Factors Affect Quality of Dual-Source Computed Tomography

Heart rate variability and calcification, but not heart rate, have significant effects

WEDNESDAY, April 30 (HealthDay News) -- Heart rate variability and calcification, but not heart rate, have significant effects on image quality in patients undergoing dual-source computed tomography for known or suspected coronary artery disease, researchers report in the May issue of Radiology.

Harald Brodoefel, M.D., and colleagues from Eberhard-Karls-University in Tubingen, Germany, assessed whether heart rate, heart rate variability and calcification affected dual-source computed tomography image quality in 100 patients known or suspected of having coronary artery disease.

The researchers found that the mean heart rate was 64.9 beats per minute, the mean heart rate variability was 23.6 beats per computed tomography exam, the mean Agatston score was 786.5, and 90.2 percent of segments were of diagnostic image quality. Heart rate variability and calcification had significant effects on image quality, the authors note. Calcification had the most significant effect on diagnostic accuracy and the number of non-diagnostic segments.

"While dual-source computed tomography resulted in heart-rate independent image quality, image quality remained prone to heart rate variability and calcification," Brodoefel and colleagues conclude.

Abstract
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