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April 2015 Briefing - Radiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Radiology for April 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Study Looks at Variability in Measures of Breast Density

THURSDAY, April 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Volpara and Quantra algorithms have the lowest variability in repeated measures of breast density, according to a study published in the May issue of Radiology.

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Worse Working Memory in Women Versus Men Post Mild TBI

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research from Taiwan uncovers more evidence that women may have a more difficult time recovering their memory after concussions. The study appears online April 28 in Radiology.

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Physician Compensation Up for Most Specialties

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physician compensation has gone up for almost all specialties, according to a 2015 report published by Medscape.

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CDC: Surveillance System Can Help Reduce Health Care Injuries

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A surveillance system for health care facilities can be used to identify and help reduce the number of preventable injuries among health care personnel, according to research published in the April 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Motion-Tracking MRI May Help ID Stroke Risk in A-Fib

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Motion-tracking magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the heart can help identify people with atrial fibrillation (AF) who are at high risk for stroke, a new study indicates. The study also calls into question the mechanism linking AF with higher stroke risk, says a team reporting the findings online April 27 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Radial Access Cuts Vascular Complications in Angiography

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women undergoing coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have a higher rate of vascular complications than men, which are significantly reduced with radial access, according to a study published in the April 20 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Post-Chemo Radiation May Not Be Needed in Early Hodgkin's

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with early Hodgkin's lymphoma who have negative findings on positron-emission tomography (PET) after three cycles of chemotherapy, progression-free survival is similar with or without further radiation, according to a study published in the April 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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EHR Data Mining Helps With Quality Improvement

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) are a valuable source of data that can be mined to help practices with quality improvement performance, according to a study published in Medical Economics.

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Under and Over Imaging Suspected in Prostate CA Care

TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For men with nonmetastatic (M0) castration resistant prostate cancer who have a negative bone scan after diagnosis, factors associated with a second bone scan include higher prostate-specific antigen (PSA), shorter PSA doubling time, and faster PSA velocity; however, there may be under imaging in those at high risk and over imaging in those at low risk, according to a study published in the April issue of the The Journal of Urology.

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EHR Decision Support Ups Radiologic Test Appropriateness

TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Computerized clinical decision-support (CCDS) capabilities of electronic health records may improve appropriate use of diagnostic radiologic test ordering and reduce test use, according to a review published in the April 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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USPSTF Revisits Mammography Guidelines

TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women in their 40s should talk with their doctors and then decide for themselves whether they need regular mammograms to screen for breast cancer before age 50, according to draft U.S. federal health guidelines.

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Suboptimal Prescribing Attitudes Could Signal Personal Distress

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students in personal distress may be more likely to have suboptimal attitudes about self-prescribing and personal responsibility for reporting impaired colleagues, according to a study published in the April issue of Academic Medicine.

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Medicare Spending Down in Year One of Pioneer ACO

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare spending is down in year one of the Pioneer accountable care organization (ACO) program, according to a study published online April 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ethical Implications for Looking Up Applicants on Facebook

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Looking up students on Facebook and other social networking sites (SNS) is associated with ethical concerns, according to a perspective piece published in the March issue of the Journal of Graduate Medical Education.

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AMA Announces End of Sustainable Growth Rate Formula

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Recently adopted legislation has repealed the sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Survey Looks at Patient Attitudes Regarding Informed Consent

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most U.S. adults would prefer to be asked for permission to participate in studies assessing usual medical practices, according to a study published online April 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Security Breaches of Health Records Up Over Past Decade

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Breaches in data security exposed more than 29 million health records to potential criminal misuse between 2010 and 2013, according to a new study. Security breaches involving hacking have nearly doubled in recent years, rising to 8.7 percent in 2013 compared with 4.7 percent in 2010, according to the study, published as a research letter in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Placebo Response May Depend on Individual DNA

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The strength of the placebo effect may depend on particular DNA, according to a report published online April 13 in Trends in Molecular Medicine.

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Most Hospitalists Would Not Order Inpatient Mammography

MONDAY, April 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most hospitalists feel that they should not be involved in breast cancer screening, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Medical Debt Burden Higher in Texas, Florida

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significantly more adults in Florida and Texas struggle to pay medical bills or pay off medical debt over time compared with residents of New York and California, according to a new Commonwealth Fund report released Friday.

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Many Doctors Haven't Started Dealing With ICD-10 Revision

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians have barely begun to deal with issues relating to documentation associated with the transition to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Art Program Hones Med Students' Visual Observation Skills

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An innovative interdisciplinary program, Art Rounds, is effective for improving medical and nursing students' physical observation skills, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Nursing Education.

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High Costs for False-Positive Mammograms, Overdiagnosis

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mammography screening is associated with considerable costs linked to false-positive mammograms and breast cancer overdiagnosis, with national expenditure estimated at $4 billion annually, according to a study published in the April issue of Health Affairs.

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MRI Could Be Useful Pancreatic Cancer Screen for High-Risk

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to screen people at high genetic risk for pancreatic cancer might help spot tumors early, according to new research. The findings were published online April 8 in JAMA Surgery.

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Limited Time Available to Review Sunshine Act Data

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have only 45 days to review and dispute reports regarding their financial ties to drug and medical device manufacturers reported under the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Med Students, Residents Rarely Perform Stethoscope Hygiene

TUESDAY, April 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stethoscope hygiene is rarely performed by trainee physicians, according to a research letter published online April 2 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Article Highlights Legal Issues Linked to Physician Extenders

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The use of physician extenders (PEs; mainly physician assistants and nurse practitioners) may bring added legal risks to a practice, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Sonographic Follow-Up May Be Adequate for Teen Breast Masses

THURSDAY, April 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sonographically benign-appearing solid breast masses in adolescents may undergo sonographic follow-up based on combined criteria of size and volume change per month, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine.

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Ob-Gyns Say Use Ultrasound First for Pelvic Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound should be the first type of imaging used to assess pelvic symptoms in women, a team of obstetricians and gynecologists write in an article published in the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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