See What HealthDay Can Do For You
Contact Us

September 2015 Briefing - Pathology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pathology for September 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Gene Variant May Boost Effect of Higher-Protein Diet in T2DM

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 2 diabetes may benefit from a higher-protein diet, but it may depend on whether or not they have a particular gene related to vitamin D metabolism, new research suggests. The study was published online Sept. 29 in Diabetologia.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Classification Criteria Developed for Gout

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New classification criteria have been developed with high specificity and sensitivity for gout, according to an article published in the October issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nomogram Predicts Death, Recurrence With Thyroid Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new nomogram has excellent discriminatory ability and accuracy in predicting 10-year disease-specific death and recurrence for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Head & Neck.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Biomarkers Help ID Complications in Pregnant Women With Lupus

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Blood tests may help identify women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who are at high risk for complications during pregnancy, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text

ACP Issues Advice for Assessing Patients With Suspected PE

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Best practice advice on diagnosis of suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) is provided for clinicians in clinical guidelines from the American College of Physicians (ACP). The guidelines were published online Sept. 29 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text

Exposure to BPA in Pregnancy Tied to Low Birth Weight in Girls

MONDAY, Sept. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers with high blood levels of bisphenol A (BPA) early in pregnancy tend to have newborn girls who weigh less than girls born of mothers with low BPA levels, according to a new study published online Sept. 25 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text

Low D-Dimer Cut-Off Appears to Help Prevent Recurrent Events

FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Low cut-off levels used in the D-Dimer-Ultrasonography in Combination Italian Study (DULCIS) resulted in half the recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) events that would have occurred using other criteria in young patients at high risk, according to research published online Sept. 12 in the International Journal of Laboratory Hematology.

Abstract
Full Text

Age, Obesity Affect Gene Expression in Symptomatic BPH

FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Age and obesity affect gene regulation in men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, according to a study published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text

Tips Offered for Management of Genetic Conditions in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Management of genetic conditions during pregnancy may require a multidisciplinary approach, according to a Committee Opinion from the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Full Text

Preoperative Breast MRI Use Increased From 2003 to 2012

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 2003 to 2102 there was a significant increase in preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) use in women with breast cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in JAMA Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

No Link for Coffee Consumption and Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that drinking coffee doesn't seem to up the odds of atrial fibrillation. The findings were published online Sept. 23 in BMC Medicine.

Full Text

Orthostatic Hypotension Could Signal Neurological Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Orthostatic hypotension (OH) may be an early warning sign of a serious neurological disease and an increased risk of premature death, according to research published online Sept. 23 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Ebselen Shows Potential for Drug-Resistant Clostridium difficile

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental study suggests that ebselen might be a new weapon in the fight against Clostridium difficile. The research, which was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, was published in the Sept. 23 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rosacea Linked to Various Comorbid Conditions

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Rosacea is associated with various comorbid conditions, including, but not limited to, allergies, respiratory diseases, and gastrointestinal diseases, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Not All Trans Fats Appear to Be Created Equal for Heart Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study suggests that not all trans fats are equal, and some might even be beneficial. The findings were published online Sept. 22 in the European Heart Journal.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Health Insurance Deductibles Rising Faster Than Wages

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health insurance deductibles have risen more than six times faster than American workers' average wages since 2010, a Kaiser Family Foundation report says.

More Information

CPAP in OSA Linked to Beneficial Activity in Brain Stem

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment can lead to brain stem activity changes associated with restored sympathetic drive in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to a small study published in the Aug. 1 issue of the Journal of Neurophysiology.

Full Text

IOM: Most U.S. Patients Will Experience Diagnostic Error

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new report commissioned by the U.S. government contends that most Americans will encounter at least one diagnostic error in their lifetime, sometimes with severe consequences for their physical and mental health.

More Information

Medical Schools Teaching Students About Costs of Care

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many medical schools are integrating discussions of cost, value, and effectiveness into their curricula, according to Kaiser Health News.

More Information

Hematologic Markers Predict Nasopharyngeal Cancer Survival

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pretreatment neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) may be predictors for survival in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in Head & Neck.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Naturally Occurring Antibodies Promising for Neurologic Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Naturally occurring monoclonal antibodies show potential for treatment of neurologic diseases, according to a review published online Sept. 21 in JAMA Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

More Than 30 Percent of Adults Are Obese in the United States

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In 2014, obesity rates increased in Kansas, Minnesota, New Mexico, Ohio, and Utah, according to a report released Monday from the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

More Information

Docs in Productivity Models Likely to Encounter Compensation Caps

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians, especially those working in a productivity model, need to understand compensation caps, which are set at a specific percentile of national pay based on surveys, according to a report in Medical Economics.

More Information

Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Almost Absent in FUT2 Nonsecretors

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. children with a genetic polymorphism affecting FUT2 secretor status appear to be protected from severe rotavirus gastroenteritis, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio Prognostic in Melanoma

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with metastatic melanoma, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) before initiating ipilimumab treatment is an independent prognostic indicator of poor survival, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Two Novel Cockroach Allergen Proteins Identified

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two novel allergen proteins from cockroaches have been identified, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Volunteer Doctors Need to Check Liability Coverage

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who volunteer their medical expertise should consider their legal risks, according to an article published online Sept. 3 in Medical Economics.

More Information

Mid-Morning May Be Best Time for Workday Break

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Choosing preferred activities for a work break and taking a break earlier in the shift are linked to more resource recovery after a break, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in the Journal of Applied Psychology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Type 1 Diabetes in Childhood May Up Atopic Dermatitis Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in childhood is associated with increased risk of atopic dermatitis (AD), according to a study published online Sept. 15 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Novel Prediagnostic Biomarker ID'd for Non-Small-Cell Lung CA

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Diacetylspermine is a novel prediagnostic serum biomarker for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to a study published online Aug. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Millions of Premature Deaths Tied to Air Pollution

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Outdoor air pollution leads to more than 3 million premature deaths per year, primarily in Asia, according to a letter published online Sept. 16 in Nature.

Abstract-Lelieveld
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required )
Abstract-Reddington
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Meta-Analysis Links Adiposity to Increased Risk of Meningioma

THURSDAY, Sept. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adiposity is associated with an increased risk of meningioma but not glioma, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 16 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cancer Incidence, Mortality Lower Among Hispanics

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanics have lower cancer incidence and death rates than non-Hispanic whites, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

Abstract
Full Text

Women Less Likely to Be Full Professors Than Men

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In academic medicine, women are less likely to be full professors than men and have less startup funding than men, according to two studies published in the Sept. 15 issue of JAMA.

Abstract -- Jena
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract -- Sege
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

H. pylori Linked to Increased Odds of Laryngeal Carcinoma

TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is associated with significantly increased odds of laryngeal carcinoma but not pharyngeal cancer, according to a review published online Aug. 28 in Head & Neck.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

miRNA-506 Affects Metastasis, Angiogenesis in Gastric Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- MiRNA-506 (miR-506) is involved in gastric cancer, inhibiting the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and suppressing angiogenesis, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in The American Journal of Pathology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mediterranean Diet With Olive Oil Cuts Breast Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil may reduce the risk of breast cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Residential Pesticide Exposure May Raise Childhood Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For children, exposure to indoor insecticides is associated with an increased risk of childhood leukemia and lymphomas, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Announces New Steps to Improve Food Safety in U.S.

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced new steps Thursday to improve the cleanliness of food manufacturing plants in the wake of a string of foodborne illness outbreaks.

More Information

Gut Microbiome May Play Role in BMI, HDL Cholesterol Levels

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Intestinal microbiomes might help determine not only body fat levels, but also blood concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Circulation Research.

Abstract
Full Text

Melatonin May Play a Role in Seasonal MS Relapses

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of melatonin are linked to a lower incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses during the darker months of fall and winter, new research suggests. The study is published in the Sept. 10 issue of Cell.

Abstract
Full Text

CDC: Second Death Reported in Salmonella Outbreak

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A second death has been reported in a Salmonella outbreak that has been linked to contaminated cucumbers and caused 341 illnesses in 30 states, U.S. health officials said Wednesday.

More Information

Physician Re-Entry Program Set to Redress Physician Shortage

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An online educational program aims to help physicians get back to work and reduce the nation's physician shortage, according to an article published by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

More Information

4% Increase in Population of Actively Licensed Physicians

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The total population of actively licensed physicians in the United States and the District of Columbia has increased by 4 percent since 2012, according to a report published in the Journal of Medical Regulation.

Full Text

Modest Predictive Power for HbA1c in Atherosclerotic CVD Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the context of conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has a modest effect on predicted atherosclerotic CVD risk, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial
Editor's Perspective

Unlicensed Stem Cell Clinics Operating in the United States

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hundreds of clinics across the United States are offering unapproved stem cell treatments for conditions from hair loss to heart failure and Alzheimer's disease, researchers report in the Sept. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

Sphingolipid Levels ID Women at Risk for Episodic Migraine

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers report that measuring serum levels of sphingolipids might one day help identify women at high risk for migraines. The findings were published online Sept. 9 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Genetics, Environment Equally Contribute to Rosacea

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Risk of rosacea appears to be half environmental and half genetic, with sun exposure, body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, and cardiovascular comorbidity key contributors, according to study findings published online Aug. 26 JAMA Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text

Accelerated MD Program Doesn't Mar Academic Performance

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An accelerated baccalaureate (BA)/doctor of medicine (MD) program does not impair the academic performance of medical students, according to a study published online July 3 in Academic Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

EHR Vendors Not Adhering to Usability Certification Standards

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among electronic health record (EHR) products, there is a lack of adherence to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) standards, according to a research letter published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Non-O Blood Group Tied to Higher CAD, MI Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Having non-O blood group may be an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction, according to a meta-analysis published in the Sept. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Source of Infant Pertussis Infection Most Often a Sibling

TUESDAY, Sept. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Siblings are the most likely source of pertussis infection in infants, according to new research published online Sept. 7 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Chronic Rhinosinusitis Linked to Increased Risk of Other Diseases

TUESDAY, Sept. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is associated with increased risk of other diseases, with different patterns based on CRS phenotype, according to research published online Aug. 31 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

TXNIP May Mediate Insulin Sensitivity in Caloric Restriction

TUESDAY, Sept. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Caloric restriction (CR) improves peripheral insulin sensitivity, possibly by lowering insulin-stimulated thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) levels and enhancing non-oxidative glucose disposal, according to a study published online Aug. 31 in Diabetes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Dual-Modality DRS-FS Discerns Tumor From Surrounding Tissue

TUESDAY, Sept. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Dual-modality diffuse reflectance spectroscopy-fluorescence spectroscopy (DRS-FS) can differentiate tumor tissue from surrounding tissue in patients undergoing colorectal cancer resection, according to a study published in the September issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Life Expectancy Increases Seen Worldwide

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Average life expectancy among people worldwide has risen by more than six years since 1990, and healthy life expectancy has climbed by more than five years, according to a new report published online Aug. 27 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Suggested Response Provided for In-Flight Medical Emergencies

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a review article published online Sept. 3 in the New England Journal of Medicine, guidance is offered for physicians providing emergency in-flight medical care.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

D.C. Needle-Exchange Program Curbed HIV Spread

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A needle-exchange program in Washington, D.C., has successfully prevented new HIV infections, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in AIDS and Behavior.

Abstract
Full Text

Birth Asphyxia Tied to Fewer Than 10% of Cerebral Palsy Cases

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cerebral palsy is likely due to multiple prenatal factors, with the contribution of birth defects exceeding that of other major factors, according to a review published in the Sept. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Histologic Regression Tied to Lower Odds of SLN Positivity

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with primary melanoma, the risk of sentinel lymph node (SLN) positivity is significantly lower for those with histologic regression, according to a review published online Sept. 2 in JAMA Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Agent Orange Tied to MGUS in Vietnam Vets

THURSDAY, Sept. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange have a more than doubled risk of developing monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), a new study suggests. The findings were published online Sept. 3 in JAMA Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Type 2 Diabetes Linked to More Alzheimer's Neuropathology

THURSDAY, Sept. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may be more prone to developing the neuropathology associated with Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Asthma Linked to Increased Risk of Parkinson's Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with asthma may have an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Long-Term Remissions of CLL in First Personalized Cell Tx Trial

THURSDAY, Sept. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia that uses a patient's own T cells (an approach known as CTL019) may cure some patients and prolong survival in others, researchers report. The study was published in the Sept. 2 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Genetic Tests Could Improve Management of Autism

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A pair of genetic tests, chromosomal microarray analysis and whole-exome sequencing, could help parents and doctors better understand the numerous challenges that a child newly diagnosed with autism might face throughout life. The findings were published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Genomic Sequencing Benefits Some Childhood Cancer Patients

TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For some pediatric cancer patients with relapsed or refractory cancer, extensive genetic analysis can open up new options, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Immunological Cross-Reactions May Increase Food Allergies

TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Food allergy can be caused by immunological cross-reactions to common inhalant allergens, with diverse patterns of allergic reactions to foods observed, according to a position paper published in the September issue of Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text

Physician's Briefing

HealthDay

HealthDay is the world’s largest syndicator of health news and content, and providers of custom health/medical content.

Consumer Health News

A health news feed, reviewing the latest and most topical health stories.

Professional News

A news feed for Health Care Professionals (HCPs), reviewing latest medical research and approvals.