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October 2009 Briefing - Pathology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pathology for October 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Endorectal Imaging Benefit Seen in Prostate Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Endorectal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may be useful in categorizing men with stage T1c prostate cancer for proper treatment management, according to research published in the November issue of Radiology.

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Working After Retirement Associated With Better Health

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Retirees who engage in bridge employment tend to have better health than those who cease work completely, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology.

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Proteins Expressed in Liver Cancer May Indicate Prognosis

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The expression of certain epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) protein regulators in primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are correlated with disease invasiveness, metastasis and a poor prognosis, according to a study in the November issue of Hepatology.

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Swine Flu Radiographic and CT Imaging Patterns Studied

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in one or both lungs with consolidation are the most common computed radiographic (CR) and computed tomography (CT) images of patients with swine-origin influenza A (S-OIV), according to a study to be published in the December issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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Study Analyzes Role of STAT3 Genetic Variants in Obesity

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Intake of dietary saturated fat may exacerbate the effects of certain gene mutations associated with body weight regulation and glucose homeostasis, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

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Gene Alterations Replicate Neurofibromatosis in Mice

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Mice containing alterations in two genes involved in cellular signaling are a good model for neurofibromatosis (NF) and its transformation into malignant sarcomas, according to a study published online Oct. 21 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Vessel Type Linked to Disease Severity in Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Men with prostate tumors whose vascular supply consists of vessels with primitive morphology are more likely to develop lethal disease, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Linked to Mortality

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Men with unfavorable prostate cancer whose prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels rapidly increase at recurrence have a higher risk of death, but only if they have no or minimal comorbidities, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Sex Hormones Link to Diabetes in Older Women Examined

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Adiposity and insulin resistance to varying degrees may explain the association of endogenous bioavailable testosterone (T) with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in postmenopausal women, but these factors do not completely explain the associations of estradiol (E2) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) with the condition, according to the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis published in the November issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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HIV Stigma May Still Impact Medical Care Negatively

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A stigma felt by HIV/AIDS patients may negatively impact their access to medical care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Vitamin D Deficiency Found Common in American Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Suboptimal levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) are common in American children, especially non-Hispanic blacks and Mexican-Americans, according to a study in the November issue of Pediatrics.

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Genetic Mutation Linked to Severe Candidasis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Impaired dectin-1 signaling may be responsible for severe mucocutaneous fungal infections, according to two reports published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Link Between Nicotinic Acid and Atherosclerosis Examined

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and atherosclerotic disease, daily use of high-dose nicotinic acid may help reduce atherosclerosis, according to research completed in the United Kingdom and published in the Nov. 3 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk High With Gene Mutation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women with cancer in one breast who come from families with a hereditary breast cancer mutation have a nearly 50 percent long-term risk of developing cancer in the opposite breast, particularly if they are younger at first diagnosis, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Hormone Deficiency Shown to Impair Heart Function

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lack of adiponectin, an adipose-derived plasma protein that exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-hypertrophic effects, in aldosterone-induced hypertension worsens left ventricular hypertrophy and heart function in mice, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in Endocrinology.

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Liquid-Based Cytology Found No Better Than Pap Smear

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Liquid-based cytology has no better sensitivity or specificity than conventional cytology for detection of cervical cancer precursors, according to a study in the Oct. 28 issue of Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Medical School Enrollment Continues to Expand

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 18,400 students enrolled in medical school in the United States in 2009, a 2 percent increase over the previous year, but even more expansion is needed to meet future demand, according to an Oct. 20 report from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Two Studies Focus on Factors Related to Colposcopy

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Younger women in an underserved population had a particularly high likelihood of colposcopic biopsy after cervical cancer screening compared to a repeat Pap test, and multiple biopsies during colposcopy were not associated with a higher risk of new human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, according to the results of two studies published in the November Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Protein May Slow Progression of Lou Gehrig's Disease

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Activated protein C slows disease progression and improves survival in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Protein Linked to Development of Some Lung Cancers

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancers with alterations in two genes may be susceptible to inhibitors that target a protein important in cellular processes such as inflammation and fighting infection, according to an animal study published online Oct. 21 in Nature.

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Far Fewer H1N1 Vaccine Doses Than Expected Are Available

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Because of production delays, far fewer than the goal of 40 million doses of H1N1 influenza vaccine will be available in the United States by the end of October, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued an emergency use authorization for the investigational antiviral drug peramivir intravenous in certain patients with suspected or confirmed H1N1 infection.

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South Asians Show Higher Fat Mass Than Other Ethnicities

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- South Asians may have higher fat mass and lower lean mass than some other ethnic groups, which may be associated with increased Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) and insulin levels, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Cocoa Can Reduce Levels of Inflammatory Biomarkers

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, cocoa may significantly decrease levels of some inflammatory biomarkers, suggesting that the flavonoids in cocoa may help protect against atherosclerosis, according to a study in the Nov. 1 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Researchers Evaluate New Prostate Specific Antigen Test

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels is considerably more sensitive than commercial assays and allows better monitoring for recurrence after prostatectomy for early-stage prostate cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Hypertension and Cardiac Link During Pregnancy Analyzed

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a history of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are at higher risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, particularly if the hypertension is recurrent, according to a Norwegian study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Neonatal Outcomes Examined in Cancer Pregnancies

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancies in women with cancer tend to have good outcomes overall, but have been associated with high rates of induced labor and newborn admission to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Rough Microdermabrasion May Be Better for Skin Remodeling

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Using a coarse-grit hand piece to conduct microdermabrasion prompts sun-damaged skin to remodel itself in a process similar to wound healing, and may be more effective in dermal remodeling than medium-grit use, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Radiation for Prostate Linked to Later Pelvic Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Radiation following radical surgery for prostate cancer may increase the risk of late primary pelvic second primary cancer, according to research published in the October issue of Urology.

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Some Hospital Staff Predicted to Be Infection Superspreaders

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital staff such as therapists and radiologists who are in contact with all patients have the potential to be superspreaders of infection if they fail to wash their hands regularly, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Levels of Cardiac Troponin T Linked to Heart Failure Events

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Serum levels of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) are associated with increased risk of events for patients with stable heart failure, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Benefit of BRCA Testing in Ovarian Cancer Examined

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Testing women with ovarian cancer for the BRCA mutation if they have a personal history of breast cancer, a family history of breast or ovarian cancer, or are of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, is a cost-effective strategy that may prevent cancers in first degree relatives (FDR), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Cisplatin Alone Effective in Children With Hepatoblastoma

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Cisplatin alone is just as effective as, but less toxic than, cisplatin plus doxorubicin in children with standard-risk hepatoblastoma, according to a study in the Oct. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Gene Mutations Associated With Parkinson's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene are associated with Parkinson's disease, and mutations are associated with earlier disease onset and atypical clinical symptoms, according to a study in the Oct. 22 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Most H1N1 Hospitalizations Are in Young Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of hospitalizations for H1N1 influenza are occurring in people younger than 25 years of age, and very few are occurring in the elderly, according to information presented at the Oct. 20 press briefing by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Sources Find Different Numbers of Active Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Estimates from U.S. Census Bureau surveys find fewer older physicians remaining active compared with the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile data, according to research published in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cardiovascular Disease Linked to Hip Fracture Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of hip fracture is much higher for people who have a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study among Swedish twins reported in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Role of Antihypertensives in Stable Heart Disease Studied

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with stable ischemic heart disease and preserved ventricular function may benefit from angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, according to a review published online Oct. 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Childhood Hypertension Linked to Early Maturation

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Accelerated bone growth may serve as a predictor of primary hypertension in children and adolescents, according to a Polish study published online Oct. 19 in Hypertension.

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High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein May Predict Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In stroke-free middle-aged and older people, higher levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein are associated with a modestly increased risk of heart attack and death, but are not associated with an increased risk of stroke, according to a study published in the Oct. 20 issue of Neurology.

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Blood Mercury Not Found to Be Elevated in Autism

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Blood mercury levels are similar in children with autism or autism spectrum disorder (AU/ASD), non-autism developmental delays (DD) or typically developing (TD) controls, according to the Childhood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment study published online Oct. 19 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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HIV Vaccine Regimen Shows Modest Benefits

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A vaccine combination may decrease the risk of HIV infection in a community-based population that has a largely heterosexual risk, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the AIDS Vaccine Conference, held from Oct. 19 to 22 in Paris.

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Hormone Deficiency Linked to Impaired Glucose Metabolism

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Mice deficient in a gastrointestinal hormone implicated in glucose metabolism spontaneously develop impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in Endocrinology.

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CDC Says New Child Deaths Raise H1N1 Beyond Epidemic

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- As of Oct.16, 11 more children in the United States had died of H1N1 influenza in the past week, elevating the disease above epidemic proportions, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at an Oct. 16 news conference.

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Paracetamol May Not Be Best for Infant Vaccinations

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Routine use of paracetamol to reduce febrile reactions due to vaccination of infants may not be an optimal approach, as the drug can also reduce the antibody response to several vaccine antigens, according to two consecutive randomized, controlled, open-label studies completed in the Czech Republic and published in the Oct. 17 issue of The Lancet.

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Gene Therapy Found Effective in Monkeys With Parkinson's

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Injecting three genes critical for producing dopamine into the brains of a monkey model of Parkinson's disease corrects the motor problems without inducing the abnormal involuntary movements seen with other treatments, according to a study in the Oct. 14 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Role of Blood Transfusions for Bleed Complications Studied

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Blood transfusions used for the treatment of hematocrit level drops due to bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) do not result in improved mortality or myocardial infarction outcomes, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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FDA Launches Drug Disposal Advice Web Page

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has launched a new Web page for consumers to educate them on the safe disposal of certain medicines that can be dangerous or even fatal if they end up in the wrong hands.

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Histological Response Linked to Fewer Hep B Complications

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic hepatitis B patients who have a biochemical or histological response to treatment are less likely to experience liver-related complications, according to a study in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Cell-Based Therapies May Be Beneficial in Alport Syndrome

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Cell-based therapies may offer hope to patients with Alport syndrome, according to an animal study published online Oct. 15 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Prediction Model Can Benefit Bladder Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In the management of bladder cancer patients who have undergone cystectomy, use of a multivariate prediction model ("bladder nomogram") for referral to adjuvant chemotherapy may lead to better outcomes than the use of pathologic stage, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Cancer.

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Podcasts May Help in Weight Loss Battle

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Using a social cognitive theory-based podcast can help overweight people lose weight, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Interferon Beta Effects Explored in Multiple Sclerosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The effects of interferon beta on chemokine receptor genes and chemokine expression in peripheral immune cells may provide the therapeutic effect seen in multiple sclerosis treatment, according to a German study in the October issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Urate Concentrations Linked to Parkinson's Progression

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- An increased concentration of the antioxidant urate in the serum or cerebral spinal fluid of a person with Parkinson's disease may slow the progression of clinical disability, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Possible Link Found Between Tumors and Mobile Phone Use

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- There is a possible link between mobile phone use and higher risk of tumors, but studies with a higher level of evidence are needed for confirmation, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Study Finds Exercise Reduces Bone Loss During Lactation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Lactating women who participate in a resistance and aerobic exercise program may experience less bone loss, according to a study published in the October issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

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Gene Variant Linked to Statin-Induced Side Effects

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Women and those with a variant of a liver-metabolizing enzyme have a higher risk of mild statin-associated side effects, particularly those associated with simvastatin, according to a study in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Study Evaluates Hospital Quality and Mortality Rates

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital mortality rates in the United States have improved, although major differences in quality still exist between the best and worst hospitals, according to a report published Oct. 13 by HealthGrades.

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Early AMD May Increase Heart Disease Risk in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may be at higher risk of coronary heart disease, according to the Cardiovascular Health Study published in the October issue of Ophthalmology.

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Suppressing Kinase Activity May Slow Cardiac Aging

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Suppression of phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity in genetically-altered mice preserves cardiac function and prevents the appearance of other markers of cardiac aging, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Circulation.

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Preoperative Biomarker Levels May Predict Cardiac Events

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with high preoperative levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) may be at a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes within 30 days of non-cardiac surgery, according to a systematic review published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Brain Seems to Play Role in Resveratrol's Diabetes Effect

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Resveratrol appears to exert an anti-diabetic effect in mice via the brain, with intracerebroventricular treatment improving hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, according to research published online Oct. 9 in Endocrinology.

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Risk of Cancers in HIV-Infected Patients Assessed

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Immunodeficiency greatly increases the risk of seven AIDS-defining and non-AIDS-defining cancers in HIV-infected patients, and combination treatment that increases CD4 counts can reduce this risk, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Atypical β-Blocker May Improve Endothelial Function

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Nebivolol, a third generation β-blocker that has recently become available in the United States, offers a treatment alternative for hypertension, coronary artery disease and heart failure that goes beyond simple adrenergic blocking with direct vasodilation and stimulatory effects to improve arterial endothelial function, according to a paper in the Oct. 13 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Retrovirus Linked to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A virus has been found in about two-thirds of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, according to a study published online Oct. 8 ahead of print in Science.

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Health Care Disparities Among States Found to Be Widening

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing health care costs and growing disparities in coverage among U.S. states point to the urgent need for national health care reform, according to an Oct. 8 state-by-state report card from the Commonwealth Fund Commission, a private foundation supporting research on the health care system.

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Oral Vaccine May Help Prevent Endemic Cholera

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- An inexpensive, locally-produced oral cholera vaccine may benefit populations threatened by endemic cholera, according to a double-blind Indian study published online Oct. 9 in The Lancet.

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Organ Donor Family Consent Request Protocols Compared

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Organ donation using collaborative requesting instead of routine requesting by a patient's clinician may not provide increases in consent rates, according to an unblinded, multi-center, randomized controlled trial performed in the United Kingdom published Oct. 8 in BMJ.

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Herpes Zoster Infection May Increase Risk of Stroke

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of stroke is higher in people who have had a herpes zoster infection than in those with no history of the disease, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in Stroke.

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Chemical in Plastics Linked to Behaviors in Young Girls

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Daughters born to women who were exposed in pregnancy to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical found in polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resin, are more likely to exhibit aggressive and hyperactive behaviors as 2-year-olds, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Study Assesses Survival After Second Primary Neoplasms

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In survivors of childhood cancer, survival following second primary glioma is poor, though the outlook is good for second primary meningioma, according to research published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Study Explores Thrombus Healing by Plaque Type

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Thrombus healing in sudden cardiac death victims may depend on the presence of plaque ruptures or erosions, and, in some patients, call for different treatment approaches, according to research published online Oct. 7 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Effect of H1N1 on Southern Hemisphere ICUs Assessed

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- During the winter of 2009 in Australia and New Zealand, the H1N1 flu virus had a significant effect on hospital intensive care units, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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ACS Education May Not Reduce Prehospital Delay

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In patients at high risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS), educational and counseling intervention may not lead to decreased hospital arrival times or increased emergency medical services (EMS) use after the onset of symptoms, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Glatiramer Acetate May Delay Multiple Sclerosis Onset

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Early treatment with glatiramer acetate may delay the start of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS), according to the PreCISe study published online Oct. 7 in The Lancet.

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Seasonal Flu Vaccine Protects Somewhat Against A/H1N1

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- There are early signs that the 2008/2009 trivalent inactivated seasonal flu vaccination offers some protection against influenza A/H1N1, particularly in its most severe forms, but this should not be taken to mean that vaccination against swine flu is superfluous, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in BMJ.

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Model Can Predict Likelihood of Acute Heart Failure

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A mathematical model that considers clinical variables and levels of a biomarker can predict the likelihood of heart failure, particularly in patients judged as having intermediate probability, according to a study in the Oct. 13 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Autoantibodies Against Osteoprotegerin Examined

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A case of osteoporosis with high bone turnover in a relatively young man with celiac disease suggests a possible role for autoantibodies against osteoprotegerin in osteoporosis in patients with this condition, according to research published in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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MicroRNA Biomarker Linked to Survival in Liver Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A microRNA biomarker has been identified in liver tumors, with differing levels by gender, and associated with survival and response to interferon treatment, according to a study in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Roundtable Discussion Tackles Health Care Reform

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The health care payment system, the role of consumers in responsible health care spending, and the use of comparative-effectiveness research were topics covered in a roundtable discussion with several health economics experts published in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Antibiotic Found Effective Against Lymphatic Filariasis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The antibiotic doxycycline is an effective treatment against the lymphatic filarial parasite Mansonella perstans, according to a study in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Medical Students Want More Practice of Medicine Training

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students in the United States perceive that they are not getting enough training in the practice of medicine, particularly in medical economics, according to a study in the September issue of Academic Medicine.

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Glioma Risk Associated With Youth Obesity and Inactivity

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of glioma is greater among those who are tall and those who were inactive or obese in adolescence, suggesting a link between the cancer and early-life energy balance, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer Research.

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Technique May Aid Detection of Residual Leukemia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A technique that tags leukemia cells using antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles and allows them to be preferentially sampled greatly increases the ability to detect residual disease, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer Research.

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CYP2D6 Variants Linked With Tamoxifen Response

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with early-stage breast cancer undergoing adjuvant tamoxifen treatment, an association may exist between the polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) enzyme and clinical outcomes, according to a retrospective analysis published in the Oct. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Novel Features of Breast Tissue May Predict Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Assessing the features of a woman's normal breast tissue can help to identify those at increased risk of breast cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Novel Risk Factors Not Found Useful for Heart Screening

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- After a systematic review of the research, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) finds there is insufficient evidence to support the use of any of nine novel risk factors in the routine screening of patients for coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study in the Oct. 6 Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Appetite Hormone May Affect Peripheral Fat Metabolism

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- When administered directly into the brain, the appetite hormone ghrelin regulates peripheral fat metabolism largely independently of growth hormone, according to a study in the October issue of Endocrinology.

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HELLP Syndrome Associated With Long-Term Risks

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who develop hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome have an increased long-term risk of subsequent pregnancy complications and other comorbidities, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Combination May Improve Prostate Cancer Prediction

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Combining endorectal MRI, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and a low free-to-total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ratio is highly accurate in predicting prostate cancer in men with high PSA levels, according to a European study in the October issue of Radiology.

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MRI Deemed Accurate for Diagnosing Endometriosis

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Pelvic MRI is a highly accurate and noninvasive way to diagnose and map endometriosis preoperatively in women suspected of having the condition, according to a study in the October issue of Radiology.

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Kidney Disease Risk May Be Higher in Allergic Diabetics

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In male diabetics, there is a correlation between eosinophil counts and microalbuminuria that may point to increased risk of diabetic kidney disease in those with allergic rhinitis or asthma, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Female Diabetics More Likely to Develop Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with diabetes, women -- but not men -- have a significantly increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation, according to a study published in the October issue of Diabetes Care.

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Low Late Toxicity With Radiation Post Prostatectomy

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Men with prostate cancer who receive salvage external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after radical prostatectomy have a low risk of severe late toxicity, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in Radiotherapy & Oncology.

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Surgical Masks Found to Be Non-Inferior to Respirators

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical masks may be no less effective than N95 respirators in preventing influenza in health care workers, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Sleep Deprivation May Be Associated With Alzheimer's

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep deprivation may play a role in the development of Alzheimer's disease, according to research published online Sept. 24 in Science.

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CDC Says States Not Meeting Fruit and Veggie Objectives

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In a Sept. 29 press release, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says no U.S. state is currently meeting the national Healthy People 2010 objectives for fruit and vegetable consumption.

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