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Health Tip: Recognize Signs of Sleep Deficiency

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(HealthDay News) -- You probably have sleep deficiency if you don't get enough sleep in general, you sleep at the wrong time of day or you don't fall asleep normally or stay asleep, the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute says.

The agency says you may be sleep deficient if you often doze off while:

  • Reading or watching TV.
  • Sitting n a public place, such as a movie theater, meeting or classroom.
  • Riding in a car.
  • Talking to someone.
  • Sitting quietly after eating.

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