Health Tip: Heat and the Elderly

How to stay safe when temperatures rise

Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.

(HealthDay News) -- People 65 and older are more likely than younger people to have heat-related illness. Older people often have trouble regulating body temperature due to a chronic medical condition or use of certain prescription drugs.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests:

  • Stay in an air-conditioned place as much as possible. If your home doesn't have air conditioning, locate an air-conditioned shelter in your area.
  • Do not rely on a fan to cool you when it's really hot outside.
  • Drink more water than usual, and don't wait until you're thirsty to drink.
  • If your doctor limits the amount of fluids you drink, ask the doctor how much you should drink during hot weather.
  • Don't use the stove or oven to cook. It will make your home hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths.
  • Do not perform very strenuous activities, and get plenty of rest.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.

--

Last Updated: