Estrogen Levels May Predict Knee Osteoarthritis

Higher risk found in women with lower levels of serum estradiol and urinary 2-hydroxyestrone

WEDNESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- In middle-aged women, lower baseline levels of serum estradiol and urinary 2-hydroxyestrone may be associated with an increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis, according to a study published online July 26 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

MaryFran R. Sowers, Ph.D., of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues studied 842 middle-aged black and white women from the Southeast Michigan Arthritis Cohort.

The researchers found that women who developed knee osteoarthritis were significantly more likely to have had estradiol concentrations in the lowest tertile (odds ratio, 1.88) compared to those in the middle tertile. They also found that women who developed knee osteoarthritis were significantly more likely to have had 2-hydroxyestrone concentrations in the lowest tertile (OR, 2.9) compared to those with concentrations in the middle tertile.

"If findings are confirmed, then this helps motivate new areas of investigation for intervention," the authors conclude. "If the mechanistic explanation for 2-hydroxyestrone levels lies, at least in part, in arachidonic acid metabolism associated with pain and inflammation rather than receptor binding, then considering alternative lifestyle and therapeutic pathways to influence these metabolites becomes increasingly viable."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician's Briefing