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Childhood BMI, Waist Size Predict Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic values may also be predictors

MONDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Two recent studies show body mass index (BMI), waist size and multiple metabolic variables in childhood may predict development of metabolic syndrome in adults. Both were published online in October in The Journal of Pediatrics.

Terry Huang, Ph.D., of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and colleagues looked at data on waist circumference, fasting glucose, triglycerides, HDL and blood pressure taken in childhood and adulthood from 611 participants in the Princeton Prevalence Study and Princeton Follow-up Study on BMI. Although childhood values led to many false positive predictions, positive predictive value increased when at least four of these parameters were abnormal.

In another study, Shumei Sun, Ph.D., and colleagues from the Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine in Dayton, Ohio, looked at long-term serial data on BMI and waist circumference obtained in the Fels Longitudinal Study. The study looked retrospectively at data from 151 men and women who met ATP III criteria for metabolic syndrome and were matched by age and sex to 154 controls. Boys and girls who went on to develop metabolic syndrome as adults showed significant differences in BMI at ages 8 and 13, respectively. The study also compared 282 men and women who met ATP III criteria with 461 who did not and found that increased BMI and waist circumference in childhood may predict metabolic syndrome development.

Sun and colleagues note their study "directly links childhood BMI and waist circumference and the metabolic syndrome ascertained in the same subjects decades later."

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Abstract - Huang

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Abstract - Sun

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