware Risky Alcohol Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Working long hours may raise the risk for alcohol abuse, according to a new study of more than 300,000 people from 14 countries. The report was published online Jan. 13 in The BMJ.

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Obesity Up in Past Decade, but Diabetes Incidence Stable

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Trends show that diabetes incidence has stayed higher in recent decades than it was in the 1970s, although in the past decade, diabetes incidence remained steady despite the ongoing trend of rising adiposity, according to research published online Dec. 31 in Diabetes Care.

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Metabolic Sx Tied to Higher Risk of Endometrial Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A diagnosis of metabolic syndrome is associated with higher risk of endometrial cancer, regardless of whether the patient is considered obese, according to new research published in the January issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Race, Ethnicity Impact Breast Cancer Prognosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The chances of being diagnosed with early breast cancer, as well as surviving it, vary greatly depending on race and ethnicity, according to a new study published Jan. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Lung Cancer Incidence Down at Higher Altitudes

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For every 3,300-foot rise in elevation, lung cancer incidence fell by 7.23 cases per 100,000 people, according to research published online Jan. 13 in PeerJ.

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Guidelines Presented for Clinical Documentation in 21st Century

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines have been developed for clinical documentation and interrelated issues. The position paper has been published online Jan. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Oral HPV16 Appears to Persist Longer in Older Men

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) infection seems to last a year or more longer in men over the age of 45 than it does in younger men, according to new research published online Jan. 9 in Cancer Prevention Research.

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CDC Urging Flu Vaccination, Prompt Use of Antivirals

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Thousands of people are being hospitalized and 26 children have died from influenza so far, Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H., director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said during a Friday press briefing.

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Disney-Related Measles Outbreak Now Includes 3 States

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A measles outbreak linked to Disney theme parks in California included 19 people in three states as of Friday, according to health officials.

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AMA Reports on How Docs Use Their Free Time

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association recently surveyed physicians to find what activities they pursue when not in the exam room.

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Possible Link Between E-Cigs, Risk of Infections

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Vapor from electronic cigarettes may increase young people's risk of respiratory infections, regardless of whether or not it contains nicotine, according to a new laboratory study reported in a recent issue of PLOS ONE.

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Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Tied to Higher HIV Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The injectable birth control depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is associated with an increased risk of HIV infection in women, according to a review of research in Africa. Results of the review were published online Jan. 8 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Interim Guidance Issued for HPV Test As Pap Alternative

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The cobas human papillomavirus (HPV) test is an effective, one-test alternative to the current recommendation of screening with either a Pap test alone or a combination of the HPV test and a Pap test, according to an interim guidance report issued by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology and the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology.

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CDC: Occupationally Acquired HIV Now Rare

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Documented occupational acquisition of HIV has now become rare in the United States, according to research published in the Dec. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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USRDS: Kidney Disease on the Rise, but Patients Faring Better

THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Despite a rising incidence of kidney disease, rates of kidney failure and related deaths are declining in the United States, according to a new report.

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California Measles Cases Linked to Disney Park Visits

THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Seven people in California and two in Utah with confirmed cases of measles likely contracted the illness during visits to Disney theme parks in December, according to California health officials.

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Novel Abx Appears Promising in Fight Against Resistance

THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The new antibiotic teixobactin has proven effective against a number of bacterial infections that have developed resistance to existing antibiotic drugs, researchers report online Jan. 7 in Nature.

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Blood Markers May Reveal Active Spinal Degenerative Disease

THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Serum biomarkers may be a measure for assessment of active degenerative spinal disease in older adults, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Stroke Risk Up Post-Cancer Diagnosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer increases the risk of stroke independently of other stroke risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Experts Discuss Pros and Cons of Maintenance of Certification

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The pros and cons of the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) are discussed in two articles published in the Jan. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Compound Inheritance ID'd in Cases of Congenital Scoliosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a case series of Han Chinese persons, compound inheritance of a rare null mutation and a hypomorphic allele accounted for a proportion of congenital scoliosis cases. These findings were published online Jan. 7 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Intensive Management Lengthens Lifespan in T1DM

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus can reduce their overall risk of premature death by conducting multiple blood glucose tests throughout the day and constantly adjusting insulin levels to hit very specific blood glucose targets. These findings are published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Article Highlights Top Technology Challenges for 2015

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) audits, meaningful use 2, and the burdens of technology are the top four technological challenges for physicians in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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HPV Vaccination Not Linked to Higher Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine doesn't increase the risk for multiple sclerosis or other demyelinating diseases, according to a new study. The findings appear in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC: Outpatient Visits for Flu-Like Symptoms Up

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The current flu season, already off to a rough start, continues to get worse, with 43 states now reporting widespread flu activity and 21 child deaths so far, U.S. health officials said Monday.

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ACS Reports 22 Percent Drop in Cancer Mortality Over 20 Years

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Progress in the war against cancer has triggered a 22 percent drop in U.S. deaths over the past two decades, translating to about 1.5 million lives saved, according to a new report from the American Cancer Society.

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Low Prevalence of Chlamydia, Gonorrhea Suggests Overscreening

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For urban women aged 25 years and older, the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) is low, and women may be overscreened, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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