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Raloxifene Safe for Women With Decreased Kidney Function

Osteoporosis drug promoted bone density, reduction in fractures, study finds

WEDNESDAY, April 9, 2008 (HealthDay News) -- The osteoporosis drug raloxifene is safe and effective for women with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), a condition that increases osteoporosis risk, according to a new study.

The use of osteoporosis drugs in women with CKD has been controversial because it wasn't known if the drugs were safe for these women.

In this study, Dr. Areef Ishani, of the Minneapolis VA Medical Center and University of Minnesota, and colleagues analyzed data on 7,705 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis who took part in the Multiple Outcomes of Raloxifene Evaluation (MORE) trial.

The authors examined raloxifene effects over three years on the rate of bone mineral density, incidence of fractures, and adverse effects in women with and without CKD. They found that women with and without CKD had a greater increase in spine bone mineral density and a reduction in vertebral fractures than women taking a placebo. Women taking the drug -- especially those with mild to moderate CKD -- also had increased hip bone mineral density.

The findings were published online Wednesday and were expected to be published in the July print issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

The study authors said their findings have significant clinical relevance, because many postmenopausal women have unidentified CKD. This study shows that raloxifene is safe and effective in women with decreased kidney function, information that will help doctors provide better care for these patients.

The study was released during National Women's Health Week, which includes initiatives to encourage women to make their health a top priority and to take steps to have a longer, healthier and happier life. The ways they can achieve this include physical activity, nutritious diet and preventive health screenings, such as bone density tests.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about chronic kidney disease.

SOURCE: American Society of Nephrology, news release, April 9, 2008
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