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September 2014 Briefing - Pediatrics

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for September 2014. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

40 States, District of Columbia Reporting Enterovirus D68

TUESDAY, Sept. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Forty states and the District of Columbia now have a total of 277 confirmed cases of Enterovirus D68, the severe respiratory illness that typically targets children, U.S. health officials are reporting.

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Antibiotic Use Before Age 2 Might Raise Obesity Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are given broad-spectrum antibiotics before the age of 2 may face a slightly higher risk of becoming obese during childhood, according to research published online Sept. 29 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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'Just-in-Time' Methodology Can Reduce Patient Waiting Times

MONDAY, Sept. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Having trainee physicians review cases prior to clinic hours can reduce patient waiting times, flow times, and clinic session times, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in Pain Medicine. The management process studied was first popularized by Toyota in Japan.

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AAP: Good Nutrition, Exercise Optimize Pediatric Bone Health

MONDAY, Sept. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians play an important role in fostering optimal bone health in children and adolescents, according to research published online Sept. 29 in Pediatrics.

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Charge Data Influence Patient Surgical Treatment Decisions

MONDAY, Sept. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- When presented with procedural charge data, people tend to choose the less expensive technique, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in the Annals of Surgery.

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AMA Launches Three Programs for Physician Wellness

MONDAY, Sept. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians' personal health is a global concern and three initiatives are being developed to encourage positive change, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Pediatricians Endorse IUDs, Implants for Teen Birth Control

MONDAY, Sept. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Long-acting contraceptive devices should be the first choice of birth control for teenage girls, new recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics state. The guidelines were published online Sept. 29 in Pediatrics.

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Experiences Trump Things, Even Before Purchase

FRIDAY, Sept. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People derive value from the anticipation of purchasing something, and this anticipation tends to be greater for an experiential purchase than for a material purchase, according to a study published online Aug. 21 in Psychological Science.

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Can Media Multitasking Alter Your Brain?

THURSDAY, Sept. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Multitasking with smartphones, laptop computers, and other media devices could change the structure of your brain, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in PLOS ONE.

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Meta-Analysis: Anti-TNF Therapy Deemed Safe for Children

THURSDAY, Sept. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy appears to be safe, according to research published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Family-Based Therapy Can Aid Those With Anorexia

THURSDAY, Sept. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Family-based therapies can benefit adolescents with anorexia nervosa, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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CDC: Enterovirus D68 in 29 States, District of Columbia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia now have a total of 213 confirmed cases of Enterovirus D68, the severe respiratory illness that typically targets children, U.S. health officials are reporting.

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Soda Giants Pledge to Make Calorie Cuts in Their Drinks

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The top U.S. soda makers have agreed to help reduce Americans' consumption of calories from sugary beverages by one-fifth during the next decade -- by shrinking drink sizes and marketing healthier options.

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CDC: U.S. Still Lags in Infant Mortality Rates

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More infants are dying before they turn 1 year old in the United States than in most of Europe and several other developed countries, a new U.S. government report indicates. A greater proportion of premature births and deaths of full-term infants are driving the higher rate, which puts the United States below 25 other countries, according to the report, released Sept. 24 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Diabetes Rates Leveling Off in the United States

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Overall adult diabetes rates appear to have leveled off during the past four years in the United States, in stark contrast to the two decades prior, which saw a doubling of the chronic disease, according to research published in the Sept. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Few Children Taking ADHD Drugs Also Getting Psychotherapy

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Few children who take medication for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder also undergo behavioral therapy, and the rates vary six-fold across counties in the United States, according to a research letter published online Sept. 22 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Report Identifies Game Changers for U.S. Health Care

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine if doctors and hospitals got paid for providing better care, not more care, and patients had better data for making informed health choices. A new report suggests that's the direction the U.S. health system is headed.

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Most Doctors Are Over-Extended or at Full Capacity

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians report being over-extended or at full capacity, according to a survey conducted by Merritt Hawkins for The Physicians Foundation.

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FDA Warns Doctors of Danger From 'Fake' Drugs

TUESDAY, Sept. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The number of "rogue" wholesale distributors selling fake or unapproved prescription drugs is growing, so doctors need to be vigilant when purchasing medicines, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Tuesday.

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Breast Milk a Risk for Spreading Cytomegalovirus to Preemies

TUESDAY, Sept. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For babies born at very low birth weights, breast milk is more likely than a blood transfusion to lead to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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USPSTF: Behavioral Counseling Recommended to Reduce STIs

TUESDAY, Sept. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- All sexually active adolescents and adults who are at increased risk for sexually transmitted infections should undergo "intensive" behavioral counseling to help prevent risky sexual behaviors (a B recommendation), according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. The final recommendation statement was published online Sept. 23 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Chikungunya Fever Identified in the United States

TUESDAY, Sept. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Chikungunya fever is being seen in travelers returning to the United States from affected regions and should be considered as a diagnosis for febrile travelers, according to an ideas and opinions piece published online Sept. 23 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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PCPs Reluctant to Offer Genetics Services to Patients

TUESDAY, Sept. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care providers (PCPs) perceive multiple barriers to provision of genetics services for their patients, according to research published online Sept. 11 in Genetics in Medicine.

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Low Iron Intake During Pregnancy Linked to Autism Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Taking iron supplements as prescribed may play a role in reducing the risk of having a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to research published online Sept. 22 in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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Many Parents Use Online Ratings to Pick a Pediatrician

MONDAY, Sept. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many American parents are aware of online physician-rating sites, and more than one-quarter have used them to choose a pediatrician for their children, according to a new national study published online Sept. 22 in Pediatrics.

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One in 15 Family Docs Focus Time on Emergency/Urgent Care

MONDAY, Sept. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately one in 15 family physicians spend at least 80 percent of their time in emergency or urgent care, with higher percentages seen for doctors in rural areas, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians. The findings were published in the July-August issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine.

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Redundant Antimicrobial Therapy Is Pervasive, Costly

MONDAY, Sept. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Redundant use of antimicrobial therapy is pervasive in U.S. hospitals and is associated with considerable, potentially avoidable, health care costs, according to a study published in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

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AAP Urges Flu Vaccine for All Children 6 Months and Older

MONDAY, Sept. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated their influenza vaccine recommendations and is urging vaccination for everyone 6 months of age and older. The recommendations were published online Sept. 22 in Pediatrics.

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Newborn ICUs With Private Family Rooms Benefit Preemies

MONDAY, Sept. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Preemies may fare better when newborn intensive care units (NICUs) set up private rooms for parents to spend time with their infants, according to research published online Sept. 22 in Pediatrics.

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Sales Influence Consumer Food Shopping Habits

FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Consumers are more likely to buy high-calorie foods (HCF), but not low-calorie foods (LCF) on sale, according to a study published in the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Systemwide Changes Needed to Restrain Health Care Spending

FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Systemwide changes are necessary to prevent excessive health care spending, and so are tools to help consumers make better, more informed medical choices, according to a white paper published in June by Vitals.

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Presence of Peers Ups Health Workers' Hand Hygiene

FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of other health care workers improves hand hygiene adherence, according to a study published in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

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Strategies Can Help Docs Lower Their Tax Burden

THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies are presented to help physicians lower their tax burden in an article published Sept. 2 in Medical Economics.

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CDC: Almost Everyone Needs a Flu Shot

THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half of all Americans got a flu shot last year, so U.S. health officials on Thursday urged that everyone 6 months and older get vaccinated for the coming flu season. "It's really unfortunate that half of Americans are not getting the protection from flu they could get," said Thomas Frieden, M.D., director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, during a morning news conference.

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12 States Now Reporting Severe Respiratory Illness Affecting Kids

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Twelve states now have confirmed cases of Enterovirus D68, the severe respiratory illnesses that may have sickened hundreds of children, U.S. health officials report.

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Internists Report Considerable EMR-Linked Time Loss

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Use of electronic medical record (EMR) systems is associated with considerable loss of free time per clinic day, according to a research letter published online Sept. 8 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Doctors Promoting Transparency With Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to increase transparency among doctors are underway, according to an article published in The Boston Globe.

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Prenatal Phthalate Exposure Tied to Asthma Risk in Children

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure in the womb to household chemicals known as phthalates might increase a child's future risk of developing asthma, according to research published online Sept. 17 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Long-Term Benefits Lacking for Magnesium Sulfate in Preemies

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although magnesium sulfate is routinely given to pregnant women at risk for very preterm delivery, new research suggests it won't provide any long-term benefits for infants. The new findings were published in the Sept. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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AHA/ACC: Routine ECGs Not Advised for Young Athletes

TUESDAY, Sept. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. heart experts recommend doctors use a 14-point checklist rather than an electrocardiogram (ECG) when evaluating young people for underlying heart disease that could result in sudden cardiac arrest.

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Fewer U.S. Teens Using Illegal Drugs and Alcohol

TUESDAY, Sept. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Illegal drug use among teens in the United States is on the decline, according to a new federal report. Alcohol use, binge drinking, and the use of tobacco products among young people between the ages of 12 and 17 also dropped between 2002 and 2013, according to the report from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Eight Percent of Children Account for 24 Percent of ER Visits

TUESDAY, Sept. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Eight percent of children account for nearly one-quarter of emergency department visits and 31 percent of costs, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Over a Quarter of Hospital Orders Classified As Defensive

TUESDAY, Sept. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-quarter of hospital medicine services were rated by ordering physicians as at least a partially defensive order, according to a research letter published online Sept. 15 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Children's Severe Respiratory Virus Confirmed in Northeast

MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The severe respiratory virus believed to have sickened hundreds of U.S. children in Midwestern and Western states has now spread to the Northeast, health officials report.

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Unsupervised Prescription Drug Intake Sends Many Children to ER

MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- From 2007 to 2011, there were nearly 10,000 emergency hospitalizations per year for unsupervised prescription medication ingestion by young children, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in Pediatrics.

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HPV Vaccine Knowledge Doesn't Predict Vaccination

MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Neither parents' nor adolescents' knowledge about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines predicts vaccination compliance, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Antimicrobial Prescriptions for Children Higher Than Expected

MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Just over one-quarter of U.S. children with acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI) have bacterial illness, yet antimicrobials are prescribed twice as frequently as expected during ARTI outpatient visits, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Many Primary Care Patients Will Use Personal Health Records

MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial proportion of primary care patients will use online personal health records that interact with the electronic health record, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Errata Frequently Seen in Medical Literature

MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Errata, including those that may materially change the interpretation of data, are frequent in medical publications, according to a study published in the August issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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New Role of Patient As Consumer Requires Market Changes

FRIDAY, Sept. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The new consumer retail market in U.S. health care is necessary and will benefit consumers, and as consumers take on more costs of care, access to information to help them make informed decisions is crucial, according to a recent white paper published by Vitals.

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Poverty Tied to Increased Respiratory Hospitalization Rate

FRIDAY, Sept. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Household income is tied to significant differences in hospitalizations for ambulatory-care-sensitive respiratory conditions, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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AAFP Joins Coalition to Prevent Misuse of ADHD Meds

FRIDAY, Sept. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) has joined the Coalition to Prevent ADHD Medication Misuse (CPAMM), which launched Aug. 28.

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Adding Antipsychotic Med May Improve Behavior in ADHD

FRIDAY, Sept. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adding an antipsychotic medication, such as risperidone, to stimulant therapy and parent training may improve parent ratings for behavioral problems in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Opioid Overdose Prevention Needed in Young Adult Users

FRIDAY, Sept. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many young adult nonmedical prescription opioid (PO) users are relatively uninformed about overdose awareness, avoidance, and response strategies, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in The International Journal of Drug Policy.

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Demographics Impact Family Physicians' Care of Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Demographic and geographic factors influence whether family physicians provide care for children, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Physician Describes Impact of Malpractice Suit

THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A family doctor who was involved in a malpractice suit describes the impact on her practice of medicine in an article published online in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Fear About Disease Progression Prompts ER Returns

THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Perceived inability to access timely follow-up care and uncertainty and fear about disease progression are the main reasons for return visits to the emergency department, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Case Highlights Anaphylaxis Risk With Antibiotics in Foods

THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Anaphylactic reactions to antibiotics may occur after exposure via fruit consumption, according to a case study published in the September issue of the Annals of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology.

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White Matter Measure Predicts Longer Concussion Recovery

THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A measure of white matter in the brain, particularly in males, is an independent predictor of longer time to symptom resolution (TSR) after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), according to a study published in the September issue of Radiology.

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Technological Interventions Aid Weight Loss in Primary Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to usual care, technology-assisted weight loss interventions in the primary care setting help patients achieve more weight loss, according to research published online Aug. 19 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Review: Rapid Antigen Tests Accurate for Strep Diagnosis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Rapid antigen diagnostic tests (RADTs) can be used for accurate diagnosis of group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis for management of sore throat in primary care settings, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Pediatrics.

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CDC: Many U.S. Children Missing Out on Preventive Care

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of infants and children aren't receiving recommended medical care aimed at detecting and preventing disease, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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CDC: Nine of 10 American Kids Eat Too Much Salt

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Nine out of 10 American kids eat more salt than they should, raising their lifelong risk of high blood pressure and heart disease, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Recommendations Developed for Sickle Cell Disease

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence-based recommendations have been developed to support health care professionals who provide care for individuals with sickle cell disease. The summary of the 2014 evidence-based report by expert panel members was published online Sept. 9 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Long-Term Statins Benefit Familial Hypercholesterolemia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term statin use among children with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is associated with normalization of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) progression, according to a research letter published online Sept. 9 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Reanalyses of RCTs Can Lead to Different Conclusions

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-third of the small number of reanalyses of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have implied conclusions different from those of the original articles, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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For Some, Health Insurance More Costly Than Uninsured Penalty

TUESDAY, Sept. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For some young people in the United States, the cost of paying a penalty for not buying health insurance will be lower than the lowest-cost insurance, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Sleep Not Harmed by Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity

FRIDAY, Sept. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Caffeine administered for treatment of apnea in premature infants does not appear to have long-term detrimental effects on sleep during childhood, according to research published online Aug. 29 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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CDC: Respiratory Virus Affecting Children in Multiple States

TUESDAY, Sept. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A respiratory virus has stricken more than 1,000 children across several states, requiring hospitalization in some and prompting concerns of a wider outbreak, health officials reported Monday.

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Sibling Bullies May Leave Lasting Effects

MONDAY, Sept. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Being bullied by a sibling as a child is a potential risk factor for depression, self-harm, and anxiety in early adulthood, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Pediatrics.

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Renal and Thyroid Cancers on the Rise in U.S. Children

MONDAY, Sept. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of renal cancer and thyroid cancer is increasing among children and adolescents in the United States, according to research published online Sept. 8 in Pediatrics.

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Report Explores Patients' Portal Preferences

MONDAY, Sept. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patients want portals that include features such as appointment scheduling, viewing test results, and checking prescription refills, and are frustrated with unresponsive staff and poor interfaces, according to a report published by Software Advice.

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Before 2011 Guidelines, Lipid Screening Rates in Children Low

MONDAY, Sept. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In the years leading up to the 2011 guidelines on cardiovascular health, lipid screening was uncommon in 9- to 11-year-olds and was performed in a minority of 17- to 19-year-olds, according to a study published online Aug. 26 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Health Care-Linked Infections Down in Hospitalized Children

MONDAY, Sept. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- From 2007 to 2012 the incidence of health care-associated infections (HAIs) decreased among hospitalized children, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Pediatrics.

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Health Care Spending Expected to Rise in 2014 Through 2023

MONDAY, Sept. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- While health spending growth was slow in 2013, health spending is expected to increase in 2014 and remain higher through 2023, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Health Affairs.

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Serious Childhood Burns Tied to Long-Term Mental Health Risks

FRIDAY, Sept. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adult survivors of childhood burns are at increased risk for depression and suicidal thoughts, according to a new study published in the September issue of Burns.

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Nearly 10 Percent of Americans Admit to Illicit Drug Use

FRIDAY, Sept. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 10 percent of Americans aged 12 and older were illicit drug users in 2013, and almost 20 million said they used marijuana, making it the most widely used drug, U.S. health officials reported Thursday. Two states, Colorado and Washington, permit the recreational use of marijuana.

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Obesity Remains Rampant Across America

FRIDAY, Sept. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than 20 states have obesity rates topping one-third of their population, and six states saw a rise in obesity rates last year, according to two new reports released Thursday -- one from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the other from the Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

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Influenza Vaccine Immunogenic in HIV+ Pregnant Women

THURSDAY, Sept. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) provides protection against confirmed influenza in HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected pregnant women and in infants not exposed to HIV up to 24 weeks after birth, according to a study published in the Sept. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Blog: Seven Most Common Physician Social Media Misses

THURSDAY, Sept. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The most common physician social media misses and missteps can be avoided, allowing doctors to take advantage of marketing opportunities on all major social media channels, according to the author of a recent Vitals blog.

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Skin Cells Used to Create Heart Valve for Growing Kids

THURSDAY, Sept. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've found a way to use a child's skin cells to construct a new pulmonary valve. The findings appear in the September issue of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Pediatricians Have Important Role in Preoperative Process

THURSDAY, Sept. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians have an important part in preparing surgical patients and their families for procedures, according to a policy statement published online Aug. 25 in Pediatrics.

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E-Cigarette Vapor May Be Less Toxic Than Tobacco Smoke

THURSDAY, Sept. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Secondhand vapor created by one brand of electronic cigarette harbors fewer hazardous chemicals than regular cigarette smoke, although the researchers report the finding doesn't leave e-cigarettes in the clear. The study was published online Aug. 22 in Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts.

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CVS Halts Tobacco Sales

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- As of midnight Tuesday, all CVS locations across the United States stopped selling tobacco products.

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Cannabis Withdrawal Common in Substance Abusing Teens

TUESDAY, Sept. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who develop withdrawal symptoms from marijuana are more likely to meet the guidelines for marijuana dependence and for mood disorders, according to a new study published recently in the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

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Quality of U.S. Diet Improves, Slightly

TUESDAY, Sept. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The quality of Americans' diets has improved somewhat but remains poor overall, and dietary disparity between the rich and poor is growing, a new study shows. Education also played a role in dietary quality, which was lowest and improved more slowly among people who had 12 years or less of school, according to the study published online Sept. 1 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Family Meals May Defuse Cyberbullying's Impact

TUESDAY, Sept. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Having regular family meals may help protect teens from the harmful mental health effects of "cyberbullying," a new study suggests. The study was published online Sept. 1 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Maternal Gestational Diabetes Ups Daughters' Adiposity

TUESDAY, Sept. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Girls exposed to maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or hyperglycemia in utero have elevated risk of childhood adiposity, particularly if the mother is overweight or obese, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in Diabetes Care.

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ADHD Stimulant Rx Doesn't Significantly Affect Growth

TUESDAY, Sept. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) stimulant treatment in children is not associated with significant changes in growth, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Pediatrics.

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Physician's Briefing
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