Health Tip: One of Three Adults Gets Shingles

It's the same virus that causes chickenpox in kids

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(HealthDay News) -- Adults 60 and older should be vaccinated for shingles, a very painful rash that's triggered by the same virus that causes chickenpox, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

If you had chickenpox when you were younger, the vacicella-zoster virus may be lying inactive inside you and could trigger a nasty case of shingles. Symptoms of shingles include a blistery rash, itching, fatigue and fever.

The best way to prevent shingles is to be vaccinated, the CDC says. People who have had shingles compare the pain to childbirth or having a kidney stone.

Talk to your doctor about getting vaccinated. If you have the contagious disease, let others know about it, especially if someone you come in contact with has a compromised immune system.

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