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November 2006 Briefing - Pediatrics

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for November 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Over Half of Obese Teens Are Insulin Resistant

THURSDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Some 52.1 percent of obese adolescents are insulin resistant, according to the results of a population-based study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Young Smokers Have Higher Alcoholism Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers who smoke cigarettes are more likely to abuse alcohol than non-smoking teens, researchers report in the December issue of Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

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Bee-Pollen Seen As Risky for Allergy Patients

THURSDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Although often used as an alternative medicine or food supplement, bee-pollen usage by atopic patients could be dangerous, researchers report in the November issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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Exercise May Curb Snoring in Overweight Children

THURSDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Energetic aerobic exercise helps control snoring and general sleep-disordered breathing problems in overweight children, researchers report in the November issue of Obesity.

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Pediatric Ocular Acne Rosacea Cases Described

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Ocular acne rosacea should be considered as a possible diagnosis in children with meibomian gland dysfunction and chronic blepharitis, chalazia, photophobia, ocular irritation, and redness that does not respond to treatment. Systemic antibiotics may be effective for such children, according to a report in the November issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

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Inhibiting Receptor Prevents Craniosynostosis in Mice

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Blocking the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (Fgfr2) pathway could help in treatment of craniosynostosis and other bone disorders, according to a report published online Nov. 28 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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Gene Mutation Is Main Cause of Harlequin Ichthyosis

TUESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in the ABCA12 gene have been found in additional patients with harlequin ichthyosis, more firmly establishing the gene as the main cause of the disease, according to a report in the November issue of the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. The finding could lead to prenatal or preimplantation genetic tests for carriers of the mutation.

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Fluticasone May Improve Eosinophilic Esophagitis

TUESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Oral doses of fluticasone propionate can reduce symptoms and promote histologic remission in pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, according to the results of a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled trial published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Researchers Question Benefit of Fetal Oximetry

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Clinician awareness of fetal oxygen saturation does not lead to a reduced rate of Caesarean delivery or improvements in the condition of newborns, researchers report in the Nov. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Avian Flu Clusters Found in Turkey and Indonesia

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Clusters of human H5N1 virus infection have been identified in Turkey and Indonesia, although the diagnoses in Turkey were at first difficult to make, according to two studies published in the Nov. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Eye Tests Predict Preterm Children's Vision Problems

MONDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In preterm children, retinoscopy performed around age 2.5 years may help detect astigmatism and anisometropia that persists through childhood, according to the results of a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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New Guidelines for Status Epilepticus in Children

MONDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- For children with treated epilepsy who develop status epilepticus, physicians should consider testing for levels of anti-epileptic drugs, which are low in 32 percent of children, according to guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology and the Child Neurology Society. The guidelines are published in the Nov. 14 issue of Neurology.

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Regular Smoking in Childhood Linked to Asthma

THURSDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Children and adolescents who report regular smoking have a nearly fourfold risk for developing asthma, according to a report in the Nov. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Inherited Metabolic Disorders Affect 800 Annually in U.K.

TUESDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In the United Kingdom, there are approximately 800 new cases a year of inherited metabolic disorders (IMD) -- substantially more than previously recorded -- covering a wide range of conditions, according to a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Asthma Ups Acute Chest Syndrome, Pain in Sickle Cell

FRIDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Children with sickle cell anemia who also have asthma have a higher incidence of acute chest syndrome and pain than those without asthma, researchers report in the Nov. 1 issue of Blood.

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Periorificial Dermatitis Strikes Children of All Ages

FRIDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Periorificial dermatitis affects children and adolescents of all ages and may be associated with topical steroid use, according to the findings of a retrospective chart review published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Laser Aids Biventricular Systolic Function in Twin-Twin Syndrome

THURSDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Selective laser ablation improves the cardiovascular pathology of the recipient twin in twin-twin transfusion syndrome, according to the results of a new study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Menstrual Cycle Is Important Vital Sign in Young Females

THURSDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The menstrual cycle can be an additional vital sign to help clinicians assess normal development and exclude certain pathological conditions in young female patients, according to a new report by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists that appears in the November issue of Pediatrics.

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Premature Infants More Likely to Have Behavior Problems

THURSDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Infants born very preterm (less than 32 weeks' gestation) or very low birth weight (less than 1,500 g) are more likely than their full-term and normal birth weight counterparts to experience social and behavioral difficulties at school age, researchers report in the November issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition.

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Chloroquine Returns as Anti-Malarial Drug in Malawi

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The anti-malarial drug chloroquine, withdrawn by Malawi in 1993 because of declining efficacy, may once again be an effective treatment, according to study findings published in the Nov. 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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White Curtains Boost Neonatal Jaundice Phototherapy

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of white reflecting curtains to a neonatal phototherapy unit increases the efficacy of the treatment for neonatal jaundice with no side effects and at low cost, according to a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition.

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Persistent Dermatitis Related to Egg Sensitivity

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- While most children eventually outgrow atopic dermatitis, children with an early sensitivity to eggs are more likely to have persistent atopic dermatitis than those with other types of allergy, researchers report in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. What's more, such children are also at greater risk of developing asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis by adolescence or young adulthood.

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Prolonged Bottle-Feeding May Lead to Iron Depletion

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Daytime bottle-feeding in the second and third years of life may be a risk factor for iron depletion, according to a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Poison Control Centers Can Prevent Hospitalizations

TUESDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Calls to poison control centers can prevent hospitalizations for poisoning in rural areas, with an estimated 43.3 calls preventing one hospitalization and saving a net $7,321, researchers report in the November issue of Pediatrics.

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Rate of Non-Fatal School Bus Injuries Higher Than Thought

TUESDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- More children are involved in non-fatal school bus-related injuries each year than previously reported, according to study findings published in the November issue of Pediatrics.

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Child's IQ Linked to Trauma Exposure, Post-Trauma Stress

TUESDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Children with higher IQs are less likely than other children to experience trauma, or to have long-term effects such as post-traumatic stress disorder after a traumatic incident, according to a report in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Anabolic Steroids Linked to Criminal Activity

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Use of anabolic androgenic steroids may be associated with an increased risk for criminal activity, according to a report in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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U.S. Adults Favor Balanced Sex Education Programs

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- American adults of all political stripes support comprehensive sex education programs that teach children about abstinence and other ways to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, according to a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Obesity at Age 10 Linked to Earlier Puberty in Boys

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) in 10-year-old boys is a significant predictor of age at puberty, with each unit increase in BMI linked to a 6-week reduction in the age of peak height velocity, researchers report in the November issue of Diabetes. In addition, an early puberty is associated with a central fat distribution in young adulthood.

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Iron-Deficient Infants Have Persistent Cognitive Deficit

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Infants who are iron deficient have lower cognitive test scores than those with sufficient iron levels, and the gap persists into the teenage years, especially for children at lower socioeconomic levels, according to a report published in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Study Finds U.S. Children Watch Too Much TV

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Children are watching more television than the two hours a day maximum currently recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, according to a report in the November issue of Pediatrics. The average child in the study watched three hours of TV a day and households had an average of four TV sets, often in the kitchen, dining room or child's bedroom.

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Hot Air Cures Head Lice Infestation

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Hot air seems to be a safe and effective treatment for head lice, and one method of heat application was 100 percent effective at curing lice infestation after a single 30-minute treatment, according to a report in the November issue of Pediatrics.

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Flu-Related Costs in Children Underestimated

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of influenza-related hospitalizations in children may be higher than previously estimated, according to a report in the November issue of Pediatrics.

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Teenagers' Attitudes About Sex Similar Worldwide

FRIDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Safe-sex programs aimed at young people must take into account social factors and teenagers' attitudes if they are to succeed, according to a study published in the Nov. 4 issue of The Lancet. The study found strong similarities between the factors that affect the sexual behavior of teens in different countries.

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Radiation Therapy Affects Childhood Cancer Survivors

THURSDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood cancer survivors who were treated with radiation may face an increased risk of brain and spinal column tumors, according to a report in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Youth Anti-Smoking Ads Can Have Opposite Effect

THURSDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Tobacco company-funded ads aimed at curbing youth smoking do not seem to work, and when directed at parents, such ads may actually increase the risk of smoking among teens, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Study Links SSRIs with Fewer Child Suicides

THURSDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's recent black box warning about the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in children, a nationwide observational study suggests more SSRI prescriptions are associated with fewer suicides in children and that there might be more suicides without SSRI use, researchers report in the November issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Commercial HMOs Embrace Pay-for-Performance Programs

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Pay-for-performance programs are now used by a majority of commercial health maintenance organizations, according to a special report published in the Nov. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Sildenafil Stops Rebound Hypertension in Children

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Single-dose, prophylactic sildenafil prevents rebound pulmonary arterial hypertension in children after weaning from inhaled nitric oxide, and decreases mechanical ventilation duration, according to research published in the November issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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