Blood Pressure Is Focus of New Web Site

Advice for seniors details risk factors and prevention of the 'silent killer'

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SATURDAY, Sept. 30, 2006 (HealthDay News) -- The NIHSeniorHealth Web site (www.NIHSeniorHealth.gov) now features updated information on high blood pressure, according to the U.S. National Institute on Aging.

The new high blood pressure topic on the site contains information about the prevention, detection, and treatment of high blood pressure. The site was designed especially for older adults by the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine, which are part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

High blood pressure is often called the "silent killer" because most people are not aware they have it. But while it usually does not cause symptoms, high blood pressure can lead to stroke, heart disease, kidney failure, and other health problems.

"High blood pressure is not a normal part of aging," said Dr. Elizabeth G. Nabel, director of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, which developed the content for the site.

"You can prevent high blood pressure by maintaining a healthy weight; being physically active every day; eating more fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy foods; cutting down on salt and sodium; and drinking less alcohol" Nabel said. "If you have high blood pressure, you can lower it by making these lifestyle changes and, if needed, by taking medicine."

More information

The NIHSeniorHealth Web site has more about high blood pressure.

SOURCES: NIA, news release, Sept. 20, 2006

Krisha McCoy

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