March 2015 Briefing - Radiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Radiology for March 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Small, Steady Decline in Cancer Rates in U.S. Over Past Decade

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- America is making slow but steady progress against cancer, with a continuing decline in cancer deaths, according to a new report published online March 30 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The report was coauthored by experts from the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, the American Cancer Society, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

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Recommendations for Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Peds ER

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) physicians should be trained in point-of-care ultrasonography, according to a policy statement published online March 30 in Pediatrics.

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2015 Match Sees High Proportion of Unmatched Seniors

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 6.1 percent of U.S. allopathic medical school seniors in the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) were not placed into first-year residency positions, with a higher percentage of unmatched seniors than in 2014, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Less Aggressive Guidelines Issued for Pancreatic Cysts

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New, less aggressive guidelines have been developed for management of pancreatic cysts. The guidelines were published in the April issue of Gastroenterology.

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U/S Strain Imaging Can Quantify, Map Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasonographic (US) strain imaging can quantify and map behaviors in the carpal tunnel, according to a study published in the April issue of Radiology.

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Physicians Should Be Aware of Signs of Burnout

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Burnout can be prevented if physicians are aware of the warning signs, according to an article published by the American Medical Association.

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Patients Expect More Info About Tests Involving Radiation

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There is a considerable gap between patient expectations and current practices for provision of information relating to radiation use in medical imaging tests, according to a special report published online March 24 in Radiology.

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Majority of ER Doctors Admit Ordering Tests Defensively

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly all emergency department doctors recently surveyed said they order magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scans their patients may not need, mainly because they fear malpractice lawsuits. These findings were published online March 23 in Academic Emergency Medicine.

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Early Imaging Doesn't Improve Back Pain Outcomes in Seniors

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Early imaging is not associated with improved outcomes at one year among older adults with a new primary care visit for back pain, according to a study published in the March 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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More Than 16 Million Americans Have Gained Coverage Under ACA

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Obama Administration reported Monday the largest drop in the number of Americans without health insurance since the Johnson administration expanded health coverage through Medicare and Medicaid 50 years ago.

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Gender-Specific Variation in Medical Specialties

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical specialties vary by gender, with obstetrics/gynecology and pediatrics dominated by female residents and specialties such as surgery, emergency medicine, and anesthesiology dominated by males, according to a report published by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

AAMC 2015 Report on Residents

HHS Wants to Help Restore Joy of Medicine

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is listening to physicians and wants to address the regulatory burdens they face, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Getting Heard May Be Key to Getting New Job

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Your voice may be the key to landing a new job, researchers report in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science.

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Where You Live May Impact Use of Unnecessary Imaging

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with low-risk prostate or breast cancer may have higher or lower odds of getting an unnecessary imaging based on geography, according to a new study published online March 12 in JAMA Oncology.

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FDA Updates Recs for Cleaning of Reusable Med Devices

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued final recommendations for the cleaning and sterilization of medical devices used in invasive procedures. The updated rules, first proposed in 2011, were released in response to last month's reports of seven serious infections and two deaths at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, which were caused by contaminated duodenoscopes.

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Clinical Trial Data Often Not Reported in Timely Manner

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are not promptly reporting the results of clinical trials to ClinicalTrials.gov, according to an article published in the March 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physicians Should Plan Exit Strategy in Advance

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should begin planning their exit strategy three to five years in advance, according to the American Medical Association.

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Persistent EHR Nonadoption Could Mean Lower Payment

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Persistent nonadopters of electronic health records (EHRs) tend to be older, and are employed in smaller practices, according to a letter published in the March 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Exercise Perfusion CT Imaging IDs Coronary Stenosis

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients suspected of having hemodynamically significant coronary stenosis, exercise computed tomography (CT) myocardial perfusion imaging is feasible and accurate, according to a study published in the March issue of Radiology.

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Frustrated by Regulations, Doctors Increasingly Miserable

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The nationwide Physician Misery Index is 3.7 out of 5, with the vast majority of physicians reporting that the business and regulation of health care has worsened the practice of medicine, according to a report published by Geneia.

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More Than Half of Angiograms for IHD Deemed Appropriate

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of coronary angiographic studies done to investigate suspected ischemic heart disease (IHD) would be classified as appropriate according to the 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization (AUC). The findings were published in the March 10 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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AAMC: Significant Shortfall of Physicians Projected for 2025

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The expected shortfall of physicians is projected to reach about 46,000 to 90,000 by 2025, according to a study conducted by IHS Inc. for the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Beats Prone Stereotactic VAB

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) is superior to that of prone stereotactic (PS) VAB, according to a study published in the March issue of Radiology.

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Review: Skin Tests Can Diagnose Contrast Media Hypersensitivity

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) to iodinated contrast media (ICM), skin tests can be helpful for diagnosis, according to a meta-analysis published online Feb. 3 in Allergy.

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Abnormalities on MRI Predict Knee Replacement

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Structural joint damage measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can predict knee replacement in the following year, according to research published in the March issue of Radiology.

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Changes Being Made to Med School Applicant Assessment

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In accordance with the changes in graduate medical education to better prepare doctors for a changing health care system, changes are being made to medical school applicant evaluation, according to an article published Feb. 19 by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Most Cancer Patients Involve Family in Treatment Decisions

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most lung and colorectal cancer patients involve family members in treatment decisions, with substantial variation by race/ethnicity and language, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in Cancer.

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Confidence Gap Between Male and Female Med Students

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Female medical students perform at the same or higher level as men, but they lack confidence compared with men, according to a letter published in the March 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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National Hospital Rating Systems Rarely in Agreement

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- National hospital rating systems are rarely in agreement, according to a study published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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FDA Launches First App to Identify Drug Shortages

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A mobile phone application (app) has been released to identify current drug shortages, resolved shortages, or discontinuations of drug products, according to a press release published by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Correlated Spectroscopy IDs Changes in BRCA1/2 Carriers

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of localized correlated spectroscopy (COSY) shows significant changes in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, according to a study published online March 3 in Radiology.

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Rush University Adds Patient Scores to Doctor Profiles

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Rush University Medical Center's website has started adding the results of patient surveys to individual physician profiles, according to a report published by the medical center.

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Study Challenges Management of Benign Thyroid Nodules

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Benign thyroid nodules are common, and research suggests they don't need to be monitored as closely as current guidelines recommend. The findings were published in the March 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cerebral Blood Flow Could Assist Concussion Prognosis

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study of college football players suggests that cerebral blood flow (CBF) can function as an objective signal for the initial evaluation of a concussion, as well as measuring progress and recovery. The findings were reported online March 2 in JAMA Neurology.

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Hospital Design Has Little Effect on Patient Satisfaction

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital design has little effect on patient satisfaction, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Physician's Briefing