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December 2014 Briefing - Radiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Radiology for December 2014. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Radiation Exposure to Temple of Anesthetists Seems Safe

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Radiation exposure to the temple of anesthetists performing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair or interventional neuroradiology procedures seems to be within safe recommended limits, according to a study published in the January issue of Anaesthesia.

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AMA Identifies Top 10 Issues That Affected Docs in 2014

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The top 10 issues that affected physicians in 2014 include many regulatory issues relating to Medicare and data release, as well as health issues such as overprescribing of antibiotics and the Ebola crisis, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Ebola, ACA, VA Scandal Top U.S. Health News for 2014

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It started as a deadly but little-known outbreak in West Africa, but the lethal and unchecked spread of the Ebola virus dominated U.S. headlines for much of 2014, making it one of the year's top health news features.

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Rebleeds Common Post-Capsule Endoscopy for Obscure GI Bleeds

TUESDAY, Dec. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one-third of patients who undergo capsule endoscopy (CE) for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) have rebleeding a year or more later, according to research published online Dec. 15 in the Journal of Digestive Diseases.

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Risk of Leukemia Tied to Breast Cancer Rx Higher Than Thought

MONDAY, Dec. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Among early-stage breast cancer patients who undergo chemotherapy and/or radiation treatment, the risk for developing treatment-related leukemia, though low, is still double what experts had previously thought, a new analysis reveals. Reporting online Dec. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, the researchers said the findings should give pause to doctors and breast cancer patients who are considering post-surgical treatment options.

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High Yield With Radiologist Recommendation for Chest CT

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Chest computed tomography (CT) examinations recommended by a radiologist to assess abnormal chest radiographic findings have a high yield of clinically relevant findings, according to research published online Dec. 22 in Radiology.

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No Increased Risk of Second Cancers With Radiotx in Pelvic CA

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with pelvic cancers, the risk of developing a second cancer is not increased with radiotherapy (RT), according to a study published online Dec. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Brain Variations on MRI May Predict Surgical Success in OCD

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors may be able to identify candidates for dorsal anterior cingulotomy for refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) by looking at a key structure in the targeted brain region. These research findings have been published online Dec. 23 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Tips Offered to Docs, Spouses for Maintaining Happy Marriage

FRIDAY, Dec. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Simple tips can help physicians and their spouses maintain marital happiness, according to an article published in the American Medical Association (AMA) Alliance magazine Physician Family.

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Invasive Procedures Down With Noninvasive Prenatal Testing

THURSDAY, Dec. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The number of invasive diagnostic procedures, including amniocentesis, is down significantly after the introduction of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT), according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound.

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Digital Self-Scheduling Set to Increase Considerably by 2019

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Digital self-scheduling is set to increase considerably in the next five years, according to a report published by Accenture.

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Physicians Reminded of Ethical Obligations Regarding Torture

TUESDAY, Dec. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- With the issuing of the new U.S. Senate report on interrogations, the American Medical Association (AMA) is reminding physicians of their ethical obligations relating to torture and interrogation.

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Greater Emphysema-Like Lung on CT Linked to Mortality

TUESDAY, Dec. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals without airflow obstruction or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), greater emphysema-like lung on computed tomography (CT) is associated with all-cause mortality, according to a study published in the Dec. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Support for Electronic Health Information Varies With Use

TUESDAY, Dec. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Consent and purpose are important for public support of secondary uses of electronic health information, according to a study published in the Dec. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Physicians Should Scrutinize Job Offers Before Accepting

MONDAY, Dec. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should scrutinize job offers and pay attention to specific issues before accepting a job, according to an article published Dec. 3 in Medical Economics.

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Webcast Scheduled to Discuss Maintenance of Certification

MONDAY, Dec. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New data relating to Maintenance of Certification (MOC) will be discussed in a free webcast to be held Dec. 17 by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

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Transesophageal ECHO Impacts Cardioembolic Stroke Care

MONDAY, Dec. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- As a result of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) for suspected cardioembolic stroke, 16.7 percent of patients experience a significant change in management, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Many Breast Cancer Patients Receive Too Much Radiation Tx

THURSDAY, Dec. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. patients with breast cancer still get radiation therapy for much longer than they need to, according to research published online Dec. 10 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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More Students Enrolling in U.S. Medical Schools

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More students are enrolling in medical schools, and enrollees are more diverse than before, according to a report from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Best for Pancreatic CA

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- High-intensity focused ultrasound seems superior to other therapies for pancreatic cancer, according to a review published in the December issue of the Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine.

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More Docs, Patients Not Speaking Same Language

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People applying to become medical residents in the United States speak a wide range of non-English languages, but many aren't the languages spoken by patients with limited English skills, according to a research letter published in the Dec. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on medical education.

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Work-Hour Restrictions Have Not Improved Outcomes

TUESDAY, Dec. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing medical residents' work hours hasn't improved mortality rates, hospital readmission rates, or outcomes of surgery, according to two new studies published in the Dec. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on medical education.

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Docs Trained in High-Cost Areas Practice More Costly Medicine

TUESDAY, Dec. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors who were trained in high-cost areas of the United States may be more likely to practice expensive medicine, a new study suggests; however, that effect gradually decreases over time. The study was published in the Dec. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on medical education.

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Higher Paid Docs Earn More Money From More Procedures

TUESDAY, Dec. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- High-income doctors make more money by ordering more procedures for each patient rather than by seeing more patients, according to an analysis of 2012 Medicare data published in a research letter Dec. 8 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Routine U/S for Dense Breasts May Not Be Worth Cost

TUESDAY, Dec. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New research questions the value of ultrasound screening for women with dense breasts who've had a normal mammogram. The study was published in the Dec. 9 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Vigorous Back Massage Can Cause Spinal Injury

FRIDAY, Dec. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma can occur after vigorous back massage, according to a case study published in the Dec. 1 issue of Spine.

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CT Scans Post-TIA Yield Clues to Future Stroke Risk

FRIDAY, Dec. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A computed tomography (CT) scan shortly after a transient ischemic attack can help identify patients at risk of suffering another stroke within three months, new research suggests. The study was published online Dec. 4 in Stroke.

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AMA: Social Determinants of Health to Be Taught in Med School

THURSDAY, Dec. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new policy implemented by the American Medical Association (AMA) supports integrating more training on the social determinants of health into undergraduate medical education, according to a report published by the AMA.

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Lower Use of Cancer-Related Imaging in VA Health System

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer-related imaging use is lower in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system than in fee-for-service Medicare, and use is not associated with geographic variation, according to research published in the Dec. 2 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Too Much Patient Care Tied to Faculty Members' Intent to Leave

TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Spending "far too much/too much" time/effort on patient care is associated with increased intent to leave the institution, according to research published in Academic Medicine.

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Progress Detailed in Care of Cancer-Linked Lymphedema

TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Recent developments are affecting the management of cancer-related lymphedema, according to an article published online Nov. 19 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Doctor Discusses Ways to Keep Morale in Medicine High

MONDAY, Dec. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the many frustrations for doctors in medical practice, there are ways to keep morale high, according to an article published Nov. 20 in Medical Economics.

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Many Physicians Report Their Incomes Have Plateaued

MONDAY, Dec. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians report that their personal income has not changed since last year, according to the results of the Physicians Practice 2014 Physicians Compensation Survey.

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Experts Provide Guidance for Renal Masses in Pediatrics

MONDAY, Dec. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Renal tumors are rare in the pediatric population, and uncertainty surrounding pathology complicates management, according to a state-of-the-art review article published online Dec. 1 in Pediatrics.

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Physician's Briefing