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March 2016 Briefing - Radiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Radiology for March 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Low Lung Cancer Incidence With Negative CT Prevalence Screen

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Participants with a negative low-dose computed tomography (CT) prevalence screen (T0) have lower incidence of lung cancer and lung cancer-specific mortality than all participants with a T0 screen, according to a study published online March 18 in The Lancet Oncology.

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How Can We Fix the Wage Gap Among Female Physicians?

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women doctors can address the gender wage disparity by understanding the reasons why they earn less, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Double Reporting Valid for Reducing Error in Diagnosis

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Double reporting, which refers to the interpretation of radiological investigations by two observers with arbitration and consensus used to settle discordant reports, seems efficacious and cost-effective, especially for mammography, according to a review published online March 21 in the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology.

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Image-Guided Surveillance Beneficial for Head, Neck Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Image-guided surveillance seems beneficial for patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck who have advanced nodal disease, according to a study published online March 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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FDA: Most Powdered Medical Gloves Should Be Banned in U.S.

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants to ban most powdered medical gloves, saying they pose serious health risks to patients and health care providers alike.

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Case Before Supreme Court May Expose Doctors to Large Fines

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A case before a state supreme court could potentially expose physicians to large fines based on a legal technicality relating to what they should have known, rather than what they knew, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Significant Changes in Liver Blood Flow With Prone Positioning

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prone positioning is associated with significant changes in hepatocellular function and cardiac output in healthy volunteers, according to research published online March 7 in Anaesthesia.

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Spending on Prescription Meds Up About 5 Percent in 2015

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Spending on prescription medications for insured Americans increased about 5 percent in 2015, with the increase half of that seen in 2014, the Associated Press reported.

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Disruptive Patients Distract Docs, May Receive Compromised Care

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Disruptive patients may get worse care from physicians, according to a study published online March 7 in BMJ Quality & Safety. The findings aren't definitive because the researchers tested how physicians responded in fictional vignettes, instead of real-life encounters. Still, the results suggest that such patients distract physicians from doing their jobs.

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Mayo Clinic Has Established Model to Help Battle Burnout

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an effort to reduce burnout among physicians, the Mayo Clinic is initiating a model to raise camaraderie and increase collaboration, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Physicians' Contracts Can Affect Patients, Professionalism

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Problematic clauses in physicians' contracts can impact patient care and professionalism, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online March 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Video Game-Based Cognitive Rehab Program Beneficial in MS

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A video game-based cognitive rehabilitation program is associated with changes in thalamocortical functional connectivity (FC) among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study published online March 8 in Radiology.

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Adventitial Cystic Disease Mimics Deep Venous Thrombosis

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adventitial cystic disease of the common femoral vein can be mistaken for deep venous thrombosis, according to a case report published online March 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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MRI More Accurate Than Transient Elastography for NAFLD

MONDAY, March 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements are more accurate than transient elastography (TE) for identifying liver fibrosis and steatosis, according to a study published in the March issue of Gastroenterology.

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SCOTUS: States Can't Force Health Care Data Release

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Supreme Court has ruled against state efforts to collect health care data from insurance plans.

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Spouse Education Level May Impact Choice for Rural Practice

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who are married to a highly-educated spouse are less likely to work in rural underserved areas, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Prostate Cancer Tied to Higher Colorectal Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of colorectal cancer is increased after a diagnosis of prostate cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Cancer.

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IVCF Use Up in Older Patients With Pulmonary Embolism

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The use of inferior vena caval filters (IVCFs) for pulmonary embolism (PE) increased from 1999 through 2010, according to research published in the March 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Physician's Briefing