American Academy of Pediatrics, Oct. 11-14

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference & Exhibition

The annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics was held from Oct. 11 to 14 in San Diego and attracted approximately 12,000 participants from around the world, including primary care pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists, pediatric surgical specialists, and other health care professionals. The conference featured scientific sessions that focused on the latest advances in the care of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults, as well as scientific papers, posters, and educational exhibits.

During one presentation, Sara M. Fraley, a fourth-year medical student at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, found that youth baseball coaches were familiar with pitch counting and the risks associated with pitching with a fatigued arm but were unlikely to be using pitch counts all the time.

"The key results presented were that coaches report inconsistently using pitch counts (only 67 percent of survey respondents report using them all the time). This places children at risk for overuse throwing injuries to their growth plates," said Fraley. "The key conclusion is that more awareness needs to be spread to coaches, players, and parents about the importance of avoiding over pitching and overuse injuries."

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In another study, Joshua M. Abzug, M.D., of the University of Maryland Medical Center in Timonium, and colleagues found that the vast majority of splints applied for children in emergency departments and urgent care centers are inadequate and suboptimal.

"Often, the limb is positioned in a way that is not optimal (i.e., not in a position of function) or the elastic bandage is directly applied to the skin, with subsequent areas of edema. Complications can occur, most commonly leading to skin issues, including wounds and swelling," said Abzug. "Health care providers who apply splints in the emergency department or urgent care center may need formal education in the optimal placement of these splints."

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Julia L. Belkowitz, M.D., of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and colleagues collaborated with the American Association of Caregiving Youth (AACY) to better understand the experiences of young caregivers, including youth who spend their free time caring for a family member who suffers from a physical or mental illness or substance misuse. The investigators conducted their study in Florida's Palm Beach County and found that youth caregivers reported spending a median of 2.5 hours each school day and four hours each weekend day performing caregiving tasks at home. These tasks included, but were not limited to, assisting family members with getting around, eating, dressing, toileting, bathing, and continence care.

"This study is an important step toward raising awareness about the issue of caregiving youth," Belkowitz said in a statement. "The AACY is developing partnerships throughout the nation to further understand this special population and expand programming to provide the resources and support these young people need and deserve."

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AAP: Today's Teens Can Be Adept Multitaskers

MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New research conducted by high school students indicates that some youth do equally well on tasks when moving between their laptops, smartphones, and other devices, compared to less media-focused teens. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), held from Oct. 11 to 14 in San Diego.

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AAP: Many Newborns Have Risky First Ride Home From Hospital

MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many newborns are at risk on their first trip home from the hospital because their parents install or use car safety seats incorrectly, according to research findings presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), held from Oct. 11 to 14 in San Diego.

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AAP: Many Parents Need More Education on Concussions

MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Parents' lack of knowledge about concussion may hinder their child's treatment and recovery, two new studies suggest. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), held from Oct. 11 to 14 in San Diego.

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