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September 2011 Briefing - Radiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Radiology for September 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Spinal MRI Reviewer Accuracy Equal Across Training Levels

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors at multiple levels of training can accurately and efficiently interpret the integrity of the posterior ligamentous complex (PLC) on spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), according to a study published in the August issue of The Spine Journal.

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U.S. Docs Feel They Give More Patient Care Than Required

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many primary care physicians in the United States believe that their patients are receiving too much medical care, and that the pressure to do more than is necessary could be reduced by malpractice reform, adjusting financial incentives, and spending more time with patients, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Bigger Osteophyte Size Ups Severe Cartilage Damage Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-diagnosed tibiofemoral osteoarthritis, the likelihood of severe cartilage damage increases with increasing osteophyte size, and only a small proportion of knees exhibit atrophic and hypertrophic phenotypes, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Vitamin B12 Markers Tied to Cognition, Brain Volume

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Serum vitamin B12 markers are associated with total brain volume and global cognitive function, with homocysteine affecting global cognitive performance and methylmalonate affecting total brain volume, according to a study published in the Sept. 27 issue of Neurology.

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Reasons for Referral to Specific Docs Differ Among Physicians

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians (PCPs) and medical and surgical specialists differ in their reasons for selecting specific colleagues for referrals, with PCPs more concerned about physician communication and medical record sharing than specialists, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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MRI-Induced Nystagmus Linked to Labyrinthine Function

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with intact labyrinthine function experience nystagmus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in Current Biology.

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Study Compares Great Saphenous Vein Insufficiency Therapies

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Endovenous laser treatment (EVLT) and high ligation and stripping (HLS) are equally safe and effective in treating great saphenous vein (GSV) insufficiency, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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Mortality Up in Hospitals With More Minority Trauma Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of in-hospital mortality for trauma patients are associated with the proportion of minority patients in the hospital, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Work Intensity Similar Across Physician Specialties

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The level of physician work intensity appears to be similar among specialties, with variations in the specific dimensions of stress, physical demands, performance, and temporal demand, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Medical Care.

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Racial Disparities in Radical Prostatectomy Decreasing

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The racial disparity in the utilization rates of minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) in the United States is decreasing, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Cancer.

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Increased Basal Ganglia Gray Matter in Rheumatoid Arthritis

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have increased gray matter in the basal ganglia, especially in the nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus, but not changes in the cortical gray matter, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Optimal CRC Screening Varies With Age, Family History

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The optimal colonoscopy screening strategy for individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) varies considerably with the number of affected first-degree relatives and their age at diagnosis, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of Cancer.

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Statins After Ischemic Stroke Not Tied to Brain Hemorrhage

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to statins after acute ischemic stroke is not associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Optic Radiation Delineated by Tractography During Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Optic radiation during anterior temporal lobe resection (ATLR) for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can be delineated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, and propagated onto postoperative images during neurosurgery, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Mammography Screening Ups Breast Cancer Surgery Rates

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The annual rate of breast surgery increased significantly from 1993-1995 to 2005-2008 for women in Norway aged 50 to 69 years who were invited to undergo mammography screening, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in BMJ.

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Aortic Dissection Incidence Higher in Individuals With BAV

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Aortic dissection incidence is higher in individuals with bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) than in the general population, according to a study published in the Sept. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Abnormal Hippocampal Blood Flow Persists in Gulf War Vets

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For Gulf War veterans with specific syndromes, abnormal hippocampal blood flow persists, and in some cases worsens, 11 years after initial testing, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in Radiology.

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Dalcetrapib Use Safe, Possibly Beneficial in Atherosclerosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Dalcetrapib is safe and reduces change in total vessel area and most-diseased-segment target-to-background ratio (TBR) as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT), according to a study published online Sept. 12 in The Lancet.

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Ureteral Access Sheaths Safe in Urothelial Carcinoma

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Ureteral access sheaths (UASs) are safe for use in the diagnosis and treatment of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC), facilitate acquisition of multiple biopsy specimens adequate for histopathologic evaluation, and minimize the need for repeat diagnostic procedures, according to a study published in the September issue of Urology.

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Cam-Type Deformities Linked to MRI-Detected Hip Damage

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In young asymptomatic males, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects cam-type deformities associated with labral lesions, impingement pits, and labral deformities, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Low-Dose CT Feasible for Measuring Lung Nodules

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose computed tomography (CT) is feasible for detecting lung nodules with CT reader sensitivity affected more by nodule density and volume than CT dose, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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MRI Identifies Brain Region Differences in Autism

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The brains of children with autism exhibit different structural organization in multiple regions, which can be distinguished using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in Biological Psychiatry.

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64-MDCT Improves Radiologic Workflow in Mass Casualties

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The implementation of an emergency radiology protocol using a modern 64-multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner coupled with volume image reading during a mass casualty incident improves radiologic workflow, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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Arterial Calcification Tied to Vascular Brain Disease

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Arterial calcification in various vessel beds is associated with larger white matter lesion (WML) volume and the presence of cerebral infarcts, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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Many Hospital Staff Uniforms Contaminated With Bacteria

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- More than 60 percent of hospital staff uniforms are contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria, including drug-resistant species, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Odds of Board Certification Vary in New Doctors

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Certification of recent U.S. medical school graduates by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) varies across specialties by educational and demographic factors, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Medical Students Show Racial, Cultural Patient Preference

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students may have a preferential bias toward whites and wealthier patients, but this does not appear to influence their clinical decision making or physician-patient interactions, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cerebrovascular Pathologies Tied to Mild Parkinsonian Signs

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Cerebrovascular pathologies, such as macroscopic infarcts, microinfarcts, and arteriolosclerosis, are associated with mild parkinsonian signs in old age, particularly parkinsonian gait, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Stroke.

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MRI Tumor Assessment Predicts Rectal Cancer Survival

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of tumor regression grade (TRG) and circumferential resection margin (CRM) can be used to predict survival for good and poor responders in rectal cancer, according to a study published online Aug. 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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NPe6 May Beat Photofrin Photodynamic Therapy in Lung CA

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- NPe6-photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a better treatment for patients with lung cancer than photofrin-PDT, and the efficacy of PDT may improve based on individual expression status of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and breast cancer-resistant protein (BCRP), according to a study published online Aug. 23 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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