Acquire the license to the best health content in the world
Contact Us

March 2011 Briefing - Pharmacy

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pharmacy for March 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Tetanus Cases Rare but Some Populations More Vulnerable

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Tetanus cases and fatalities in the United States have decreased by more than 95 percent and more than 99 percent, respectively, since the disease became reportable in 1947, but sporadic cases do still occur, and some populations are more at risk for contracting the potentially life-threatening disease, according to research published in the April 1 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Growth Hormone Increases Adult Height in Turner's

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with growth hormone may result in greater adult height for girls with Turner's syndrome, and the addition of low-dose estrogen to the treatment regimen may further improve results, according to research published in the March 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Abortion by Certified Nurses Safe and Effective

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Medical abortions by midlevel providers (MLPs), up to nine weeks gestation, are as safe and effective as those provided by doctors, according to a study published online March 31 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Boceprevir Nets Higher Virologic Response in Hep C

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of boceprevir to the standard treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection appears to result in a higher rate of sustained virologic response both in patients who have never been treated and those who have received prior treatment, according to two studies published in the March 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text - Poordad (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text - Bacon (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA: Store Pradaxa Only in Original Containers

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- The anticoagulant dabigatran etexilate mesylate (Pradaxa), a direct thrombin inhibitor, should be dispensed and stored only in its original bottle or blister package because exposure to moisture may cause product breakdown and loss of potency, according to an alert issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Online Health Records Less Used by Minorities, Poor

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Online personal health records (PHRs) are less frequently used by racial or ethnic minorities and patients with low annual income, according to a study published in the March 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Insulin Delivery System Recalled by Roche

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- ACCU-CHEK FlexLink Plus infusion sets are being recalled by their manufacturer, Roche, because the tube used for inserting the set may become kinked or bent, which could result in the under-delivery or no delivery of insulin, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced.

More Information

Four-Dose Rabies Prevention Vaccine Schedule Endorsed

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention committee has proposed a reduced schedule for prophylactic rabies vaccine, and the recommendations have been endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, according to a policy statement published online March 28 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Conflicts of Interest Abound in Cardiology Guidelines

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicts of interest (COIs) are prevalent in cardiology clinical practice guidelines, but there is still a substantial number of experienced expert guideline writers and reviewers without COIs, according to a study published in the March 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Complementary Treatment of Colic Lacks Evidence

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence supporting the notion that complementary and alternative medicines may be useful for curing infantile colic is limited and of poor quality, according to a systematic review published online March 28 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Chemotherapeutic Agent Voluntarily Recalled

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Five lots of irinotecan hydrochloride injection are being voluntarily recalled by APP Pharmaceuticals Inc. after foreign material and non-sterility were discovered in one lot of irinotecan injection, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced.

More Information

Guidelines Provided for Deep Vein Thrombosis Management

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Blood thinners should not be the only therapy considered for patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), according to a scientific statement published online March 21 in Circulation.

Full Text

Citalopram, Finasteride Potentially Mislabeled

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lots of citalopram, an antidepressant, and finasteride, used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia, are being recalled by Greenstone LLC due to possible mislabeling of the bottles, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced.

More Information

Drug Approved for Late-Stage Melanoma

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- The drug Yervoy (ipilimumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat late-stage melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

melanoma

Hormone Therapy Improves Prostate Cancer Survival

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In men with locally advanced prostate cancer, six months of hormone therapy combined with radiation significantly reduces prostate-cancer-specific and all-cause mortality compared with radiotherapy alone, according to a study published online March 25 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Use of Strategies to Reduce Risk of Opioid Misuse Is Low

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- The use of opioid risk-reduction strategies by primary care physicians is limited, even among patients at particular risk of misuse, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Libido Unaffected by Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Sexual desire in patients with breast cancer is not affected by adjuvant endocrine therapy, but is significantly reduced in those women with chemotherapy- or gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist-induced menopause, according to a study published online March 2 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Imatinib Improves Survival in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in complete cytogenetic remission (CCyR) for two years after starting imatinib have similar survival to that of the general population, according to a study published online March 21 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

U.S. Shingles Vaccine Approval Expanded

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- The Zostavax shingles vaccine is now approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for people aged 50 and older.

shingles

Thromboembolism May Recur With Residual Vein Obstruction

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with provoked or unprovoked deep vein thrombosis (DVT), residual vein obstruction (RVO) is associated with a slight increase in the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) but does not seem to predict recurrent VTE in patients with unprovoked DVT following discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy, according to a meta-analysis published online March 7 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Early Tranexamic Acid Reduces Bleeding-Related Death

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Early administration of tranexamic acid reduces mortality due to bleeding in trauma patients; given more than three hours after injury, however, the agent could raise the risk of death, according to research published online March 24 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Acne Impacts Adolescents' Quality of Life

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who suffer from acne are more likely to have a lower quality of life and psychological disorders, including anxiety, depression, and suicide ideation, according to research published in the January issue of the Dermatology Online Journal.

Full Text

Drug Reduces Rate of Conversion to Type 2 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Pioglitazone effectively reduces conversion to type 2 diabetes in people with impaired glucose tolerance, though it may also lead to weight gain and edema, according to research published in the March 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Tiotropium Shows Edge Over Salmeterol for COPD

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Tiotropium, an anticholinergic drug, appears to be more effective than salmeterol in preventing exacerbations in patients with moderate or worse chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research published in the March 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Rheumatic Disease Patients Require Two Flu Vaccine Doses

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases require two doses of flu vaccine to achieve the same antibody response as one dose elicits in controls, which may be due in part to the influence of specific disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), according to a study published online March 7 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hydrocortisone Lowers Risk of Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Intravenous hydrocortisone decreases the risk of developing hospital-acquired pneumonia in intubated trauma patients, according to a study published in the March 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Fibrate Use Rises in U.S. but Remains Stable in Canada

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Fibrate use has increased steadily in the United States but remains stable in Canada, according to a study published in the March 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Dalteparin Not Superior to Unfractionated Heparin

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Dalteparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin, does not appear any more effective in lowering the incidence of proximal deep-vein thrombosis than unfractionated heparin, according to research published online March 22 in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Long-Term Tamoxifen Lowers Breast CA Recurrence Risk

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Women with breast cancer who take tamoxifen for five years appear to have a lower risk of recurrence or contralateral breast cancer 15 years after starting treatment as compared to women who take the drug for two years, and they may also have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and death from a cardiovascular event, according to a study published online March 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Seven-Day On-Off Capecitabine Cycle Treats Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) with capecitabine administered for seven days followed by seven days of rest in combination with bevacizumab has modest efficacy and minimal toxicity, as predicted previously by mathematical modeling, according to a study published online March 8 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Atomoxetine of Limited Value in Young Children With ADHD

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- For 5- and 6-year-old children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), atomoxetine is generally well tolerated and reduces core ADHD symptoms, but it fails to translate to overall clinical and functional improvement, according to a study published online March 21 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Combination Therapy Given to Elderly Without Indications

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Combination therapy of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers is often prescribed without established indications, and is associated with an elevated risk of adverse renal outcomes compared to monotherapy, according to a study published online March 21 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Antibiotics Reduce Risk of ICU-Acquired Infection

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Critically ill patients given prophylactic antibiotics may be significantly less likely to be infected by intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired, highly resistant microorganisms, according to research published online March 21 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Oral Vaccine May Prevent Half of Cholera Episodes

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- The currently available oral cholera vaccine may prevent 50 to 60 percent of cholera episodes in the first two years after vaccination, but its effectiveness is unlikely to last beyond three years, according to a review published in the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Suppressive Therapy Manages Clopidogrel Hypersensitivity

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Clopidogrel hypersensitivity, which affects up to 6 percent of patients, may be successfully managed using corticosteroids and antihistamines, without interrupting drug therapy, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Once-Daily Sildenafil Reduces Raynaud's Attack Frequency

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Modified-release sildenafil reduces frequency of attacks in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) secondary to limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc), and is generally well tolerated, according to a study published in the March issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diabetes Drug Linked to Increased Cardiovascular Risk

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 2 diabetes who take rosiglitazone are at greater risk of congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction (MI), and death, compared to those who take pioglitazone, according to a meta-analysis published online March 17 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Artesunate Provides Superior Treatment for Severe Malaria

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of severe malaria with artesunate is superior to quinine for both adults and children, according to a review published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Inflammatory Marker Tied to Colorectal Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Higher plasma levels of the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (sTNFR-2) appear to be associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) among women, with anti-inflammatory drugs reducing the risk of CRC among women with high baseline sTNFR-2 levels, according to a study published in the March issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Antiepileptic Drugs Tied to Folate and Vitamin B12 Levels

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with many commonly used antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is associated with reduced serum folate or vitamin B12 levels, according to a study published in the February issue of the Annals of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bulking Agent Injections Effective in Fecal Incontinence

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A transanal submucosal injection of dextranomer in stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA Dx) is an effective treatment for fecal incontinence, according to a study published in the March 19 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

5α-Reductase Inhibitors Tied to Adverse Male Sexual Health

THURSDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- 5α-reductase inhibitors (5α-RIs), used to treat symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and hair loss in men, may cause persistent erectile dysfunction, depression, and loss of libido, even after discontinuing the medication, according to a review published in the March issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Professional Values of U.S. and U.K. Doctors Examined

THURSDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- A core of professional values exists among doctors in the United States and the United Kingdom, though significant differences exist in how these values are expressed and prioritized, according to a study published online March 7 in BMJ Quality & Safety.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

17-Hydroxyprogesterone Does Not Lower Neonatal Morbidity

THURSDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Prophylactic treatment with 17-alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17Pc) in twin pregnancy does not reduce neonatal morbidity or prolong gestation, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CABG Ups Quality of Life More Than Drug-Eluting Stents

THURSDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) still has slightly better outcomes than percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in terms of relief from angina and improved quality of life when the latter involves drug-eluting stents rather than bare-metal stents, according to research published in the March 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

High-Dose Cytarabine Not Superior to Intermediate Dose

THURSDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- A high-dose regimen of cytarabine as induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) offers no advantage over more conservative dosing and results in a higher incidence of toxic effects, according to research published in the March 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sirolimus Shows Promise for Treating Lung Disease

WEDNESDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Sirolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, appears to be an effective therapy for stabilizing lung function and improving symptoms and quality of life in patients with lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), according to research published online March 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Adding Omalizumab Improves Asthma Control in Youth

WEDNESDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of omalizumab to a regimen of guidelines-based therapy among youth with persistent asthma appears to improve asthma control and reduce the need for other medications to control the condition, according to a study published in the March 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

High-Dose Clopidogrel Does Not Reduce Mortality Incidence

WEDNESDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- A higher dose of clopidogrel does not reduce the incidence of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), or stent thrombosis in patients with high platelet reactivity after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug eluting stents, according to a study published in the March 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

More Cholera Cases and Deaths Expected in Haiti

WEDNESDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Mathematical modeling estimates that more cases of cholera than expected will occur in the coming months in Haiti, but many could be averted by the provision of clean water, vaccinations, and increased antibiotic distribution, according to a study published online March 16 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Sodium Phenylbutyrate Improves Insulin Resistance

TUESDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA) may improve insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction caused by prolonged elevation of free fatty acids (FFA) in obese or overweight individuals, according to research published in the March issue of Diabetes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Metformin Ranks Highest As Diabetes Treatment

TUESDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Metformin may be the best choice for a first-line agent to treat patients with type 2 diabetes, according to research published online March 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Nonadherence to Medications Common in Lupus Patients

MONDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), intentional and unintentional nonadherence are commonly reported, according to a study published in the March issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Tamoxifen Offers Cost-Effective Breast Cancer Prophylaxis

MONDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Tamoxifen chemoprophylaxis is a cost-effective therapy that successfully reduces breast cancer incidence among women younger than 55 years, even after the drug is discontinued, according to a study published online March 14 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Majority of Drugs Tolerated After Negative Re-Challenge

MONDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who suffer from cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) and have a negative re-challenge under hospital surveillance (RCH) show good tolerance when re-challenged with the same drug, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drug-Related Poisonings Highest in Young Children

MONDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department visits for unintentional drug-related poisonings in the United States are highest among children age 0 to 5 and more prominent in rural areas, and young women have the highest rate of drug-related poisonings with suicidal intent, according to research published online March 3 in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Risk of Infection, Malignancy With Anti-TNF Therapy Unclear

FRIDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with early rheumatoid arthritis taking anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy without prior use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD)/methotrexate do not have an increased risk of serious infections or malignancies, according to a meta-analysis published online Feb. 25 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Hepatitis C-Positive Patients Are Uninsured

FRIDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are more likely to be uninsured, and the rate of insurance coverage is even lower in those who are eligible for treatment, according to a study in the March issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Automated Propofol and Remifentanil Delivery Effective

FRIDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- Automated delivery of propofol and remifentanil using a controller maintains the Bispectral Index (BIS) values better than manual administration during general anesthesia, according to a study published in the March issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Benlysta Approved for Lupus

THURSDAY, March 10 (HealthDay News) -- Benlysta (belimumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat lupus, the first medication sanctioned for the condition in the United States since 1955.

Lupus Foundation of America

Statins May Lower Markers of Immune Activation in HIV

THURSDAY, March 10 (HealthDay News) -- Atorvastatin use decreases cellular markers of immune activation and inflammation in patients infected with HIV type 1 (HIV-1), though it does not affect plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Depression Care in Hospital May Improve Cardiac Outcomes

THURSDAY, March 10 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with depression and cardiac illness, managing depression during hospitalization improves mental health outcomes and may also improve medical outcomes after intervention, according to a study published online March 8 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Insulin Degludec Effective Alternative to Insulin Glargine

THURSDAY, March 10 (HealthDay News) -- Insulin degludec appears to provide comparable glycemic control to insulin glargine, without increased adverse events, and may reduce dosing frequency from once per day to three times weekly, according to a study published online March 10 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Irbesartan Does Not Prevent Cardiovascular Events in A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- The angiotensin-receptor blocker irbesartan fails to lower the rate of cardiovascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation, according to research published in the March 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drug Delays Microalbuminuria in Type 2 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Olmesartan, an angiotensin-receptor blocker, delays the onset of microalbuminuria in people with type 2 diabetes, but it also appears to be associated with an increased risk of fatal cardiovascular events, according to research published in the March 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

HealthGrades Finds Rates of Patient Safety Events Vary

WEDNESDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients treated at hospitals rated with a HealthGrades Patient Safety Excellence Award have, on average, a 46 percent lower risk of experiencing a patient safety incident compared to those treated at the lowest-ranked hospitals, according to the eighth annual HealthGrades Patient Safety in American Hospitals Study published online March 9.

Full Text

Cyclophosphamide Treatment Tied to Urinary Tract Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with systemic necrotizing vasculitides (SNV) treated with cyclophosphamide (CYC) have a five-fold higher risk of developing urinary tract cancer (UTC), according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pharmacological Meta-Analyses Rarely Report Disclosures

TUESDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Meta-analyses of pharmacological treatments rarely include information addressing primary study funding and conflicts of interest (COIs) of the authors for the included randomized control trials (RCTs), according to a study published in the March 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA: Adverse Events Tied to Kaletra in Preterm Infants

TUESDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care providers of a revision to the label of lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) oral solution to include a new warning, as administration of the oral solution may result in serious health problems among premature babies.

More Information

Zalutumumab Beneficial in Head-and-Neck Cancer

MONDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Zalutumumab, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor, appears to significantly prolong progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy, according to a study published online March 7 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Increases

MONDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use increased significantly between 2002 and 2007, and is more likely when access to conventional care is restricted in some way, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Remission Tied to Earlier Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment

MONDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), earlier treatment is associated with an increased likelihood of achieving remission, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Inhaled Epinephrine Gives Temporary Relief From Croup

MONDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Inhaled epinephrine improves moderate to severe croup symptoms in children from 30 minutes to two hours after treatment, according to a literature review published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA: Topiramate (Topamax) Tied to Risk of Oral Clefts

FRIDAY, March 4 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care providers and consumers that new data indicate that women who take topiramate (Topamax) during pregnancy increase the risk for cleft lip and cleft palate in their offspring.

More Information

Psoriatic Arthritis Responds to Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor-α

FRIDAY, March 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) undergoing first treatment series with a tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor have high drug adherence and a good response, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drugs Reach the Foci in Non-Sclerotic Tuberculosis

FRIDAY, March 4 (HealthDay News) -- Effective bactericidal concentrations (EBCs) of three antitubercular drugs are found in osseous tissues around spinal tuberculosis foci, except for an area of osseous tissues 4 mm surrounding the sclerotic wall, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Eribulin Improves Survival in Metastatic Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, March 3 (HealthDay News) -- Among women with heavily pretreated metastatic breast cancer, eribulin mesilate may significantly improve survival compared to currently available treatments, according to a study published online March 3 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Ibuprofen Use Tied to Lower Risk of Parkinson's Disease

THURSDAY, March 3 (HealthDay News) -- Use of ibuprofen may be associated with a reduced risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD), according to a study published online March 2 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Injectable Risperidone No Better Than Oral Antipsychotics

THURSDAY, March 3 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with oral antipsychotics, long-acting injectable risperidone does not appear to improve outcomes in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, and it is associated with more injection site and extrapyramidal adverse effects, according to the results of a long-term trial published in the March 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cannabis Use in Youth Ups Incident Psychosis Risk

THURSDAY, March 3 (HealthDay News) -- Cannabis use among youth is associated with an increased risk of later incident psychotic symptoms, with continued cannabis use increasing the risk for persistent psychotic symptoms, according to a study published online March 1 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Diuretic Has Similar Effect Regardless of Method or Dose

THURSDAY, March 3 (HealthDay News) -- The responses of patients with acute decompensated heart failure to loop diuretics don't appear to differ between groups administered the agent by bolus or continuous infusion, or at a high or low dose, according to research published in the March 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Intensive Glucose Therapy May Not Be Best in Type 2 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Therapy designed to intensively lower glucose in people with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors appears to lower the risk of nonfatal heart attack but is associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality, according to research published in the March 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Maternal Opioid Use Tied to Higher Birth Defect Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal use of opioid analgesics just prior to or during early pregnancy is associated with a modestly higher risk of certain birth defects, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA: Proton Pump Inhibitors Tied to Hypomagnesemia

WEDNESDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care providers and consumers that taking prescription proton pump inhibitor (PPI) drugs for prolonged periods of time, particularly for longer than one year, may be associated with low serum magnesium levels (hypomagnesemia).

More Information

FDA Cracking Down on Unapproved Prescription Drugs

WEDNESDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration intends to remove select unapproved prescription cough, cold, and allergy medications from the U.S. market, the agency has announced.

More Information

Increased Dietary Potassium Tied to Lower Stroke Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Higher dietary potassium intake is correlated with reduced rates of stroke and may also lower the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and total cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a meta-analysis published in the March 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Risk of Adverse Effects Lessens Drug Acceptance in Elderly

WEDNESDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- The willingness to take medication for primary cardiovascular disease prevention in older persons is highly sensitive to its adverse effects and relatively insensitive to its benefits, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Inhaled Nitric Oxide Does Not Shorten Sickle Cell Crisis

WEDNESDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the use of inhaled nitric oxide does not reduce the time to resolution of a vaso-occlusive pain crisis (VOC) compared to placebo, according to a study published in the March 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Antihypertensives Beneficial in Absence of Hypertension

TUESDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with a clinical history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but without hypertension, may benefit from antihypertensive treatment to reduce CVD morbidity and mortality, according to a literature review published in the March 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Roflumilast Approved for Form of COPD

TUESDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Roflumilast has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat flares of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) involving chronic bronchitis.

COPD

U.S. Breast Cancer Incidence Rates Stabilized After 2003

TUESDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer incidence rates among non-Hispanic (NH) white women in the United States stabilized between 2003 and 2007 after a sharp decline between 2002 and 2003 that followed a drop in the use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Oral Steroid Therapy Improves Chronic Rhinosinusitis Symptoms

TUESDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and nasal polyposis with oral steroids followed by topical steroids is more effective than topical steroids alone, according to a study in the March 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Opioid Treatment Associated With Cognitive Dysfunction

TUESDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- One-third of opioid-treated patients with cancer have possible or definite cognitive dysfunction, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Patients Do Not Consolidate Drugs Efficiently

TUESDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients, especially those with low literacy, do not consolidate prescription regimens efficiently, according to a study published in the Feb. 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician's Briefing