September 2013 Briefing - Pediatrics

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for September 2013. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Lower National Health Spending Due to Slow Economy

MONDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- National health care expenditures remain sluggish but are expected to grow at a rate of approximately 6.2 percent per year after 2014, with federal, state, and local governments accounting for half, according to research published online Sept. 18 in Health Affairs.

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Only One-Third of Voters Think Congress Should Delay ACA

MONDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- With a government shutdown impending, only one-third of voters think that Congress should delay, defund, or repeal the health care laws set to take effect imminently, according to a report from The Morning Consult.

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Medicare, Medicaid Will Still Run If Government Shuts Down

MONDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- According to U.S. officials, veterans and Medicare and Medicaid recipients will continue to receive health care benefits even if the federal government shuts down on Tuesday.

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No Change in Admissions for Pediatric Sports-Related TBI

MONDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Over the last 10 years there has been an increase in the number of emergency department visits for sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children, but no increase in the percentage of children admitted, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in Pediatrics.

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Trends in Psychotropic Med Use in Young Children Explored

MONDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- For children aged 2 to 5 years, the likelihood of psychotropic medication use peaked in 2002 to 2005, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in Pediatrics.

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Non-Medical Exemptions One Factor in Pertussis Resurgence

MONDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Non-medical exemptions (NMEs) are likely to have been one of the factors that contributed to the resurgence of pertussis in California in 2010, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in Pediatrics.

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DOL Clarifies Employer Health Insurance Notification Duty

MONDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Labor has provided clarification in the form of a frequently-asked-questions (FAQ) document, relating to employer obligations to provide employees with written notice about the Affordable Care Act's health insurance marketplaces by Oct. 1, 2013.

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Health Worker Roles Impacted When 'Undervalued' by Patients

FRIDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Job satisfaction among nurse practitioners and other professionals can suffer when clientele lack a clear understanding of what they do, according to research published in the Aug. 1 issue of the Academy of Management Journal.

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Practical Tips Offered for Medical Employee Satisfaction

FRIDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Managing staff is a learned skill, and one for which physicians are often ill-equipped. An article published Sept. 25 in Medical Economics lays out some practical tips and advice for motivating staff to excel.

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HEALTH REFORM: ACA Impact on Medicare Recipients Unclear

FRIDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The Affordable Care Act (ACA) will help millions of uninsured Americans access affordable health care coverage, but it's unclear what effect the law will have on people covered by Medicare.

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No Association Seen Between Celiac Disease, Autism Disorders

FRIDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There is no association between celiac disease and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), although there may be an increased risk of ASDs in patients with normal lining of the gastrointestinal tract but a positive antibody test, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Disparity Seen in Pain Tx for Kids in ER for Abdominal Pain

FRIDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Racial disparities exist in the use of analgesics in pediatric patients in the emergency department presenting with abdominal pain, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Bariatric Surgery in T1DM Teens Doesn't Aid Glycemic Control

THURSDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Despite significant weight loss, improvements in cardiovascular risk factors, and quality of life, bariatric surgery does not necessarily lead to improved glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), according to a case report published online Sept. 23 in Pediatrics.

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HEALTH REFORM: Medicaid Expansion Will Up Coverage

THURSDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Two aspects of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) have the potential to extend health insurance coverage to those who do not qualify for government-sponsored health care but cannot afford to purchase private plans.

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CDC: Flu Shot Coverage of Health Care Personnel Increasing

THURSDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination coverage has increased among health care personnel but varies by occupation type and occupational setting, according to a report published in the Sept. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Tx Recommendations Updated

THURSDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations for treatment of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), including those cases with or without active systemic features, have been updated to reflect an extensive literature review and evaluation of more than 1,000 scenarios, according to a special article published in the October issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Antibiotic Protocol Selects Against Drug Resistance

THURSDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Cycling between antibiotics can select against the development of drug resistance, according to a study published in the Sept. 25 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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More Options, Lower Premiums With Insurance Exchanges

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Consumers are likely to find insurance options more plentiful and more affordable than expected in the new Health Insurance Marketplace that goes into effect Oct. 1, according to a report released Sept. 25 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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HEALTH REFORM: Exchanges Offer Options for the Uninsured

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of part-time, seasonal, self-employed workers and other individuals currently without health insurance may find a solution to their vulnerable status when the new health care exchanges go into effect on Oct. 1.

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Dextrose Gel Reverses Hypoglycemia in Neonates

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Dextrose gel may be used to manage hypoglycemia in late preterm and term babies in the first 48 hours following birth, according to research published online Sept. 25 in The Lancet.

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Prenatal Antiepileptic Drugs Affect Fine Motor Skills in Infants

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs is associated with impaired fine motor skills at 6 months of age, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in JAMA Neurology.

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New Survey Tool Predicts Immunization Status

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The Parent Attitudes About Childhood Vaccines survey (PACV) predicts the immunization status of children with high reliability, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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ACP Provides Overview of Health Insurance Marketplaces

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The opportunities and challenges presented by health care reform are discussed in an article published online Sept. 24 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Mother-Infant Bedsharing Promotes Breastfeeding

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Duration of breastfeeding is longer for mothers who frequently lie down and sleep with their infants for major sleep periods, according to research published online Sept. 23 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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HEALTH REFORM: Health Care Reform a Mixed Bag for Workers

TUESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Much discussion of the Affordable Care Act revolves around the dramatic changes in store for America's uninsured, but the health care reform law will also have an impact on individuals with employer-based coverage.

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FDA Gives Final Guidance on Mobile Medical App Oversight

TUESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued final guidance for mobile application (app) developers, and is focusing its oversight on medical apps that will be used as accessories to regulated medical devices, or that transform a mobile device into a regulated medical device.

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Model Can Predict Preemie Neonatal Outcome Severity

TUESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A statistical prediction model comprising eight characteristics can be used to determine the severity of neonatal outcomes for infants born at 23 to 30 weeks of gestation, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Breastfeeding Concerns Prevalent Among New Mothers

TUESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Almost all new mothers experience breastfeeding concerns in the early postpartum period, and these are associated with stopping breastfeeding, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Early Screening Tool IDs PTSD in Preschool-Aged Children

TUESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- An early screening tool can be used to identify posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in infants and young children shortly after unintentional injury, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Unlike Adults, No Decline Seen in MRSA Infections in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In contrast to decreasing incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in adults, no significant reductions in health care-associated MRSA infections, and increasing incidence of community-acquired MRSA infections, have been reported in children, according to research published online Sept. 23 in Pediatrics.

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FDA Issues Final Rule for Device Identification System

MONDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has released a final rule for the unique device identification system (UDI) that, when implemented, will improve patient safety by providing a consistent way to identify approved medical devices.

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Infectious Endocarditis Risk ID'd in Congenital Heart Disease

MONDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For children with congenital heart disease (CHD), the risk of infectious endocarditis (IE) is 6.1 per 1,000 children, and predictors include cyanotic CHD, endocardial cushion defects, and left-sided lesions, according to a study published in the Sept. 24 issue of Circulation.

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HEALTH REFORM: Young People Likely to Be Key to Success

MONDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Young, healthy adults are considered key to the success of health insurance reform, but many are not even aware of state insurance exchanges.

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HEALTH REFORM: Health Care Exchanges Going Into Effect

MONDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- As of Oct. 1, consumers looking for health insurance will be able to turn to state-based health care exchanges, a centerpiece of the Affordable Care Act intended to help the uninsured and small businesses find affordable coverage.

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Bioethicist Discusses Targeting Parents of Obese Children

MONDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of obese children should be targeted in an effort to deal with a serious national problem, according to a viewpoint piece published in the September issue of JAMA Pediatrics.

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Majority of U.S. Consumers Want Full Access to EMR

MONDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Most U.S. consumers want to have full access to their electronic medical records (EMR), and 41 percent would be willing to switch doctors to gain access, according to a survey published by Accenture.

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Countries Urged to Step Up Efforts to Reduce Child Deaths

FRIDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Historical trends in coverage of interventions to improve maternal, newborn, and child health indicate that targets for child and neonatal mortality will not be met by 2035, according to research published in the Sept. 21 issue of The Lancet.

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New Medicaid Enrollees Under ACA May Be Healthier

THURSDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adults potentially eligible for Medicaid under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) are expected to have equal or better health status than current beneficiaries, according to research published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Millions Are Harmed by Unsafe Medical Care Each Year

THURSDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adverse events caused by inferior medical care are a major source of morbidity and mortality globally, according to research published in the October issue of BMJ Quality & Safety.

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Pros and Cons of Shortening Medical School Discussed

THURSDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The pros and cons of shortening medical school to three years are discussed in two perspective pieces published in the Sept. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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'Bath Salts' Involved in Nearly 23,000 ER Visits in 2011

THURSDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Bath salts, a group of drugs that contain one or more chemicals related to the amphetamine-like stimulant cathinone, were involved in nearly 23,000 drug-related emergency department visits in 2011, according to a report published by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Binge Drinking 5+ Drinks Common in High School Seniors

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- One in five U.S. high school seniors report binge drinking at the traditionally defined 5+ drinking level in the past two weeks, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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EHR Systems Meeting Meaningful Use Criteria Beneficial

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Most electronic health record (EHR) systems meet meaningful use criteria, and these systems are associated with time-saving and other benefits, according to a September data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Dual Epidural Analgesia Most Effective for Scoliosis Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Dual continuous epidural analgesia (CEA) is the most effective pain control method following surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of Spine.

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Payment for Routine Office Visits Varies Substantially

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- There is substantial variation in private insurance payment to physicians for routine office visits, according to research published in the September issue of Health Affairs.

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Researchers Estimate Costs of Childhood Food Allergies

TUESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood food allergies result in significant direct medical costs for the U.S. health care system and even larger total costs for families of food-allergic children, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Livestock Industrial Agriculture Exposure Ups Odds of MRSA

TUESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to swine and dairy/veal industrial agriculture is associated with increased odds of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection; and, the incidence of health care-associated community-onset (HACO) and hospital-onset MRSA infections has decreased since 2005, according to two studies published online Sept. 16 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Care Pathway Proposed for Adolescent Depression

TUESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have gathered evidence, developed a care pathway, and identified quality indicators (QIs) for the management of adolescent depression, according to a special article published online Sept. 16 in Pediatrics.

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More Than 1.6 Million Americans Expected to Get Cancer in 2013

TUESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Although significant progress has been made in treating cancer, more than 1.6 million Americans are projected to receive a cancer diagnosis in 2013, according to the third American Association for Cancer Research's Cancer Progress Report 2013.

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Health Insurance Disparities for Children of Same-Sex Parents

MONDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For children with same-sex parents, disparities in private health insurance are attenuated when they live in states that protect their legal relationship to both parents, according to research published online Sept. 16 in Pediatrics.

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CDC Report Sheds Light on Antibiotic-Resistant Infections

MONDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotic-resistant infections claim the lives of 23,000 people in the United States every year and take a tremendous financial toll on the already overburdened health care system, according to a report issued Sept. 16 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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More Than 150 Measles Cases in U.S. Through August 2013

MONDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- From Jan. 1 to Aug. 24, 2013, there were 159 cases of measles in 16 states in the United States, mainly resulting from eight outbreaks, according to a report published in the Sept. 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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U.S. Teens Have Improved Health Behaviors, but BMI Up

MONDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Improvements were observed in obesity-related behaviors of U.S. adolescents between 2001 and 2009, but further research is needed to explain the increase seen in body mass index (BMI) during the same time period, according to research published online Sept. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Analysis Confirms Bullying, Health Issues Link in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Results of a recent meta-analysis confirm previous findings that being bullied is associated with psychosomatic problems in school-aged children; the research has been published online Sept. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Kids With Neuro Disorders No More Likely to Get Flu Vaccine

MONDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Although children with neurologic conditions are at high risk for complications of influenza infection, only half were vaccinated during the 2011 to 2012 influenza season, according to a report published in the Sept. 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Nearly a Third of Vaccines at Pharmacies Given Off-Hours

FRIDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Almost one-third of vaccinations given to adults at community pharmacies are administered during off-clinic hours, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Residual Sleep Apnea Common After Adenotonsillectomy

FRIDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For children younger than 3 years with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), residual OSA is relatively common after adenotonsillectomy (T&A), according to a study published online Sept. 12 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

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IOM Urges Coordinated Research Enterprise for Child Abuse

FRIDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Although child abuse rates appear to be declining, the complexity of child abuse and neglect necessitates development of a coordinated research enterprise, according to a report published Sept. 12 by the Institute of Medicine.

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Community-Level Intervention Cuts Antibiotic Prescribing

FRIDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A community-level intervention targeting residents and health care professionals can influence antibiotic prescribing for outpatients, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in BMJ.

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Elective Induction at Term Tied to Lower Odds of Cesarean

THURSDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with expectant management, elective induction at term (37 to 40 weeks of gestation) is associated with reduced likelihood of cesarean delivery, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Most Children in U.S. Receiving Recommended Vaccinations

THURSDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Most children in the United States are being immunized against vaccine-preventable diseases at the nationally accepted target rate, but coverage lags in some states and in children whose family incomes fall at or below the federal poverty level, according to a report published in the Sept. 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Mindfulness Training Beneficial for Clinicians, Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness training is associated with improvements in physician burnout; and, clinicians who rate themselves as more mindful engage in more patient-centered communication, according to two studies published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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U.K. Nursing Students Report Seeing Lax Infection Control

THURSDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- U.K. nursing students report a solid understanding of infection control policies and compliance, or lack thereof, based on preclinical classroom instruction, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Alcohol Consumption Prevalent in Early Pregnancy in Ireland

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol consumption, including binge drinking, is common during early pregnancy among women in Ireland, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Maternal Opioid Use Ups Risk of Neural Tube Defects

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A higher rate of periconceptional opioid use has been observed among mothers of infants with neural tube defects, according to research published online Sept. 6 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Peds Revisit Rates Not Good Indicator of Hospital Quality

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with average performance, few hospitals caring for children are identified as low- or high-performers by condition-specific revisit rates, likely because of low hospital volumes, according to research published in the September issue of Pediatrics.

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Radiographic Findings Mirror Clinical Severity in H7N9 Flu

TUESDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with novel avian-origin influenza A H7N9 virus infection, radiological findings mirror the severity of the clinical presentation, according to a study published in the September issue of Radiology.

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Cardiac Imaging Not Useful for Screening Healthy Athletes

TUESDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The prognostic value of using cardiac imaging to screen healthy athletes is uncertain, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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Medicaid Funded Almost Half of All U.S. Births in 2010

TUESDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In 2010, Medicaid funded nearly half of all births in the United States, according to a study published in the September issue of Women's Health Issues.

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About Half of Health Care Providers Are 'Digital Omnivores'

TUESDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- About half of health care providers are "digital omnivores," meaning they use a tablet, smartphone, and laptop/desktop computer routinely in a professional capacity, according to a report published by Epocrates.

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Intervention in Home Routines May Improve Child Health

TUESDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A home-based intervention to encourage healthy habits, such as family meals, adequate sleep, and limited television time, may offer an approach to preventing child obesity in low-income families, according to research published online Sept. 9 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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AHA Defines 'Severely Obese' As New Risk Category for Youth

MONDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Severely obese is a newly defined class of risk which characterizes about 5 percent of U.S. children and teens, according to an American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement published online Sept. 9 in Circulation.

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Non-Medical Use of Prescription Drugs Drops in Young Adults

MONDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In its latest report, 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) describes the use of illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco in the teen and adult civilian population of the United States.

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'Meaningful Use' Achievement Not Uniform Across Hospitals

MONDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In regard to the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), achievement of "meaningful use" criteria is not uniform across all hospitals, according to a study published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

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Most Physicians Report Being Satisfied With Career Choice

MONDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians report being satisfied with their career choice, although 40 percent would rethink their path given the chance to choose again, according to the 2013 Great American Physician Survey published in Physicians Practice.

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CDC: U.S. Birth Rate Essentially Unchanged in 2012

MONDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In 2012, the U.S. birth rate was essentially unchanged, but decreases were noted in the rates for teenagers and women in their early 20s, according to a report published Sept. 6 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Obese Teens Can Also Develop Eating Disorders

MONDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Obese adolescents are at risk of eating disorders, which can go unrecognized due to their higher weight status, according to a case report published online Sept. 9 in Pediatrics.

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Adoption Linked to Increased Risk of Suicide Attempts

MONDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Adopted offspring have increased odds of a reported suicide attempt, even after adjustment for factors associated with suicidal behavior, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in Pediatrics.

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E-Cigarettes Modestly Effective for Helping Smokers Quit

MONDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are modestly effective for helping smokers quit; and, a three-month television antismoking campaign is effective for increasing quit attempts, according to two studies published online Sept. 9 in The Lancet.

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Parental Tongue-Lashing Aggravates Teen Misbehavior

FRIDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Harsh verbal discipline of children at age 13 by parents is linked with an increase in adolescent conduct problems and depressive symptoms, according to research published online Sept. 4 in Child Development.

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Telephone-Based Care Ups Pediatric Diabetes Management

FRIDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Telephone-based care for pediatric diabetes management is a cost-effective approach to reducing care disparities, according to research published online Aug. 19 in Diabetes Care.

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Electronic Cigarettes Gaining in Popularity Among Youths

FRIDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The impact of electronic cigarettes, also known as e-cigarettes, on those who use them is still unknown, but one thing is clear -- their popularity among U.S. youths has doubled in recent years, according to a report published in the Sept. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Physicians Rarely Remind Patients to Use Sunscreen

FRIDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians very rarely educate patients regarding the use of sunscreen and sun-protective behaviors, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Researchers Find Online Scoliosis Info Is Poor Quality

FRIDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The quality of web-based information on scoliosis is poor, according to a study published in the Aug. 15 issue of Spine.

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CDC: U.S. Drinking Water Sanitation Still a Concern

THURSDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Sanitation and water management in the United States has improved, but potentially preventable outbreaks of drinking water-associated disease, sometimes fatal, still occur, according to a report published in the Sept. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Drug Non-Adherence Linked to Greater Pediatric Health Care Use

THURSDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In children and adolescents with chronic medical conditions, medication non-adherence is associated with greater health care use, including more hospitalizations and visits to the emergency department, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

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Maternal PTSD Tied to Increased Risk of Child Abuse

THURSDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to events such as serious accidents, assaults, war, or natural disasters are more likely to mistreat their children, even more than mothers with depression, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Continuation Phase Cognitive Therapy Beneficial in Depression

THURSDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with major depressive disorder, continuation phase cognitive therapy (C-CT) and fluoxetine prevent relapse; and, a cognitive behavioral prevention (CBP) program provides lasting benefits for some adolescents at risk for depressive disorders, according to two studies published online Sept. 4 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Intervention for NICU Moms Reduces Their Trauma, Anxiety

THURSDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- An intervention aimed at reducing parental trauma and redefining the parental experience for those with very premature newborns is both feasible and cost-effective, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

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Processing Speed Drops After Medulloblastoma Diagnosis

THURSDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Among key cognitive functions, processing speed (PS) shows the poorest outcomes five years after diagnosis of pediatric medulloblastoma, according to a study published online Aug. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Immunization Schedules Don't Impact PCV13 Immunogenicity

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The immunogenicity of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) is not significantly different for most serotypes when administered according to four different primary immunization schedules, according to a study published in the Sept. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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AAP Updates Recommendations for Flu Prevention in Children

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations for routine use of seasonal influenza vaccine in children have been updated, according to an American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

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Docs' Confidence in Diagnosis Unrelated to Diagnostic Accuracy

TUESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians' confidence in their diagnostic accuracy is not associated with actual diagnostic accuracy or with case difficulty, according to a study published online Aug. 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Male-Female Physician Earnings Gap Has Persisted for 20 Years

TUESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- For physicians, the male-female earnings gap has not changed significantly since 1987, according to a research letter published online Sept. 2 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Hydroxyurea Cost-Effective for Childhood Sickle Cell Anemia

TUESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Treating children with sickle cell anemia with hydroxyurea is associated with lower total medical costs (higher outpatient costs but lower inpatient costs) as compared to placebo, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

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Male Teens and Children at Higher Risk of Death Than Female Peers

TUESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Males have a higher likelihood of death from injuries and a variety of medical conditions than females among those under 20 years old, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

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Parental Goals Impact ADHD Treatment Preference

TUESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely to choose medication if the goal is academic achievement but more likely to choose behavior therapy if the goal is behavioral compliance, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

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Workaholics Have Poorer Physical and Mental Health

MONDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Workaholics, defined as those who work more than 50 hours per week, have reduced physical and mental well-being, according to researchers from Kansas State University.

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Employer-Based Health Insurance Premiums Rose Modestly in 2013

MONDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Employer-sponsored health insurance premiums rose only modestly in 2013, according to research published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

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