See What HealthDay Can Do For You
Contact Us

Eating Frequency, Body Weight Are Inversely Linked for Youths

When stratified by sex, a significant beneficial effect persists for boys, but not girls

MONDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- For children and adolescents, there is an inverse association between eating frequency and body weight status, which is evident only in boys when stratified by sex, according to a meta-analysis published online April 8 in Pediatrics.

Panagiota Kaisari, and colleagues from Harokopio University in Athens, Greece, conducted a meta-analysis of 10 cross-sectional studies and one case-control study to examine the effect of eating frequency on body weight status in 18,849 children and adolescents (aged 2 to 19 years).

The researchers found that there was a beneficial effect regarding body weight status observed in the highest category of eating frequency, compared with the lowest frequency (odds ratio [OR], 0.78). When stratified by sex, the significant beneficial effect persisted in boys (OR, 0.76), but not in girls (OR, 0.96).

"The results of the present meta-analysis suggest an inverse association between eating frequency and overweight/obesity status in children and adolescents," the authors write. "Clinical trials are warranted to confirm this inverse association, evaluate the clinical practice applicability, and support a public health recommendation."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician's Briefing

HealthDay

HealthDay is the world’s largest syndicator of health news and content, and providers of custom health/medical content.

Consumer Health News

A health news feed, reviewing the latest and most topical health stories.

Professional News

A news feed for Health Care Professionals (HCPs), reviewing latest medical research and approvals.