Weight Training With Arthritis

Stronger muscles can ease the pain

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(HealthDayNews) -- If you have arthritis, weight training can strengthen the muscles that cushion sore joints, according to Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center. Stronger muscles mean less pressure on the joints, and therefore less pain.

Here are sample exercises:

  • For knees, wear an ankle weight on each leg while seated in a chair. Slowly raise one leg for four counts, until the leg is fully extended. Bring the leg back down in four counts. Do this 12 times on each leg, rest 30 seconds, then repeat.
  • For hips, wear an ankle weight on each leg while lying on your side. Lift your leg slowly for four counts until it's at a 45-degree angle, then bring it back down in four counts. Do this 12 times on each leg, rest 30 seconds, then repeat.
  • For wrists and hands, hold a weight while sitting at a narrow table, with your hands dangling over the edge, palms down. With your arms flat on the tabletop, use your wrists to lift the weight slowly in four counts, then bring it back down in four counts. Do this 12 times with each wrist, rest 30 seconds, then repeat.

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