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CHEST: Umbrella Valve Has Potential in COPD

Trial shows investigational non-invasive valve safe and effective

TUESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- An investigational umbrella-shaped valve showed promise as a non-invasive alternative to lung volume reduction surgery in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research presented at CHEST 2006, the 72nd annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians in Salt Lake City.

Daniel H. Sterman, M.D., of the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center in Philadelphia, and colleagues presented safety and efficacy data from a multicenter pilot study of the IBV Valve in patients with severe upper-lobe emphysema. During 27 months, 520 valves were implanted in 75 patients, with a mean of six to seven per patient.

Forty-six patients had fewer complications and retained more pulmonary capacity than those who did not respond to treatment. In responding patients, the valves transferred a mean of 20 percent ventilation and perfusion to healthier lung areas. Two-thirds who responded also had significant improvement in oxygen use and carbon dioxide diffusing capacity. Responders were usually younger than 75 years, had fewer treated lung segments and no lingular treatment. At 90 days, there was one bronchospasm and one COPD flare in responders, and two bronchospasm and one death with pneumothorax in non-responders.

"Valve treatment may represent a valuable option for the palliative treatment of patients with emphysema," said Mark J. Rosen, M.D., president of the American College of Chest Physicians.

The study was sponsored by the developer of the IBV Valve, Spiration, Inc.

Abstract

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