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October 2015 Briefing - Radiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Radiology for October 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Stewardship Could Improve Appropriate Medical Imaging Use

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stewardship may be a promising approach for improving appropriate use of medical imaging technology, according to a perspective piece published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Increasing Numbers of Med School Applicants, Enrollees

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a 25 percent increase in the number of medical school enrollees since 2002, with the number reaching an all-time high of 20,630 this year, according to a report published online Oct. 22 by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Early CT Scan Impacts Management of Suspected CAP

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomography (CT) findings affect the diagnosis and management of suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Internal Mammary Lymph Nodes ID'd on MRI Likely to Be Benign

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among women with breast cancer and silicone implant reconstruction, internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLNs) identified at implant-protocol breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more likely to be benign than malignant, according to a study published in the November issue of Radiology.

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Nearly 15 Percent of Plans Lack In-Network Specialists

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of federal marketplace plans lack at least one in-network specialist, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Risk of More Aggressive Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Rises With Age

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is much more likely to be aggressive when discovered in older women, according to a report published online Oct. 27 in Radiology.

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Neuromuscular Stimulation Doesn't Aid Dysphagia Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) does not add benefit to traditional swallow exercises for patients experiencing dysphagia after treatment for head and neck cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in Head & Neck.

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Ultrasound Highly Accurate for Diagnosing Groin Hernia

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound (US) is highly accurate for diagnosing the presence and type of groin hernia, according to a study published in the November/December issue of the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound.

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CRT May Be Preferred Strategy for Elderly With Lung Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is associated with survival benefit over chemotherapy (CT) alone for elderly patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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ACS: Annual Mammograms Should Start at Age 45

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Cancer Society is delaying the recommended age when a woman should start receiving annual mammograms, based on new research that shows the average risk for breast cancer increases near menopause. The new guidelines are published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Age Affects Left Ventricle Differently in Men, Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Age-related changes to the mass and volume of the left ventricle (LV) occur differently in men and women, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Radiology.

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Not All Large Breast Tumors Warrant Mastectomy

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of breast conservation surgery and radiation is as effective as breast removal for some women with large, localized invasive breast tumors, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Cancer.

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Treatment Patterns for DCIS Shift From 1991 to 2010

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There were substantial shifts in treatment patterns for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) from 1991 to 2010, with more women opting for lumpectomy and radiation therapy rather than single mastectomy, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Some Changes Seen in Line With 'Choosing Wisely' Initiative

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significant decreases in low-value services were seen in accordance with two of seven early "Choosing Wisely" recommendations, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Advanced-Stage Breast CA More Likely in Certain Racial Groups

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women in certain racial/ethnic groups are more likely to be diagnosed with more advanced breast cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Hospital Factors Can Overcome 'Weekend Effect'

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More nurses and electronic medical records can help hospitals overcome the "weekend effect" (WE) associated with urgent general surgery procedures performed on weekends, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Surgery.

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Americans Spend More on Health Care, but Fare Worse

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When compared to 12 other industrialized nations, Americans spend more on health care services, but they fare worst in terms of life expectancy, according to recent findings from The Commonwealth Fund.

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Two Decision Instruments ID Major Injuries in Blunt Trauma

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two decision instruments (DIs) have high sensitivity for identifying blunt trauma patients with clinically significant thoracic injuries, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in PLOS Medicine.

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Most Cancer Patients Believe Surgery Will Be Curative

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients undergoing surgery for lung or colorectal cancer believe that the surgery is likely to be curative, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of Cancer.

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Early Detection Still Key to Breast Cancer Survival

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even with recent strides in breast cancer treatment, a woman's chances of surviving the disease still partly depend on early detection, according to research published online Oct. 6 in The BMJ.

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Ultrasound Diagnosis of Fetal Teratoma Very Accurate

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasonography (US) has very high sensitivity and low false-positive rates in identifying fetal teratoma prenatally, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound.

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3D Modeling Assists Evaluation of Complex Fetal Anatomy

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For the first time, three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has been used in utero to diagnose facial deformity and severity of airway risk with a newborn, according to a report published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Older Adults May Take Longer to Recover From Concussion

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults recover more slowly from concussion than younger patients, according to a small new study published online Oct. 6 in Radiology.

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Guidelines Developed for Managing Conflicts of Interest

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Guidelines International Network has developed principles for disclosure and management of conflicts of interest (COIs) during the clinical practice guideline development process, according to a report published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Researchers Urge Routine Screening for Child Abuse

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The early signs of child abuse among infants and toddlers -- head trauma, rib fractures, or abdominal injuries -- are often missed, and that may be due in part to a lack of standardized screening, researchers report. The findings were published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Coronary Artery Calcium Score Improves CHD Risk Prediction

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Inclusion of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score improves coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction, while the absence of CAC reclassifies many patients as not eligible for statins, according to two studies published in the Oct. 13 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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High-Dose Hypofractionated RT Palliative in Head, Neck Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with incurable head and neck cancer, high-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) is associated with meaningful palliative effect, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Head & Neck.

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Modified SOAP Ups Student Awareness of Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Modification of the traditional Subjective-Objective-Assessment-Plan (SOAP) presentation to consider value (SOAP-V) can help medical students learn to practice high-value, cost-conscious care, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Providers Must Understand Legal Limits of Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In order to minimize risk when practicing telemedicine, providers should ensure they hold the proper medical licenses, have medical liability insurance coverage, and communicate with patients regarding the potential risks of telemedicine, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Palliative Radiotherapy Often Overused in Stage IV NSCLC

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stage IV nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in the United States often receive more radiation therapy than recommended, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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MRI Effectively Measures Hemochromatosis Iron Burden

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an accurate and safe tool for the detection of low levels of iron overload in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, according to a letter to the editor published online Sept. 11 in the American Journal of Hematology.

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CT Scans for Lung Cancer Result in Few False-Positives

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical intervention for a non-lung cancer diagnosis is rare following low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Strategies Provided for Improving EHR Efficiency

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Several strategies can be implemented in order to better use electronic health records (EHRs) for patient care and efficiency, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Physician's Briefing