See What HealthDay Can Do For You
Contact Us

August 2007 Briefing - Psychiatry

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for August 2007. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Stressed Out Moms More Likely to Hold Babies on the Right

FRIDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who are stressed show an increased tendency to cradle their infants on their right side, according to a report published online Aug. 22 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Living in Damp, Moldy Home Linked to Depression

THURSDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Living in a damp or moldy home is associated with a higher risk of depression, according to a recent study reported online Aug. 29 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hypnosis Cuts Pain, Anesthetic Use in Breast Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A 15-minute hypnosis session prior to breast surgery reduced the amount of anesthesia required during the operation, the level of post-surgical pain and nausea, and the cost of the procedure, according to the results of a randomized controlled trial published online Aug. 28 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Latinos Vary in Usage of Mental Health Services

TUESDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Among Latino Americans with serious mental disorders, preferred language -- a proxy measure of acculturation -- may be more important than ethnicity in determining mental health service usage, according to study findings published in the August issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text

Depression and Job Stress Linked to Onset of Menopause

TUESDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Job stress is associated with the age at which women reach menopause, and women who are depressed appear to be influenced by different types of job stress than women who are not depressed, according to the results of a prospective population study published Aug. 15 in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Atypical Antipsychotics May Cross Placenta in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Atypical antipsychotic drugs can be detected in umbilical cord blood and may be associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, researchers report in the August issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

TV Reality Shows Boost Interest in Plastic Surgery

FRIDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- People who regularly watch television reality shows featuring plastic surgery feel more knowledgeable about the subject and may be more likely to pursue a consultation for a cosmetic procedure, according to a study published in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Antidepressants Linked to Preterm Birth Risk

FRIDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women treated with antidepressants are more likely to have a preterm infant or one with a lower gestational age than women who are depressed but are not given medication, according to a report in the August issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Poor Self-Reported Vision Tied to Depression in Glaucoma

FRIDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients recently diagnosed with glaucoma are more likely to be depressed if they have worse self-reported visual function, but measures of visual field and visual acuity are not associated with depression, researchers report in the August issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Researchers Spur 'Out-of-Body' Sensation in Healthy Subjects

THURSDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- European researchers have induced healthy people to have an "out-of-body" experience by visually tricking them into believing that their body is somewhere else, according to two reports published in the Aug. 24 issue of Science.

Abstract - Ehrsson
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Blanke
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Risperdal Approved to Treat Teens with Schizophrenia

THURSDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Risperdal (risperidone) to treat children and adolescents with two major psychiatric conditions. A short-term course can now be prescribed to treat manic or mixed episodes of bipolar I disorder in children and adolescents aged 10 to 17, and can also be used to treat adolescents aged 13 to 17 with schizophrenia.

More Information

Resident Duty-Hour Cuts Curb Surgeon Job Satisfaction

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Reforms limiting resident duty hours are increasing surgeons' workloads and may be negatively affecting patient care, researchers report in the August issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Norepinephrine Can Boost Campylobacter Virulence

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- When Campylobacter jejuni is grown in iron-limited media in the presence of norepinephrine, virulence-associated properties are increased compared to cultures grown in the absence of norepinephrine, according to a report in the August issue of Gut. The findings suggest that stress may affect the pathogenicity of the bacteria in food animals or humans, according to an editorial.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Opioid Dependence May Affect Outcomes in Spine Patients

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic disabling occupational spinal disorders and opioid dependence disorder are less likely to return to, and retain, work following interdisciplinary rehabilitation than are their counterparts without this comorbid psychiatric condition, researchers report in the Aug. 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Two Gene Variations Predict Citalopram Response

MONDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A newly identified marker -- a variation in the GRIK4 gene -- may help identify depressed patients who are more likely to respond to citalopram, researchers report in the August issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Anorexia Outcomes May Be Better Than Thought

FRIDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Among young Finnish women, anorexia nervosa is a common but usually transient condition. About two-thirds of patients experience a full recovery within five years of symptom onset, according to a report published in the August issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Brain Injury Can Cause Auditory Hallucinations

FRIDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Auditory hallucinations can result from trauma to the brain, not just from psychotic disorders, according to the authors of a case report published in the Aug. 11 issue of The Lancet.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

ADHD Children at Risk for Delinquency, Substance Abuse

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely to have delinquency and substance use problems later on than other children their age, researchers report in the August issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Familial Aggregation Seen in Bipolar Disorder

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of children with narrow phenotype bipolar disorder are significantly more likely to have bipolar disorder than are parents of children with severe mood dysregulation, according to study findings published in the August issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Early-Childhood Program Benefits Minority Children

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Low-income minority children who participate in a comprehensive, school-based early-childhood intervention may be more likely to stay in school and less likely to become criminals, according to a study published in the August issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial
Editorial

Anxiety Raises Irritable Bowel Syndrome Risk After Illness

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with high stress and anxiety levels who don't rest during a bout of acute gastroenteritis seem to be more likely to develop irritable bowel syndrome than those who have less stress, according to a prospective study in the August issue of the journal Gut.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Gene Variant Linked to Brain Changes in Attention-Deficit

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a variation in the dopamine receptor D4 gene -- the 7-repeat allele -- is associated with tissue thinning in areas of the brain that control attention, according to a report published in the August issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Common Geriatric Conditions Linked to Disability

TUESDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, geriatric conditions that are not part of the traditional disease model of medicine are significantly associated with disability, according to the results of a study published in the Aug. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Caffeine May Reduce Risk of Cognitive Decline

MONDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Women who drink three or more cups of a caffeinated drink such as coffee or tea per day seem to have a lower risk of cognitive decline after age 65 than women who drink one or fewer cups per day, according to a report published online Aug. 6 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Depressed Dopamine Activity Seen in Adult ADHD

MONDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a blunted response to methylphenidate in the left and right caudate, and they have a lower dopamine release than those without the disorder, researchers report in the August issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text

Schizophrenia Hallucinations Linked to Brain Regions

MONDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with schizophrenia and chronic auditory hallucinations appear to have abnormal activity in brain regions involved in processing emotions and human voices, including the middle and superior temporal gyri and the cingular gyri, according to a report in the August issue of Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Adult Drugs Prescribed for Insomnia in Children

FRIDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Most children under 17 who are treated for insomnia or sleep difficulties are given prescription drugs that are only FDA-approved for adults and whose effects during formative growth years are unknown and should be examined, according to a report published in the Aug. 1 issue of Sleep.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gene Variant Associated With Enhanced Emotional Memory

THURSDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- A somewhat common variant of a neurotransmitter receptor is associated with an enhanced ability to remember images and events with emotional significance, including highly traumatic events, according to a study published online July 29 in Nature Neuroscience.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physicians 'Awaken' Man 6 Years After Severe Brain Injury

THURSDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In a scene reminiscent of Oliver Sacks' book Awakenings, physicians have managed to partially rekindle the mind of a man who had been in a minimally conscious state for six years, according to a report published in the August 2 issue of Nature.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Nature News

Physician's Briefing

HealthDay

HealthDay is the world’s largest syndicator of health news and content, and providers of custom health/medical content.

Consumer Health News

A health news feed, reviewing the latest and most topical health stories.

Professional News

A news feed for Health Care Professionals (HCPs), reviewing latest medical research and approvals.