Dec. 2005 Briefing - Pediatrics

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for December 2005. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Bipolar Disorder Common in Hospitalized Adolescents

FRIDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Bipolar disorder may be more common in adolescents than previously thought, with nearly one in five teenagers admitted to an inpatient psychiatric hospital affected, researchers report in the December issue of the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

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Pertussis Incidence Increasing Among U.S. Adolescents

THURSDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The pertussis incidence doubled among U.S. children ages 10 to 19 between 2001 and 2003, highlighting the need for adolescents to receive booster vaccines combining pertussis antigens with tetanus and diphtheria toxoids (Tdap) as recommended in mid-2005 by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), according to a report in the Dec. 23 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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TB Transmission Reported at N.Y. Hospital Maternity Ward

THURSDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A foreign-born maternity nurse working in the newborn nursery of a New York City hospital has been identified as the source of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission to four newborns on the ward, according to a report in the Dec. 23 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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FDA Approves Tamiflu for Flu Prevention in Kids Under 12

THURSDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate) for the prevention of influenza A and B in children between the ages of 1 and 12 years, who have been exposed to the flu. Tamiflu is already approved for the prevention and treatment of influenza in adolescents aged 13 and older and in adults, and for treatment in pediatric patients older than age 1.

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E. Coli Outbreaks Traced To Petting Zoos

THURSDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Three outbreaks of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection occurred in the United States in 2004 and 2005 that were linked to petting zoos, according to a report in the Dec. 23 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Parental Concern May Indicate Child's Mental Illness

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Parental concern about a child's mental health may be a sign that the child does indeed have a psychiatric disorder, according to a study in the Dec. 17 issue of the British Medical Journal.

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Particle Size Alters Impact Of Inhaled Asthma Medication

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- While smaller inhaled albuterol particles penetrate deeper into the lungs of asthma patients, larger particles are better at targeting the proximal airway and are more effective bronchodilators, according to a study in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Web Site Boosts Parental Acceptance of MMR Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- An online, evidence-based guide addressing concerns about the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine may encourage more parents to vaccinate their children, according to a study published Dec. 13 in the British Medical Journal.

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Coma Outcomes on Soap Operas Too Good to Be True

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Coma patients in soap operas experience significantly rosier outcomes than their real-life counterparts, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

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Respiratory Illness Deaths Drop Sharply in U.K. Kids

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Since the late 1960s, deaths from respiratory illnesses in children aged 1 to 6 years have fallen from 8.6 per 100,000 to 1.3 per 100,000 in England and Wales, according to a report in the December issue of Thorax.

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Childhood Diarrhea Prevalent in Industrialized Nations

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood diarrhea is still an important cause of morbidity in developed, industrialized countries where the risk factors include child-to-child transmission in daycare centers, foreign travel and lower socioeconomic status, according to a study in the January issue of Epidemiology.

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Sorry, Celebrants: Hangover Cures Don't Work

MONDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that there is no conventional or complementary intervention that will prevent or treat a hangover, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

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Short Drinks May Have More Kick Than Tall Ones

MONDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Because of human perceptual bias, alcoholic beverages mixed in short, wide tumblers may be more potent than those mixed in taller and more slender highball glasses, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

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Cytokine May Play Key Role in Triggering Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Type 1 diabetes may be kick-started by cytokine-induced necrosis of beta-cells in the pancreas, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the open access journal Public Library of Science Medicine.

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Secondhand Smoke Has Lasting Effect on Children

FRIDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Children who grow up with smokers are more likely to develop respiratory symptoms as adults even if they never become smokers themselves, according to a study published in the December issue of Thorax.

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Harry Potter's Talents Include Protecting Kids from Injury

FRIDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Simply by materializing in bookstores, Harry Potter appears to have a magical ability to protect accident-prone muggle children from traumatic injury, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

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FDA Proposes Lower Lead Levels in Candy

FRIDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials proposed new guidelines this week to further reduce trace levels of lead found in certain candies. The proposed new guidance level is 0.1 part per million (ppm) of lead, as opposed to the previous level of 0.5 ppm for candy products likely to be consumed frequently by children.

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Variant Gene Increases Effect of Secondhand Smoke in Kids

THURSDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Children with a genetic variant of the tumor necrosis factor gene TNF-308 are especially susceptible to secondhand smoke and have an increased risk of developing respiratory illnesses that keep them home from school, according to a study in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Genetic Variants Boost Risk of Severe Malaria in Children

THURSDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Children with severe malaria are more likely to have certain genetic variants in an immune system-signaling molecule, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition. The polymorphisms in the toll-like receptor (TLR) genes seem to increase the risk of developing severe disease.

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Cleft Lip Syndrome Linked To Two Novel Genetic Mutations

THURSDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Two novel TP63 mutations have been identified that result in the rare ankyloblepharon, ectodermal defects, and cleft lip and palate (AEC) syndrome, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Behavior Problems in Medical School Forecast Trouble

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Disciplinary action against practicing physicians is strongly linked to problem behavior in medical school, according to a study published in the Dec. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Food Labeling Law Requires Listing of Allergens

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced this week that food products must contain a list on their label of all ingredients derived from eight major allergenic foods to comply with a new law that takes effect Jan. 1, 2006.

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Oseltamivir Resistance Seen in Two Avian Flu Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Two of eight Vietnamese patients treated with oseltamivir (Tamiflu) died of avian flu earlier this year after the influenza A (H5N1) virus developed high-level resistance to the drug, according to a report published in the Dec. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Oxygen Deprivation Produces Autism-Like Changes in Rats

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Rats briefly deprived of oxygen shortly after birth develop auditory system deficits similar to those seen in autism and other developmental disorders, according to a study published online Dec. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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Primary Anastomosis Valid for Infants with Enterocolitis

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Infants who weigh less than 1,000 grams and have necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) have similar outcomes whether they are treated with resection and primary anastomosis or with stoma formation, according to a study in the December issue of the Archives of Surgery. However, mortality in these patients is high, regardless of treatment, the authors say.

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Pyloromyotomy Success Linked to Hospital, Surgeon Volume

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Surgeons and hospitals with higher volumes generate better results when treating infants with pyloric stenosis, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Hospital 'Handoffs' Common Source of Medical Errors

TUESDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Poor communication during hospital "handoffs," when patient care transitions from one physician or team of physicians to the next, may be responsible for many of the estimated 44,000 to 98,000 deaths that occur each year in U.S. hospitals due to medical errors, according to a study published in the December issue of Academic Medicine.

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Genetic Test for Long QT Syndrome Developed

TUESDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed a novel and efficient genetic testing method for long QT syndrome (LQTS) that may improve treatment for patients, as well as reduce cost and make genetic testing more widely available, according to a study in the Dec. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Low Fitness of U.S. Teens and Adults Linked to CVD Risk

TUESDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- About one-third of teens and 14% of adults in the United States have poor cardiorespiratory fitness, and those less-fit individuals tend to have other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, such as a higher body mass index and elevated cholesterol, according to a study published in the Dec. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Respiratory Syncytial Virus Gets Early Start in 2005

TUESDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The peak season for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) began mid-October in the southern United States this year, and health-care providers should consider RSV as a possible diagnosis and provide prophylaxis for high-risk populations, according to a report in the Dec. 16 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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CDC Finds Impaired Fecundity Increased in U.S. Women

MONDAY, Dec. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing numbers of U.S. women are having difficulty getting pregnant, according to a 244-page report released Monday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report also finds that women's reproductive experiences, marital status and history of sexually transmitted infections vary significantly by socioeconomic status, ethnicity, race and age at first intercourse.

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Boys More Likely When Conception Takes Longer

MONDAY, Dec. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The longer it takes a woman to conceive, the more likely it is she will have a boy, according to a study in the Dec. 17 issue of the British Medical Journal.

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Study Sheds Light on Rare Respiratory Syndrome

MONDAY, Dec. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Mice with a mutation in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene have less norepinephrine and serotonin as well as drastically fewer tyrosine hydroxylase neurons in their medullas, according to a study in the Dec. 14 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. The finding sheds light on Rett syndrome, a severe neurological condition seen in one in 10,000 children, mostly females, that is characterized by mental retardation and respiratory problems.

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Pacifiers Reduce Risk of Sudden Infant Death By 90%

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Pacifiers substantially reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), according to a study published online Dec. 9 in the British Medical Journal.

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ICU Staff Can Cut Work Hours with 14-Hour Shift Schedule

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Changing the "long-call" schedule for interns, residents and fellows to a 14-hour work shift can reduce the number of work hours without compromising patient care, according to a report in the December issue of Chest.

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Single Embyro Transfer Leads to Successful Pregnancies

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The transfer of a single embryo in an in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle can result in the same pregnancy rates as a two-embryo transfer and significantly reduce the numbers of twins conceived, according to two studies published in the December issue of Fertility and Sterility.

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Universal Pertussis Vaccine Urged for Adolescents

THURSDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a new policy Wednesday recommending universal vaccination for pertussis at 11 to 12 years of age, and catch-up vaccinations of older adolescents.

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Allergy to Vegetable Oil Components Seen in Children

THURSDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Turnip and oilseed rape are common plants used in vegetable oil production and should be added to the list of potential food allergens for children with atopic dermatitis, according to a study in the January issue of Allergy.

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Allergist Care Associated with Improved Asthma Control

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Asthmatics treated by allergists have better outcomes than those treated by primary care providers, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Bacterial Sources of Endotoxin in Dust Mites Identified

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- House dust mite DNA contains evidence of Bartonella and other Gram-negative species, which are the likely sources of endotoxin found in mite allergenic extracts, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Over 150 Flu-Related Deaths in U.S. Children in 2003-2004

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Although most influenza-related deaths occur among the elderly, an analysis suggests that over 150 children died from the flu in the United States during the 2003-2004 season, most of them younger than age 5. The results of the study are published in the Dec. 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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B. cereus Outbreak Caused Scalp Infections in Cadets

MONDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Primary cutaneous disease attributed to Bacillus cereus rarely occurs in immunocompetent persons or in nonhealth-care settings, but an outbreak of the disease occurred among healthy cadets enrolled in a Georgia military program, according to a report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in their Dec. 9 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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FDA Warns Paxil Could Increase Risk of Birth Defects

MONDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned that Paxil (paroxetine) could increase the risk of birth defects, particularly cardiac defects, if taken during the first three months of pregnancy. Paxil should not be taken during pregnancy unless other treatment options are not available, the FDA said in a statement.

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Cochlear Implants at Early Age Help Link Sight, Sound Stimuli

MONDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Children who receive cochlear implants at an early age are more likely to acquire the ability to perceive speech by linking visual information from lip movements with auditory stimuli, according to a report published Dec. 5 online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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Physician Says Cetaphil Effective in Treating Head Lice

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Cetaphil Cleanser, available over the counter, is the simple and effective treatment for head lice mentioned in a September 2004 study in Pediatrics, according to a letter published this month.

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Physicians May Overestimate Time Spent with Patients

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Family physicians spend 39% of their office-based time working outside the traditional examination room, but 61% of that time is related to medical care, according to a study published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Mother's Attitude Affects Adolescent Weight Perception

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who place importance on weight status are likely to have children who are preoccupied with being thinner and dieting to get there, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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New Tool Can Quickly Assess Patients' Health Literacy

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A new health literacy test lets health care professionals quickly screen patients in English or Spanish, according to a study in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Independent Practice Boosts Physician Job Satisfaction

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians working in independent practices are happier with their jobs than those working for large health care organizations, according to a report published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Testicular Torsion Increases Risk of Orchiectomy

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Because testicular torsion is more common than testicular cancer in males aged 1 to 25 years and increases the risk of orchiectomy, boys should be educated from an early age about testicular torsion, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Personal Fulfillment Motivates Adolescents to Get Fit

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Personal fulfillment, including such factors as enjoyment of physical activity and a desire to become fit, is what motivates most adolescents to become physically active, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Obesity Increases Risk of Pregnancy Complications

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women have up to a fivefold higher risk of maternal complications, including hypertension and wound infection, compared with normal-weight women, according to a study published in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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FDA Seizes Ephedra-Containing Supplements

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Citing potential hazards to the heart, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday seized almost 3,000 bottles of Nature's Treat Energy Plus #1, an ephedra-containing dietary supplement from two distributors in Texas and Oregon.

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Malaria Resistance Stems from Uncontrolled Artemisinin Use

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Artemisinin-resistant strains of malaria have been found in French Guiana and Senegal, where use of the drug is uncontrolled, according to a report in the Dec. 3 issue of The Lancet. The report indicates the need for increased vigilance and coordination in drug deployment.

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Childhood Headache Often Persists into Adulthood

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who experience headaches in early childhood are likely to continue having them much later in life, researchers report in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Risks from Frequent Childhood Moves Linked to Home Life

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The health risks previously associated with frequent mobility in childhood may be due to the increased number of adverse experiences these children endure, according to a report in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Genital Herpes Linked to Perinatal HIV Transmission

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women infected with HIV may be more likely to vertically transmit the virus if they also have genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection, according to a study in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Some Injured Children Have Long-Term Impairment

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Eight percent of injured children have some long-term residual impairment, with girls three times more likely than boys to experience long-lasting problems, according to the results of a Dutch study published in the December issue of Pediatrics.

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Policy Targets Disordered Eating in Youth Athletes

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Alarmed by unhealthy weight-control practices among youths, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has issued a new policy statement promoting healthy weight control for young athletes. The policy is published in the December issue of Pediatrics.

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Body Weight Rises with Poor Nutrition Policies in School

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The body mass index of children increases 10% with each additional food-related policy permitted by schools, with the most common being the use of food as incentive in the classroom and in fundraising, according to a Minnesota study published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. The researchers call for a higher level of nutritional integrity in schools.

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Prescribing Antibiotics Does Not Save Pediatrician Time

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Prescribing an antibiotic does not streamline office encounters for physicians treating children with presumed viral upper respiratory infections, according to a report in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Study Sheds Light on Families Prone to Preterm Delivery

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- An analysis of families with multiple preterm deliveries suggests that the tendency may be inherited, according to study results published in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology. The Utah families with preterm deliveries were more closely related than families selected at random from a large genealogical database.

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Hearing Problems Associated with Otitis Media Surgery

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Tympanic membrane pathologic abnormalities and elevated hearing thresholds are more common in children who receive ventilation tube (VT) treatment for otitis media than in children who receive medical treatment, according to research published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Bed-Wetting Associated with Developmental Delays

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Bed-wetting in young children may indicate a delay in the development of their central nervous system, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Studies Show Few Side Effects from Smallpox Vaccines

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Serious side effects from smallpox vaccines, including neurologic reactions, appear to be mild and limited, according to two reports in the Dec. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Few Adverse Side Effects Seen with Intranasal Flu Vaccine

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Widespread use of live, attenuated intranasal flu vaccine has not caused unexpected serious risks when used as recommended in the first two flu seasons after licensure, according to a study in the Dec. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Parents May Be Less Likely to Sue with Error Disclosure

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Ninety-nine percent of parents prefer that pediatricians immediately disclose any medical errors, according to the results of a questionnaire survey published in the December issue of Pediatrics. What's more, this is true regardless of a parent's age or ethnicity.

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Preprinted Order Forms Reduce Pediatric Drug Errors

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Incorporating a structured, preprinted medication order form into emergency department practice can reduce the number of pediatric medication errors, according to the results of a study in the December issue of Pediatrics.

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Group B Streptococcal Disease Drops in Newborns

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of group B streptococcal (GBS) disease in newborn infants dropped by 31% between 2000-2001 and 2004 after universal screening was introduced, according to the Dec. 2 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Black infants remain at highest risk for both early-onset and late-onset GBS disease.

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Half of American Moms Opt Out of Breast-Feeding

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Half of U.S. mothers studied during a two-year period either did not initiate breast-feeding or stopped breast-feeding within one month, according to study findings published in the December issue of Pediatrics.

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Enlargement of Cerebral Matter in Children with Autism

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- There is a generalized enlargement of gray and white matter cerebral volumes in young children with autism, although cerebellar volume remains normal, according to a study in the December issue of Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Zinc Supplements Can Curb Morbidity in Children with HIV

MONDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- South African children infected with HIV can benefit from zinc supplementation, not because it reduces viral load but because it can reduce morbidity, particularly the incidence of watery diarrhea. The study findings are published in the Nov. 26 issue of The Lancet.

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Low-Fat Diet for Infant Boys Pays Off Later

MONDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A low-fat diet introduced in infancy and maintained for 10 years boosts boys' endothelial function and cuts their serum cholesterol, according to a study published online Dec. 5 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Mother's Prenatal Weight Linked to Childhood Obesity

MONDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Women who are obese before becoming pregnant are more likely than non-obese women to have children who are overweight at an early age, according to a study in the December issue of Pediatrics. Women who are black, Hispanic and those who smoke during pregnancy are also more likely to have obese children, the researchers found.

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FDA Issues Warning on Radiodiagnostic Agent

MONDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that a radiodiagnostic agent, NeutroSpec (Technetium [99m Tc] fanolesomab), has been linked to two deaths due to cardiopulmonary failure and other cases of life-threatening cardiopulmonary events.

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Psychotherapy Arms Youths Against PTSD

MONDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Targeted psychotherapy reduced post-traumatic stress in adolescent disaster survivors, according to a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Household Endotoxins Raise Asthma Risk

FRIDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of bacterial endotoxins found in household dust raise the risk of asthma, but have no effect on the prevalence of allergies, according to a nationwide survey in the December issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Total Lymphocytes Predict HIV Progression in Children

THURSDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Total lymphocyte count is only slightly less powerful than CD4 cell count as a predictor of disease progression in HIV-infected children, and could be an easier way to gauge the need for antiretroviral therapy in resource-poor nations, researchers reported in the Nov. 26 issue of The Lancet.

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Physician's Briefing