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December 2007 Briefing - Pulmonology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pulmonology for December 2007. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Mouse Study Points to Shorter Tuberculosis Drug Treatment

THURSDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A daily or three times weekly regimen including rifapentine and moxifloxacin might cut the treatment time for tuberculosis from the current six-month duration to three months or less, according to the results of a mouse study published online Dec. 18 in PLoS Medicine.

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Sleep Apnea Patients Clustered by Intention to Exercise

THURSDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- An analysis of intention to exercise in obstructive sleep apnea patients has identified four patient types based on their attitude and inclination to exercise, researchers report in the Dec. 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

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Smoke Exposure in Infancy May Cause Atopic Sensitization

THURSDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Children exposed to secondhand cigarette smoke in early infancy may be at increased risk of developing atopic sensitization to common inhalant and food allergens, according to an article published online Dec. 18 in Thorax.

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Pulmonary Embolism Imaging Techniques Compared

TUESDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is not inferior to ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scanning in ruling out pulmonary embolism, according to an article in the Dec. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Higher Rates of Lung Cancer in Lower UVB Light Areas

TUESDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In a survey of 111 countries, places with lower levels of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiance have higher incidence of lung cancer, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Healthy Preterm Infants Have Altered Lung Development

MONDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy premature infants exhibit decreased airway function throughout the first two years of life even though their lung volumes are normal, suggesting that premature birth may be associated with altered lung development, researchers report in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine.

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Traffic Linked to Worse Lung Measures in Kids with Asthma

MONDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Traffic-related exposures are associated with reduced lung volumes and increased airway inflammation in children with asthma, according to research published in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine.

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Simulation Training Improves Airway Management Skills

THURSDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Among medical residents, scenario-based training with a computerized patient simulator leads to better initial airway management skills than traditional training consisting of two years of clinical experience, according to study findings published in the December issue of the journal Chest.

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High Colon Cancer Risk for Schizophrenic Patients

THURSDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with schizophrenia are at a higher risk of colon cancer but have a lower risk of respiratory cancer compared to the general population, according to the results of a study published in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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FDA: Deaths Related to Radio Frequency Ablation

THURSDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Use of radio frequency (RF) ablation devices in the treatment of lung tumors has resulted in some patient deaths, according to a public health notification released by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration this week.

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Alcohol Abuse Leads to Airway Disease After Transplant

THURSDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Lung transplants from alcohol-fed rats cause obliterative bronchiolitis unless the transplant is a perfect match, according to study findings published in the Dec. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Traffic Linked to Reduced Lung Function in Asthmatics

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to vehicle traffic can result in a significant reduction in lung function in adults with asthma, and reducing exposure to airborne particulates may slow lung-function decline in adults, according to two studies published in the Dec. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Editorial

Dextromethorphan Loses to Honey As Cough Remedy

MONDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of children with upper respiratory tract infections rate buckwheat honey as the most effective treatment for nighttime coughing compared to honey-flavored dextromethorphan (DM) or placebo, according to a report in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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New Classification System Categorizes Infant Lung Disease

MONDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A new classification system for disorders presenting with diffuse lung disease in infants provides new information on disease frequency, clinical settings and outcome, researchers report in the Dec. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Snoring and Apnea Affect Teens' Academic Performance

MONDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers who snore or have sleep apnea perform more poorly in school, as do teens who do not get enough sleep in general, researchers report in the December issue of the journal Sleep.

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