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June 2010 Briefing - Pathology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pathology for June 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Best Predictors of Alzheimer's Disease Identified

WEDNESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- In individuals with mild cognitive impairment, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and episodic memory may be the best predictors of conversion to Alzheimer's disease, while cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins and -- to a lesser extent -- FDG-PET predict longitudinal cognitive decline, according to a study published online June 30 in Neurology.

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Researchers Identify Genes Behind Alopecia Areata

WEDNESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified eight genes that play a role in alopecia areata, an autoimmune disease that affects about 2 percent of the overall population and results in hair loss from the scalp and other areas of the body, and their findings have been published in the July 1 issue of Nature.

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Cyclosporine After Transplant Tied to De Novo Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Immunosuppressive treatment with cyclosporine A (CsA), rather than tacrolimus (TAC), with dose level monitoring two hours post-dosing (C2 monitoring) or in patients age 50 or younger appears to have a significant association with the development of de novo cancer after liver transplantation, according to research published in the July issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Biomarker Aids in Heart Attack Risk Stratification

WEDNESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (sAM) levels can predict mortality or heart failure in non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients, complementing other risk stratification tools, according to a study published in the July 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Mammograms for Poor Insured Rise With Stepwise Reminders

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- A stepwise screening mammogram reminder program significantly increases the likelihood that an insured, very low-income woman will obtain a mammogram, according to research published online June 29 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Lower CYP2C19 Function Plus Clopidogrel May Cause Harm

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Patients treated with clopidogrel who are carriers of the loss-of-function CYP2C19*2 allele may be at increased risk for cardiovascular events and death, according to research published in the July 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Statins May Slow Post-Surgery Cancer Recurrence

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- In men who undergo radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer, those who take statins have a decreased risk of biochemical recurrence, according to research published online June 28 in Cancer.

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LGI1 Appears to Be Autoantigen Linked to Limbic Encephalitis

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- The target of autoantibodies associated with limbic encephalitis previously thought to be voltage-gated potassium channels is actually leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 protein (LGI1), which serves as a ligand for two epilepsy-related proteins, according to a study published online June 28 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Doctors Agree Malpractice Fears Drive Overuse of Tests

MONDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- A large majority of physicians agree that the practice of defensive medicine -- stemming from malpractice concerns -- is responsible for an overuse of medical tests and procedures, according to a research letter in the June 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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AHA Releases Guide for Cardiopulmonary Exercise Tests

MONDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- In response to the increasing clinical value of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX), the American Heart Association has developed the Clinician's Guide to Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Adults to complement existing exercise testing guidelines with details on CPX. The new guide is being released as a scientific statement and published online June 28 in Circulation.

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Venous Thromboembolism Risk Factors Vary by Race

MONDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans with venous thromboembolism (VTE) are less likely to have commonly recognized transient risk factors for the condition, are more likely to have cardiovascular disease risk factors, and are more likely to progress to pulmonary embolism than are white Americans, according to research published in the July issue of the American Journal of Hematology.

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Insecticide Exposure May Increase Prostate Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to the estrogenic insecticide chlordecone is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, according to a study published online June 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Moldy Homes Linked to Higher Risk of Severe Asthma Attacks

FRIDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- High mold exposure in the home may lead to an increased risk of severe asthma attacks among children with variants in the chitinase gene CHIT1, according to research published online June 10 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Papulopustular Rosacea Rate, UV Exposure Not Related

FRIDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of papulopustular rosacea (PPR) in Ireland is nearly 3 percent, though cumulative ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure does not affect the prevalence of the condition among the country's predominantly fair-skinned population, according to research published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Rate of HIV Testing Up, New AIDS Cases Down in D.C.

THURSDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- In Washington, D.C., where the HIV case rate is nearly 10 times the U.S. rate, the proportion of the population tested for HIV has increased and the rate of newly diagnosed AIDS cases has decreased in recent years, according to a report published in the June 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Cytology Limits Seen in Low-Risk Patients With Hematuria

THURSDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- During evaluation of low-risk patients with asymptomatic microscopic hematuria (AMH), voided urine cytology is associated with a substantial cost without providing a diagnostic benefit, according to research published in the June issue of Urology.

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Menstrual Cycle, OCPs Affect High-Risk HPV Detection Rates

THURSDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- The timing of human papillomavirus (HPV) testing within the menstrual cycle affects detection rates in women who are taking non-continuous oral contraceptives, as well as in women who are not on oral contraceptives, according to research published in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Parents Divided Over Genetic Testing of Minors for Cancer

THURSDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic testing of minors for adult hereditary cancer syndromes is not currently recommended, and parents' opinions on testing of minors for BRCA1/2 mutations are divided, according to research published online June 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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In Older Women, HPV Results Useful for Colposcopy Triage

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Pap test results can be used together in some cases to triage patients for further evaluation for cervical cancer with colposcopy, according to research published in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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New 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus Test Authorized by FDA

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has authorized a new test that uses molecular biology techniques to diagnose 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection in humans.

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Coffee Inversely Linked to Risk of Oral, Pharyngeal Cancer

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking caffeinated coffee appears to be associated with a lower risk of cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx, according to research published online June 22 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Gut Bacteria Linked to Autoimmune Arthritis in Mice

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of gut bacteria into mice prone to developing arthritis and previously housed in germ-free conditions leads to rapid onset of the condition, according to research published online June 17 in Immunity.

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Racial Disparities in Sepsis Explained by Two Factors

TUESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Racial differences in sepsis rates are due to higher infection rates as well as a higher risk of organ dysfunction among black patients compared with white patients, according to research published in the June 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Imaging Combo Holds Promise for Breast Cancer Detection

TUESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound-guided optical tomography appears to be an effective means for differentiating early-stage breast cancers from benign lesions, and it has the potential to reduce the number of breast biopsies women undergo for suspicious lesions, according to research published online June 22 in Radiology.

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Surveillance Colonoscopy Can Be Cost-Effective

TUESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Surveillance colonoscopy is cost-effective for patients at high risk of colorectal cancer, but aggressive surveillance may be expensive or harmful, according to research published in the June issue of Gastroenterology.

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Incidence Rate of Rare Skin Carcinoma on the Rise

TUESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence rate (IR) for cutaneous appendageal carcinoma (CAC) in the United States is low and varies by sex/ethnic group, but it has been increasing, possibly partly due to increased ultraviolet exposure and improvements in diagnosis, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Flame Retardant Affects Thyroid Levels in Pregnant Women

TUESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- In pregnant women, blood levels of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) are associated with lower levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone and higher odds of subclinical hyperthyroidism, according to research published online June 21 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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PCBs Linked to Reduced Response to Vaccinations

MONDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) early in life may reduce the effectiveness of childhood vaccinations and impair immune-system responses to infection, according to research published online June 20 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Colon Capsule Endoscopy Detects Polyps Effectively

MONDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) appears to be an effective noninvasive colorectal cancer (CRC) screening technique, as its sensitivity for polyps and significant findings compares favorably with other noninvasive CRC screening approaches, according to research published in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Hepatic Encephalopathy Linked to Chronic Cognitive Effects

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with cirrhosis, episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) may be associated with lingering and cumulative problems with learning, working memory, and response inhibition, according to research published in the June issue of Gastroenterology.

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Gene Mutation Increases Clot Risk in Women on Tamoxifen

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Women taking adjuvant tamoxifen for early-stage breast cancer who develop a thromboembolism (TE) are nearly five times more likely to carry the factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation than women on the medication who don't have a TE, according to a study published online June 16 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Smoking Linked to Higher Risk of Flat Colorectal Adenomas

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking appears to be an important risk factor for flat colorectal adenomas, which may explain the earlier onset and advanced stage at presentation of colorectal cancer in smokers, according to research published in the June issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

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Colonoscopies Every 1-2 Years Urged for Those at Genetic Risk

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Getting surveillance colonoscopies every one to two years instead of every two to three years is associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) for members of families with Lynch syndrome, according to a study in the June issue of Gastroenterology.

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Gene-Pesticide Interaction Supported in Parkinson's

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic polymorphisms associated with a decreased ability of the ABCB1 gene to clear xenobiotics from the brain increase the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in the presence of high cumulative organochlorine insecticide exposure, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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New Method Gives Better Local Start Date for RSV Prophylaxis

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Using five years of local laboratory surveillance data to predict likely respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) outbreak timing is a viable method for recommending optimal immunoprophylaxis dates, according to research published online June 14 in Pediatrics.

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Alzheimer's Risk May Be Decreased by Protective Diet

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- A dietary pattern (DP) with higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, salad dressing, nuts, fish, and poultry, and lower intakes of items including red meat and high-fat dairy products may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease by almost 40 percent, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Strict Diagnostic Criteria Define Late-Onset Hypogonadism

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Using a concise definition of late-onset hypogonadism which includes the presence of specific sexual symptoms as well as a strict laboratory testosterone level cut-point in older men can identify those men who truly need testosterone replacement therapy, according to research published online June 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Early AMD Associated With Several Modifiable Risk Factors

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with modifiable risk factors including smoking and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Consensus Statement Explores Diabetes-Cancer Link

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Having type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of several types of cancer, and the increased risk may be due to shared risk factors, though more research is needed to definitively answer many ongoing questions, according to a consensus report released by the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society and published online June 16 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Mismatched Graft Effective in Adult Leukemia Treatment

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Unrelated donor umbilical cord blood (UCB) appears to result in similar outcomes as allele-matched bone marrow and peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplants for adults with leukemia, and may be a viable alternative when matches for the second two options cannot be found, according to research published online June 16 in The Lancet Oncology.

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GLP-1's Effects Similar in Those With, Without Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes, the effects of enteral stimuli and endogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) on insulin release are similar to those in individuals without diabetes, according to research published in the June issue of Diabetes.

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Novel Approach Shows Promise for Melanoma Treatment

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- A novel approach using targeted therapy against the BRAF/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in combination with immunotherapy holds promise in the treatment of melanoma, according to a preclinical study published online June 15 in Cancer Research.

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MRSA Linked to Higher Mortality in Cystic Fibrosis

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection have worse survival rates than CF patients without the infection, according to a study in the June 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Pyloric Stenosis Has Strong Familial Aggregation

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Pyloric stenosis, which is the most common condition requiring surgery in an infant's first months of life, has strong familial aggregation and high heritability, according to a study in the June 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Vitamin B6, Methionine Linked to Lower Lung Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin B6 and methionine levels are associated with lower risk of lung cancer, and factors associated with the decision to not undergo surgery for newly diagnosed lung cancer include black race and negative perceptions of doctor-patient communication and prognosis, according to two studies published in the June 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Many Doctors May Overscreen With Annual Pap and HPV Tests

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Despite cervical cancer screening recommendations that low-risk women be screened every three years after age 30, most primary care providers report that they would advise more frequent testing, and primary care providers are less likely to recommend extending screening intervals to three years with a human papillomavirus (HPV) test used with a Pap test than with the Pap test alone, according to research published in the June 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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HIV Nucleic Acid Testing With Automated Reporting Beneficial

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Adding nucleic acid testing (NAT) that includes automated result reporting systems to routine HIV testing programs can increase the early detection of infected individuals, particularly in settings that serve men who have sex with men (MSM), according to a study in the June 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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HDL Cholesterol Inversely Associated With Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and incident cancer risk are significantly inversely associated, and this relationship is independent of factors such as low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), age, and smoking, according to research published in the June 22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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HbA1c Levels Found Higher in Blacks Than Whites

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Black individuals have higher hemoglobin A1c levels than whites across the spectrum from normal glucose tolerance to diabetes, and as glucose intolerance worsens, the differences become greater, according to research published in the June 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Adolescent BP Predicts Hypertension in Young Adulthood

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Blood pressure (BP) at age 17 rises over time in a linear fashion, and both male and female adolescents with BPs in the upper range of normal face more than double the risk of hypertension in young adulthood, according to research published online June 14 in Hypertension.

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Presence of Alzheimer's Genes Influences Brain Imaging

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of established Alzheimer's disease (AD) genes, and a pair of promising and novel AD genes, influence the brain characteristics seen in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of patients with the disease, according to a study in the June issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Incidental Findings Frequently Seen in Pediatric Brain Imaging

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 7 percent of children involved in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study had incidental intracranial findings, calling attention to issues related to counseling families when such findings arise in clinical situations, according to research published online June 14 in Pediatrics.

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Vaccination Ends Disparities in Pneumococcal Disease

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The vaccination of young children with seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in recent years has eliminated disparities in risk for vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) associated with race and group child care attendance, according to a case-control study published online June 14 in Pediatrics.

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Node Removal Count Impacts Testicular Cancer Recurrence

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- The number of retroperitoneal lymph nodes removed and analyzed in post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND) appears to be a significant predictor of testicular cancer recurrence, according to research published in the June issue of Urology.

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Increasing BMI Linked to Several Nephrolithiasis Risk Factors

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with the presence of several urinary stone risk factors in the urine chemistry, suggesting that weight loss should be part of a urinary stone prevention regimen, according to a study in the June issue of Urology.

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Young Adults Focus on Health Behaviors Over Genetics

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, young adults tend to favor health behaviors over genetics as the cause of common preventable diseases, but those with more behavioral risk factors were more likely to lean toward genetic explanations, according to research published online June 8 in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

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Stage IV Prostate Cancer Incidence Down, Survival Up

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- In recent decades, stage IV prostate cancer incidence has significantly declined and survival has improved, but younger men represent an increasing proportion of those diagnosed, according to research published in the June issue of Urology.

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Suppressed Anger in CAD Linked to Adverse Cardiac Events

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), suppressing anger is associated with a higher risk of adverse cardiac events, according to research published in the June 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Genetic Variations Identified in Autism Spectrum Disorders

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- An international team of researchers has identified genetic variants, both inherited and unique, in the DNA of people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The findings, published online June 9 in Nature, may be helpful in early diagnosis and treatment of autism, according to the researchers.

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Insulin Resistance With Normal BMI Linked to Mortality Risk

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- In adults of normal weight without diabetes, insulin resistance -- as measured with the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) -- is associated with all-cause mortality, according to research published in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

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Genetic Variants May Affect Vitamin D Concentrations

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D status appears to be affected by variants near genes involved in cholesterol synthesis, hydroxylation and vitamin D transport, with genetic variations at these sites associated with an increased risk of vitamin D insufficiency, according to a study published online June 10 in The Lancet.

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H1N1, Seasonal Flu Have Similar Attack Rates

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- The pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus had transmissibility and clinical features similar to those of seasonal influenza A viruses, and the use of oseltamivir ring chemoprophylaxis -- along with quick identification and isolation of affected individuals -- effectively reduced the impact of 2009 H1N1 outbreaks in semiclosed settings, according to two studies published in the June 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Lifestyle, Behaviors Affect Headache Risk in Adolescents

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- High consumption of alcoholic drinks, coffee drinking, smoking, and lack of physical activity are all associated with headaches in adolescents, according to a study published online June 7 in Headache.

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Short Stature Associated With Higher Heart Disease Risk

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Being short is associated with a higher risk of coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality than being tall, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published online June 8 in the European Heart Journal.

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Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Not Uncommon in CABG Patients

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are particularly common in men with a history of smoking and other vascular problems, including peripheral arterial disease (PAD), according to research published in the June 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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In Utero Exposure to Chemicals May Cause Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals found in the environment can cause overexpression of a protein linked to the development of breast cancer in adulthood, according to a mouse study published online May 15 in Hormones & Cancer.

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B Vitamins Show No Benefit in Slowing CAD Progression

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), subsequent therapy with folic acid/vitamin B12 lowers levels of total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) but does not have a beneficial effect on disease progression, according to a study in the June 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Several Factors Tied to Higher Depression Risk in Internship

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Several individual, internship and genetic factors are associated with the marked increase in depressive symptoms experienced by medical interns, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Risk Factors Up Odds of Plaque Progression Despite Low LDL

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Several independent risk factors, including baseline percent atheroma volume (PAV) and the presence of diabetes, are associated with the likelihood of continued progression of disease in individuals who have achieved very low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), according to research published in the June 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Racial Differences Exist in Asthma Prevalence and Care

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Racial and ethnic differences exist in the prevalence, treatment and outcomes of asthma among children with equal access to medical care, according to a study published online June 7 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Genetics Implicated in Disordered Gambling in Women

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic factors contribute to the etiology of disordered gambling (DG) among women, as they do among men, and susceptibility genes that contribute to variation in liability for DG probably greatly overlap between the two sexes, according to a study in the June issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Mediterranean Diet May Lower Childhood Asthma Risk

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Diet appears to be associated with asthma and wheeze in children, and eating a "Mediterranean diet" rich in fruit, vegetables and fish seems to reduce a child's risk of developing asthma and wheeze, according to an international study published in the June issue of Thorax.

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Novel Breast Cancer Vaccine Successfully Tested in Mice

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Employing an antigen that is present in healthy women only during lactation, but is also found in most breast cancers, researchers have successfully tested a first-of-its-kind breast cancer vaccine in mice, according to a study published online May 30 in Nature Medicine.

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Combination Therapy Cuts Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Onset

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Low doses of rosiglitazone and metformin given in combination can substantially reduce the risk of progression to type 2 diabetes in people with impaired glucose tolerance who are at risk for the disease, according to a study published online June 3 in The Lancet.

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Many Men Disagree With No-PSA-at-75 Recommendation

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation to discontinue prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening at age 75 is not supported by many men, and men ages 75 and older show higher-risk disease and poorer survival, according to research published in the May issue of Urology.

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Cancer Risk Linked to SNPs Not Affected by Lifestyle Factors

WEDNESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of breast cancer associated with a dozen low-penetrance genetic susceptibility polymorphisms isn't affected by a number of established environmental risk factors, according to research published online June 2 in The Lancet.

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Non-Dairy Calcium May Up Risk of Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Calcium intake, even from non-dairy sources and at relatively low levels, may put Chinese men, particularly those with a low body mass index, at increased risk of prostate cancer, according to research published online June 1 in Cancer Research.

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Heart Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Levels May Indicate ACS Risk

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Obtaining the concentration of heart fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may help physicians identify high-risk patients who are troponin-negative, according to research published in the June 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Ambulatory Cardiac Telemetry Detects Serious Arrhythmias

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Ambulatory cardiac telemetry may provide clinical information that could potentially be lifesaving in patients with serious arrhythmic events, according to research published in the May 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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