January 2009 Briefing - Surgery

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for January 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Americans Face Soaring Health Insurance Premiums

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Health insurance premiums in America will double by 2016 unless there are major health care reforms, according to a report titled Health Care in Crisis: How Special Interests Could Double Health Costs and How We Can Stop It, published Jan. 28 by the Public Interest Research Group.

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US Outpatient Surgeries Increasingly Common

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Outpatient surgery visits are rising in the United States, with the number increasing from 20.8 million in 1996 to 34.7 million in 2006. They now account for nearly two-thirds of all surgery visits compared to about half of all surgery visits in 1996, according to a report issued Jan. 28 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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In-Flight Medical Emergencies Poorly Documented

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the fact that the airline industry is nationally and internationally regulated, there is no standardized documentation of in-flight medical emergencies, according to a report published Jan. 20 in the open access journal Critical Care.

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FX06 Cuts Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Injury

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to treat acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), using intravenous FX06, a fibrin-derived naturally occurring peptide, significantly reduces the necrotic core zone, but does not change scar size or troponin I levels, according to study findings published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Measles Virus May Lead to New Prostate Cancer Treatment

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A measles virus strain engineered to express the human carcinoembryonic antigen shows promise in the treatment of prostate cancer, according to research published in the January issue of The Prostate.

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New Guidelines for Opioid-Linked Respiratory Depression

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Updated guidelines for the prevention, detection and treatment of respiratory depression associated with neuraxial opioids have been published in the February issue of Anesthesiology.

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Long-Term Outcomes Favorable in Kidney Donors

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney donors are likely to enjoy excellent long-term health outcomes, with rates of survival, albuminuria and hypertension similar to those of non-donors, a preserved glomerular filtration rate, and no increased risk of end-stage renal disease, according to study findings published in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Keeping Ovaries Safe in Some Endometrial Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Premenopausal women with early-stage endometrial cancer do not have higher odds of five-year survival if they undergo oophorectomy in addition to hysterectomy, according to study findings published online Jan. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Low Mammogram Rates Among Pediatric Cancer Survivors

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Despite recommended guidelines, a number of women who received chest radiation for a childhood cancer have not had mammography screening for breast cancer in the previous two years, according to the results of a study published in the Jan. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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AHA Supports Omega-6 for Possible Heart Protection

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association recommends that at least 5 to 10 percent of individuals' calories should come from omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, according to a science advisory published online Jan. 26 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Clinical Information Technology Leads to Safer Hospitals

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that make use of clinical information technology to automate notes, records, order entry and clinical decision support have lower mortality rates, fewer complications and also save money, according to a report published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Predictors of Contralateral Breast Cancer Identified

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In unilateral breast cancer patients, evaluating five-year Gail risk and histologic findings in the ipsilateral breast may predict the risk of developing cancer in the other breast and help clinicians decide whether or not to perform a contralateral prophylactic mastectomy, according to an article published online Jan. 26 in Cancer.

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Nomograms May Help Predict Kidney Transplant Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A set of nomograms may be helpful in predicting renal function and graft survival in living donor kidney transplantation, according to research published online Jan. 23 in the Journal of Urology.

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Meditation Practice Linked to Less Pain Sensitivity

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Experience in Zen meditation is associated with reduced pain sensitivity, a finding supporting the value of mindfulness-based meditation, according to research published in the January issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.

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AHA Reveals Top 10 Heart Disease Research Advances

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association (AHA) has released its annual top 10 list of advances in research into heart disease and stroke, with a study on the impact of smoke-free legislation on hospitalizations for acute coronary syndrome topping the list.

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Teenage Obesity Linked to Poor Maternal-Fetal Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obesity in teenage mothers is associated with an increased risk for adverse perinatal outcomes, according to research published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Seat Belt, Air Bag Protect Against Spinal Fracture

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Although the occurrence of spinal fractures among drivers and front-seat passengers in motor vehicle crashes has increased despite increases in seat belt and air bag use, their combined use is protective against spinal fractures, according to study findings published in the February issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine.

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New Guidelines Issued for Brain Hemorrhage Management

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- New recommendations summarize the best available evidence for treatment of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and identify areas of future research, according to a statement published online Jan. 22 in Stroke.

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Declaration on Medics' Role in Torture Needs Updating

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the fact that the Declaration of Tokyo condemns the participation of medical personnel in torture and inhumane treatment, there are key areas in which the declaration should be strengthened, according to an article published in the Jan. 24 issue of The Lancet.

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Parathyroid Hormone Linked to Post-Fusion Benefits

FRIDAY Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Parathyroid hormone (PTH) may hold potential for improving outcomes following spinal fusion, according to research published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

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Calcium Phosphate Cement Not Recommended for Kyphoplasty

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In osteoporotic vertebral body fracture augmentation, calcium phosphate cement may not be a suitable replacement for polymethylmethacrylate because its use is associated with a higher risk of cement failure and subsequent loss of correction, according to study findings published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

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Novel Laser Technique to Treat Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw may be effectively treated by a laser bone ablation technique, according to research published in the January issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Novel Light Imaging Technique Detects Melanoma

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Multimodal polarized light imaging using tetracycline or methylene blue is an effective strategy to image dysplastic and benign nevi in melanoma, researchers report in the January issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Disc Prosthesis Shows Efficacy in Cervical Disease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with single-level cervical disc disease, arthroplasty with a cervical disc prosthesis appears to be a reasonable alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, according to research published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

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CO2 Laser Effective for Oral Precancerous Lesions

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser surgery is an effective treatment strategy for oral precancerous lesions, resulting in up to a 64 percent disease-free clinical outcome, according to research published in the January issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Blacks Less Likely Than Whites to Have Lung Cancer Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with lung cancer, black patients are less likely than white patients to undergo recommended lung resection, but the disparity in treatment does not appear to have an impact on outcomes, according to research published in the January issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Endoluminal Therapies Effective for Treatment of GERD

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Endoluminal therapies, including full-thickness plication and endoscopic radiofrequency, provide symptomatic relief and lead to reduced reliance on proton pump inhibitor drugs in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to research published in the January issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Pediatric MRSA Infections Increase Alarmingly

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The nationwide prevalence of pediatric methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) head and neck infections grew 16.3 percent between 2001 and 2006, according to a study published in the January issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

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Facial Injury Patterns Indicate Types of Violence

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A particular pattern of facial injury in women, including periorbital injuries and intracranial injuries, is indicative of intimate partner violence, allowing medical professionals to more easily identify victims of abuse, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Engineered Skin Improves Healing of Burn Wounds

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Tissue-engineered skin made from stem cells improves wound healing in a pig burn model, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in Artificial Organs.

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Laparoscopic Pyloromyotomy Benefits Infants Most

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Both open and laparoscopic pyloromyotomy are safe and effective in treating pyloric stenosis in infants, although infants undergoing laparoscopy achieve full enteral feeding faster and have shorter hospital stays, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in The Lancet.

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Surgery Lowers Cancer Risk Linked to Gene Mutations

THURSDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO), the removal of an ovary together with the fallopian tube, is strongly linked to reducing the risk of breast and gynecologic cancers, according to a report published online Jan. 13 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Axxess Stents Effective for Coronary Bifurcation Lesions

THURSDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The Axxess self-expanding, drug-eluting stent is safe and effective in treating coronary bifurcation lesions, according to the results of a study published online Jan. 14 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Presumed Consent Can't Fully Explain Rise in Organ Donation

THURSDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Although presumed consent may play an important role in an increased rate of organ donation, other factors may also have an impact, according to research published online Jan. 14 in BMJ.

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Post-G8 Work Focuses on Strengthening Health Systems

THURSDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In an atmosphere that emphasizes the strengthening of health systems rather than disease-specific approaches, some efforts growing out of the 2008 G8 summit in Toyako, Japan, have focused on health work force, health finance and health information, according to a policy review published online Jan. 15 in The Lancet.

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Surgical Checklist Slashes Complications, Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Using a 19-item checklist can significantly reduce the rates of death and complications as a result of surgery, according to a report published online Jan. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ventricular Devices Increase Post-Transplant Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Ventricular assist devices (VADs) used as a bridge to heart transplantation increase post-transplant mortality, researchers report in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Study Finds Heparin Complication Rate Lower than Reported

FRIDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage who are treated with heparin may not be at higher risk of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II (HIT II) than those treated with enoxaparin, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery.

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Health Care Another Victim of Gaza Blockade

FRIDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The widespread erosion of human rights in the Palestinian West Bank and Gaza strip is denying Palestinians access to basic health care and preventing medical schools from functioning properly, according to correspondence published online Jan. 9 in The Lancet.

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Age Affects Women's Access to Donated Kidneys

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Women's access to renal transplantation is affected by their age and comorbidities, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Model Demonstrates Ability to Predict Aneurysm Rupture

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A model of aneurysm rupture derived from measuring hundreds of aneurysms showed good accuracy in identifying the rupture status of another cohort of patients, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery.

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Surgery Safe for Patients with Spinal Cord Syndrome

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery rather than conservative treatment safely improves motor function in patients with traumatic central cord syndrome, with most patients reporting satisfaction with their final symptoms, according to an article in the January issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine.

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Fewer Than 200 Pediatric Neurosurgeons in US

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than 200 neurosurgeons in the United States are currently focused on pediatric neurosurgery, with pediatric neurosurgeons more likely to be women, in academic practice, frequently on-call and have fewer financial motivators, according to study findings published in the January issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.

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Hyperbaric Oxygen Effective for Spinal Infection

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is effective in treating bacterial spinal osteomyelitis resistant to antibiotics or that developed after spinal surgery in patients at risk for poor healing, researchers report in the January issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine.

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Lancet Lambastes U.N.'s Inability to Protect Innocents

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The current conflict between Israel and Hamas in Gaza highlights the United Nations' continuing failure to protect innocent civilians in war-torn regions, according to an editorial published online Jan. 7 in The Lancet.

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Statins Reduce Delirium Risk After Cardiac Surgery

TUESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Statin treatment before cardiac bypass surgery reduces the risk of postoperative delirium, particularly in elderly patients, according to a report in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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Total Hip Arthroplasty Revision Becoming More Common

MONDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Revision total hip arthroplasty procedures are becoming more common in the United States, and hip instability and mechanical loosening are leading reasons for them, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Perfused Donor Kidneys Tied to Better Transplant Outcomes

THURSDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Donor kidneys treated by hypothermic machine perfusion rather than static cold storage are less likely to undergo delayed graft function and are more likely to survive a year after transplantation, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physician's Briefing