August 2006 Briefing - Surgery

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for August 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Subclinical Inguinal Hernias Up Risk for RPRIH

MONDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Subclinical inguinal hernias may predict the development of radical prostatectomy-related inguinal hernia (RPRIH) within a year of undergoing surgery, and patients with these subclinical hernias should undergo hernia repair surgery during prostatectomy, according to research in the August issue of Urology.

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Botox Injections May Reduce Facial Scarring

FRIDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Botox may enhance facial wound healing and improve the appearance of scars, according to the results of a study published in the August issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Plastic Surgery Clinical Trial Reporting Needs Improvement

FRIDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The quantity and variety of plastic surgery randomized clinical trials is increasing and greater awareness of the CONsolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement could improve trial quality, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery.

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Excision of Apocrine Glands Treats Axillary Osmidrosis

FRIDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Subdermal excision of apocrine glands is a highly effective treatment for axillary osmidrosis -- excessive malodor in the axillary area, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery.

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PSA Can Predict Benefit From Radical Prostatectomy

THURSDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In men with high-grade prostate cancer, prostate specific antigen (PSA) values and percent positive biopsy cores may predict who is most likely to benefit from radical prostatectomy, according to a study in the August issue of Urology.

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Liver, Kidney Transplant Best for Dual-Organ Disease

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Combined liver and kidney transplant benefits patients with dual-organ disease, including those with hepatorenal syndrome who have been receiving dialysis for more than two months, according to a study in the August issue of Archives of Surgery.

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Support Surfaces, Supplements May Prevent Bed Sores

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Use of support surfaces, repositioning patients, optimizing nutritional status and moisturizing sacral skin may be appropriate strategies to prevent pressure ulcers, according to the results of a systematic review published in the Aug. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Closes North Carolina Tissue Recovery Firm

TUESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has ordered human tissue-recovery firm Donor Referral Services (DRS), of Raleigh, N.C., and its owner, Philip Guyett, to cease operations with immediate effect.

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Study Finds 8 Percent Rupture Rate for Breast Implants

TUESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than 10 percent of Inamed brand silicone implants ruptured over an 11-year period, according to a company-funded study published in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Hyperbaric Oxygen Improves Nerve Damage Recovery

MONDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Hyperbaric oxygenation may improve recovery of peripheral nerves after traumatic damage and microsurgical repair, according to a study in animals published in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Bupivacaine Blocks Digital Nerve for Nearly 25 Hours

THURSDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Bupivacaine provides digital nerve blockade for approximately 25 hours, significantly longer than lidocaine alone or with epinephrine, according to a report in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Infusion Reduces Alcoholics' Postoperative Pneumonia Risk

THURSDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- In long-term alcoholics, an infusion of low-dose ethanol, morphine or ketoconazole begun prior to cancer surgery of the aerodigestive tract may significantly reduce the risk of postoperative pneumonia, according to a study published in the Aug. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Socioeconomic Status Linked to Late-Life Disability

THURSDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- While the link between extreme poverty and poor health has long been recognized, a new report in the Aug. 17 New England Journal of Medicine extends the socioeconomic disparity to functional limitation and disability later in life.

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Most ED Patients with S. Aureus Infection Have MRSA

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, is the most common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections in patients presenting to emergency departments in 11 U.S. cities, according to a study conducted in August 2004 and reported in the Aug. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Lower Overall Mortality Seen in Breast-Implant Patients

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Women with breast implants have lower overall mortality but higher suicide rates compared to the general population, according to the results of a study published in the Aug. 15 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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Early Prostate Cancer Detection Linked to Overtreatment

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Men in the United States with early-stage prostate cancer are often subjected to unnecessary prostatectomy and radiation therapy in place of more appropriate care such as expectant management, according to a study published Aug. 16 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Doctors' Views on Disclosure of Errors Varies Widely

TUESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- There is a wide variation across the medical profession when it comes to disclosing medical errors to patients, with the visibility of the error and medical specialty both playing a role, according to two studies in the August 14/28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Effect of Financial Incentives on Quality of Care Unclear

TUESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Studies examining the effect of financial incentives on quality of health care have shown mixed results, and ongoing monitoring of these programs is essential to determine their effectiveness, according to a report in the Aug. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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'Funnel Chest' Surgery Improves Heart Function

FRIDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to suggestions that the repair of the pectus excavatum -- or "funnel chest" -- should be considered cosmetic surgery that results in minimal physiologic improvement, the procedure significantly improves cardiovascular function, according to a report in the August issue of Chest.

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Nursing Home Residents at Risk for Surgical Site Infection

FRIDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients who reside in nursing homes are more than four times as likely as those who don't to develop surgical site infections following orthopaedic surgery, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Laser Therapy May Benefit Women with Polycystic Ovaries

THURSDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Transvaginal ultrasound-guided ovarian interstitial laser-coagulation treatment may stimulate ovulation and improve pregnancy rates in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), according to the results of a small study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Advancing Age Linked to Rotator Cuff Tears

THURSDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing age is associated with the development of either partial or full-thickness rotator cuff tears, and patients who present with symptomatic unilateral rotator cuff disease often have bilateral disease, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Cardiorespiratory Fitness Affects Bariatric Surgery

THURSDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In obese patients who undergo bariatric surgery, a low level of cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with an increased risk of post-surgical complications that include stroke, renal failure and death, according to research published in the August issue of Chest.

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Endometriosis Recurrence Higher If Disease Site Deep

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of recurrence after surgery for endometriosis is higher if the disease site is deep, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Exercise Is As Effective As Surgery for Jumper's Knee

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee), open patellar tenotomy is no more effective than eccentric strength training, according to a study published in the August issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The findings suggest that eccentric training should be tried before resorting to surgery.

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Time of Day Affects Outcomes from Anesthesia

THURSDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Anesthesia for surgery conducted in the afternoon is more likely to result in adverse events than operations performed in the morning, according to a study in the August issue of Quality and Safety in Health Care.

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Dead Donors Are a Source of Transplantable Kidneys

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The graft survival rates of transplanted kidneys from donors who died due to an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are as good as those from heart-beating kidney donors who are younger than age 60, according to a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Higher Blood Pressure Seen in Kidney Donors

TUESDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney donors may experience a higher blood pressure increase in the five to 10 years following donation than would be expected with normal aging, according to a meta-analysis published in the Aug. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Physician's Briefing