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FDA: Teething Jewelry Linked to at Least One Infant Death

Threats from these products include choking, strangulation, injury to the mouth, infection

a baby chewing on a necklace

FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teething jewelry products, such as necklaces, pose significant safety risks and have been tied to at least one baby's death, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

Potential threats include choking, strangulation, injury to the mouth, and infection. These products should not be used to relieve teething pain in infants, the agency said. The products also should not be used to provide sensory stimulation for children or adults with autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, or other special needs, the agency added.

The FDA said it has received reports of infants and children suffering serious injuries due to teething jewelry, including one death. In that case, an 18-month-old child was strangled by his teething necklace during a nap.

There are various types of teething jewelry, including necklaces, bracelets, and anklets, which have beads made with materials such as amber, wood, marble, or silicone. Another potential hazard is a substance called succinic acid that is in amber teething necklaces. Manufacturers claim that this substance, which may be released into an infant's bloodstream in unknown amounts, is an anti-inflammatory agent and relieves teething and joint pain. But the FDA said those claims have not been evaluated for safety or effectiveness.

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