See What HealthDay Can Do For You
Contact Us

February 2009 Briefing - Psychiatry

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for February 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Sexual Lyrics Associated with Early Sexual Experience

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Degrading sexual lyrics, which account for two-thirds of all sexual references in popular music, are associated with early sexual experiences in adolescents, according to study findings released online Feb. 24 in advance of publication in the March issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Full Text

Jobs Linked with Poor Behavior in Fifth Graders

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Fifth graders who work are more likely to engage in various forms of substance use or delinquencies compared with their non-working peers, according to study findings released online Feb. 24 in advance of publication in the April issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Full Text

More Rapid Communication of Breast Biopsy Results Needed

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Uncertainty while awaiting a final diagnosis following a large-core breast biopsy is associated with an abnormal salivary cortisol profile, indicative of biochemical distress, according to research published in the March issue of Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diabetes May Increase Risk for Perinatal Depression

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Women who develop diabetes either prior to or during pregnancy are more likely to experience perinatal depression, including postpartum depression, researchers report in the Feb. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Insurance Essential for Good Health, Well-Being

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Having health insurance is vital for health and well-being, and when rates of uninsurance are high, even insured people are more likely to struggle to obtain necessary care, according to a new report from the Institute of Medicine released online Feb. 24.

More Information

US Health Spending May Have Hit $2.4 Trillion in 2008

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Health spending in the United States was estimated to be $2.4 trillion last year, and is expected to account for an unprecedented share of the economy this year, according to a report published online Feb. 24 in Health Affairs.

Abstract
Full Text

Workers' Comp Linked to Poor Back Surgery Outcomes

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Workers' compensation patients who undergo lumbar discectomy may have a greater risk of poor outcomes than non-compensated patients, according to study findings published in the March issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Postnatal Glucocorticoids Affect Adaptation to Stress

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal glucocorticoid excess due to deletion of pituitary glucocorticoid receptors affects the ability of adult mice to cope with stress, according to research published online Feb. 12 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Issues Exemption for Device That Treats OCD

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a human device exemption for a system that uses electrical therapy in the brain to suppress severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms, according to a release issued by the agency Feb. 19.

More Information

Early Recognition of Depression May Benefit Cancer Survivors

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- People diagnosed with cancer may face an increased risk of depression that persists for years, according to research published online Feb. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Proposed Changes to Health Care Would Reduce Costs

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Simultaneous gains in universal health coverage, improved health outcomes and slowed spending growth would have a major impact on the development of public policy, according to a perspective published in the Feb. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

Transparency, Globalization Growing in Clinical Research

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- All clinical trial data and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration database should be publicly available, and global clinical research should be conducted in relevant populations for potential applications of the intervention, according to two articles published in the Feb. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Wood
Full Text
Abstract - Glickman
Full Text

Implementing a Quality Improvement Faculty Path

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A new career pathway in academic medicine, termed clinicians in quality improvement, is a justified concept to achieve and recognize excellence in patient safety, according to a commentary published in the Feb. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ads Featuring 'Drug Facts Box' Help Educate Consumers

TUESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Replacing the brief summary in direct-to-consumer ads with a "drug facts box" may result in improved consumer knowledge and judgment about medication benefits and side effects, according to study findings released online Feb. 17 in advance of publication in the Apr. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Sleep Problems, Headaches May Influence Each Other

MONDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The use of sleep as a method of headache relief may help promote insomnia in women with tension-type headaches, according to research published in the Feb. 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Early Gesture Behaviors Influence Child's Vocabulary

MONDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Parents with higher socioeconomic status are more likely to employ gesture when communicating with infants, which may help explain why children from more affluent homes have a more extensive vocabulary when they start school, according to a report published in the Feb. 13 edition of Science.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drug May Help Erase Scary Memories

MONDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol can erase scary memories by blocking memory reconsolidation, a process where fear memories change when recalled, according to research published online Feb. 15 in Nature Neuroscience.

Abstract
Full Text

Secondhand Smoke Linked to Cognitive Impairment

FRIDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Secondhand smoke exposure may be associated with an increased risk of developing cognitive impairment, according to research published online Feb. 12 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Psychiatric Problems Common in Teen Transplant Recipients

FRIDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent renal transplant recipients are more likely to have learning disabilities, social competence problems and psychiatric problems than healthy adolescents, according to the results of a study published online Oct. 7 in advance of publication in Pediatric Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Financial Incentives May Improve Smoking Cessation

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Offering workers financial incentives to stop smoking was associated with higher long-term smoking cessation rates, according to research published in the Feb. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Care Coordination Programs Don't Benefit Medicare Patients

TUESDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- For Medicare beneficiaries with chronic illnesses, most care coordination programs have little impact on reducing hospitalizations and costs or improving quality of care, according to a report published in the Feb. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Mediterranean Diet Benefits Cognitive Function in Elderly

MONDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In cognitively normal older adults, adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with a modestly reduced risk of developing mild cognitive impairment, and in older adults who already have mild cognitive impairment, adherence to the diet is associated with a significantly reduced risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to a report published in the February issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Methylphenidate Linked to Brain Neuronal Changes in Mice

FRIDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The use of methylphenidate in mice was associated with neuronal changes in the brain with similarities and differences compared to the effects of cocaine, according to research published online Feb. 6 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mutations Found in Nonsyndromic Mental Retardation

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in the SYNGAP1 gene, encoding a ras GTPase-activating protein, occur in patients with nonsyndromic mental retardation but not other conditions of mental retardation, according to research published in the Feb. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Early Childhood Stress Linked to Weakened Immune System

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A stressful early childhood impairs the long-term function of the immune system, according to research published online Feb. 2 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

Abstract
Full Text

Eye Region Gives Hints for Age, Level of Fatigue

TUESDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals use the eye region to make age and fatigue judgments about another person, suggesting that eyes are disproportionately important for providing facial cues, according to research published in the February issue of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text

Education Does Not Impact Rate of Cognitive Decline

TUESDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Although there is a clear association between the level of education attained and cognitive function, there is no parallel link to cognitive decline, according to study findings published in the Feb. 3 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pregnancy Hormone Level May Predict Postpartum Depression

MONDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Placental corticotropin-releasing hormone levels during mid-pregnancy can be used to predict the risk of postpartum depression, according to the results of a study published in the February issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Adolescent TV Time Affects Adult Risk of Depression

MONDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who watch a lot of TV are at increased risk of depression as adults, while the risk of adolescents using cannabis increases the more they spend time going out with their friends, according to two studies published in the February issues of the Archives of General Psychiatry and the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, respectively.

Abstract - Primack
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Kuntsche
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

High Television Viewing Predicts Poor Dietary Habits

MONDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Increased television viewing in middle and high school students predicts poor dietary habits in subsequent years, possibly due to increased advertising exposure, according to research published online Jan. 30 in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Abstract
Full Text

Physician's Briefing
undefined
undefinedundefined