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Health Tip: Recognizing Heat Exhaustion

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(HealthDay News) -- During very hot weather, the body's ability to cool itself down is compromised, says the U.S. National Weather Service.

As the body dehydrates, losing important fluids and salts, you or someone you know may develop heat exhaustion.

Signs of heat exhaustion include:

  • Heavy sweating and weakness.
  • Cool, pale and clammy skin.
  • Fast, weak pulse.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
  • Dizziness and fainting.

If a person shows symptoms of heat exhaustion, get the person to a cool place and seek immediate medical attention.

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