Dec. 2005 Briefing - Psychiatry

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for December 2005. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

U.S. Survey Finds Elderly Can Be Healthy Well Into Old Age

FRIDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The elderly can experience good health well into old age, according to a survey of Utah residents who tend to have greater longevity than the rest of the American population. The findings, published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, suggest that the factors related to healthy aging are modifiable or amenable to public health efforts.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bipolar Disorder Common in Hospitalized Adolescents

FRIDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Bipolar disorder may be more common in adolescents than previously thought, with nearly one in five teenagers admitted to an inpatient psychiatric hospital affected, researchers report in the December issue of the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

PCB Work Exposure Linked To Neurodegenerative Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women who had occupational exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) between the 1940s and the 1970s may have an excess in mortality due to neurodegenerative diseases, according to a study in the January issue of Epidemiology. The study found no association in men and is limited by the small number of cases, the authors say.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nursing Home More Likely If Patient Has Unmet Needs

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Dementia patients who have unmet needs as assessed by their caregiver are more likely to die or be placed in a nursing home, according to a study in the December issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The finding suggests that unmet needs are a better predictor of health outcome than functional or cognitive impairment, the authors say.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Parental Concern May Indicate Child's Mental Illness

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Parental concern about a child's mental health may be a sign that the child does indeed have a psychiatric disorder, according to a study in the Dec. 17 issue of the British Medical Journal.

Full Text

Depression Declines As Alzheimer Disease Progresses

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is common in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients and may be caused by a decline in functional activity rather than a decline in cognitive ability, according to a study in the December issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. In addition, depression tends to decline as the disease progresses, the authors found.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Divorce Can Cause Lasting Decline in Life Satisfaction

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Although life satisfaction gradually rebounds in the years following a divorce, it doesn't return to baseline levels, contradicting research showing that time eventually heals all wounds, according to a study published in the December issue of Psychological Science.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Coma Outcomes on Soap Operas Too Good to Be True

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Coma patients in soap operas experience significantly rosier outcomes than their real-life counterparts, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

Abstract
Full Text

Female Flight Attendants Report Fair to Poor Health

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Female flight attendants have high levels of psychological distress, with many experiencing sexual harassment from passengers or co-workers, Italian researchers report in the January issue of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sorry, Celebrants: Hangover Cures Don't Work

MONDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that there is no conventional or complementary intervention that will prevent or treat a hangover, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

Abstract
Full Text

Short Drinks May Have More Kick Than Tall Ones

MONDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Because of human perceptual bias, alcoholic beverages mixed in short, wide tumblers may be more potent than those mixed in taller and more slender highball glasses, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

Abstract
Full Text

Chromosome 22 Implicated in Abnormal Behavior in Mice

FRIDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A region of human chromosome 22 previously associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders can cause behavioral abnormalities when it is overexpressed in mice, according to a study published online Dec. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Initial Pattern of Brain Activity Recreated at Memory Recall

THURSDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- People who are asked to recall a specific memory recreate the same pattern of brain activity as when the memory initially occurred, according to a report in the Dec. 23 issue of Science. Indeed, researchers found they were able to predict what object a person was thinking about roughly five seconds before they talked about it.

Abstract
Full Text

Low Estrogen in Brain Linked to Alzheimer Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Lack of estrogen in the brain is associated with Alzheimer disease, which could explain why women are more likely to develop the disease than men, according to a study of postmortem human brain tissue and transgenic mice published online Dec. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Oxygen Deprivation Produces Autism-Like Changes in Rats

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Rats briefly deprived of oxygen shortly after birth develop auditory system deficits similar to those seen in autism and other developmental disorders, according to a study published online Dec. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospital 'Handoffs' Common Source of Medical Errors

TUESDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Poor communication during hospital "handoffs," when patient care transitions from one physician or team of physicians to the next, may be responsible for many of the estimated 44,000 to 98,000 deaths that occur each year in U.S. hospitals due to medical errors, according to a study published in the December issue of Academic Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Etanercept Improves Fatigue, Depression from Psoriasis

MONDAY, Dec. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The TNF-alpha-inhibiting drug etanercept may help relieve fatigue and depression in psoriasis patients, in addition to improving symptoms of the skin condition itself, according to a report in the Dec. 15 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Happiness Can Predict Successful Life Outcomes

MONDAY, Dec. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Personal and professional success can be a consequence of happiness, not just a cause, because happy people are more likely to seek out and undertake new life goals that reinforce positive emotions, according to a study published in the November issue of the Psychological Bulletin.

Full Text

Researchers Predict 81 Million Dementia Cases By 2040

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The number of dementia cases will double every 20 years worldwide and will increase most rapidly in India, China and their south Asian and western Pacific neighbors, according to a study in the Dec. 17 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Brain Chemical Stimulates Cocaine Craving in Animals

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Brain infusions of the neuropeptide hypocretin-1 (Hcrt-1) can cause rats to seek cocaine again after being weaned from the drug, possibly by inducing a stress-like state, according to a study published online Dec. 12 in the early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Depression A Risk For Families If Patient Is In Institution

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Family members and others who care for chronically critically ill (CCI) patients are more likely to suffer adverse psychological and physical effects from caregiving if the patient resides in an institution, according to a report in the December issue of Chest.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Epilepsy Surgery Improves Depression and Anxiety

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Seizure-controlling surgery can reduce anxiety and depression, especially in patients with treatment-refractory epilepsy who are seizure-free after the operation, according to a report in the Dec. 13 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patients Control Pain with Real-Time Functional MRI

TUESDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients can control chronic pain by learning to use real-time functional MRI (rtfMRI), according to a study published Dec. 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text

Testosterone May Improve Quality of Life In Alzheimer's

TUESDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone replacement therapy may improve the quality of life in men with mild Alzheimer disease, but it has little effect on cognition, according to a study posted online Dec. 12 in the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text

FDA Warns Paxil Could Increase Risk of Birth Defects

MONDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned that Paxil (paroxetine) could increase the risk of birth defects, particularly cardiac defects, if taken during the first three months of pregnancy. Paxil should not be taken during pregnancy unless other treatment options are not available, the FDA said in a statement.

More Information
More Information
More Information

Sleep Quality, Social Factors Predict IL-6 in Women

MONDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Older women who have good sleep quality and social relationships have lower levels of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6, according to study findings published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

Abstract
Full Text

Mother's Attitude Affects Adolescent Weight Perception

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who place importance on weight status are likely to have children who are preoccupied with being thinner and dieting to get there, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Chronic Stress Hastens Induced Skin Cancer in Mice

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic stress accelerates the emergence and development of squamous cell carcinomas in mice, according to a study published in the Dec. 7 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Phone-Based Care Helps Treat Panic, Anxiety Disorders

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The use of phone-based collaborative intervention by non-mental health professionals in the primary care setting is more effective in treating panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder than usual physician care, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Uncomplicated Depression Linked to Low Suicide Risk

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with uncomplicated depression are at low suicide risk, according to a study published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine. However, a second study in the same issue suggests that training of clinicians can double the rate of detection of suicidal tendencies.

Abstract
Full Text
Abstract
Full Text

Childhood Headache Often Persists into Adulthood

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who experience headaches in early childhood are likely to continue having them much later in life, researchers report in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription of payment may be required)

Risks from Frequent Childhood Moves Linked to Home Life

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The health risks previously associated with frequent mobility in childhood may be due to the increased number of adverse experiences these children endure, according to a report in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Psychosocial Disability Fluctuates in Bipolar Disease

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with bipolar disorder (BP) experience psychosocial disability that fluctuates over time and with changes in symptom severity, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry. This disability can be just as prominent in the depressive phase as in the manic phase of the disease, the authors note.

Abstract
Full Text

Moderate Alcohol Intake Linked to Lower Obesity Risk

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate consumption of alcohol may be associated with reduced risk of obesity, according to a study published online on Dec. 4 in the open access journal BMC Public Health.

Full Text

Wounds Heal More Slowly in the Unhappily Married

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- A hostile marriage can slow wound healing and increase blood levels of proinflammatory cytokines, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Enlargement of Cerebral Matter in Children with Autism

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- There is a generalized enlargement of gray and white matter cerebral volumes in young children with autism, although cerebellar volume remains normal, according to a study in the December issue of Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fibromyalgia Patients May Benefit from Insomnia Therapy

MONDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Insomnia is a common problem in fibromyalgia patients and a new study suggests that a course of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) may improve insomnia and other symptoms, according to a report published in the Nov. 28 Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Psychotherapy Arms Youths Against PTSD

MONDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Targeted psychotherapy reduced post-traumatic stress in adolescent disaster survivors, according to a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Depression Affects Drug Adherence for Comorbidities

FRIDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies suggest that depression plays an important role in whether or not patients adhere to medication regimens for other conditions. In one study, taking depression medication was associated with adherence to diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) medication, while in the other non-adherence to medication for coronary heart disease (CHD) was associated with major depression. Both studies were published in the Nov. 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Creativity Associated with More Sexual Partners

THURSDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Creative people tend to have more sexual partners than those who are less artistic, and also have personality traits that are predictive of schizophrenia, according to a study published online Nov. 29 in The Proceedings of the Royal Society (B).

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician's Briefing