Sexual Problems Cut Across National Boundaries

Study finds patterns are the same in different countries

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MONDAY, May 10, 2004 (HealthDayNews) -- Here's more proof that it isn't just you -- researchers have found that patterns of sexual problems cut across social, economic and even national boundaries.

The study, released May 8 at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, surveyed 27,500 men and women in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Mexico, New Zealand, South Africa and the United States.

The researchers found the major sexual problems in men and women were the same in all countries.

Men suffered primarily from early ejaculation and erectile difficulties. Women suffered from lack of interest in sex, lubrication difficulties and an inability to reach orgasm.

"These results indicate that nature may have a much greater impact on sexual health than nurture," researcher Dr. Gerald Brock said in a prepared statement. "In addition to the geographic similarities revealed in this study, the results further delineate the physiologial differences between men and women and the factors that influence their sexual health."

The study also supported some long-held hypotheses, including that many men's sexual problems are related to physical health and aging, while women's problems are associated with psychological and emotional factors.

More information

The American Society for Reproductive Medicine has more about sexual dysfunction.

SOURCES: American Urological Association, news release, May 8, 2004

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