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January 2015 Briefing - Surgery

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for January 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

VTE Risk Up in Older Women Post-Autologous Reconstruction

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While the overall risk of complications from breast reconstruction after mastectomy does not appear to differ significantly between age groups, the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is higher for older women undergoing autologous reconstruction. The findings were published in the February issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Decreasing Serum Sodium Ups Liver Transplant Survival

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For liver transplantation (LT) recipients with model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores above 11, survival benefit increases with decreasing serum sodium values, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in Liver Transplantation.

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PDE-5 Inhibitors Tied to Prostate Cancer Biochemical Recurrence

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor use after radical prostatectomy is associated with increased risk of biochemical recurrence, according to a study published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Call for Deepened Support of Solid-Organ Transplants

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Organ transplants have saved more than two million life-years in the United States over 25 years, new research shows. But fewer than half of the people who needed a transplant in that time period got one, according to a report published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Surgery.

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Benefits Package Important for Attracting, Retaining Staff

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An appropriately-targeted benefits package is crucial for attracting and retaining employees, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Core Needle Biopsy Helpful With Cervical Lymphadenopathy

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Core needle biopsy (CNB) is a more sensitive tool than fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) for cervical lymphadenopathy evaluation, according to a study published in the February issue of Head & Neck.

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Morphine Linked With Adverse Outcomes Post-Tonsillectomy

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of morphine post-tonsillectomy should be limited, as it may be unsafe in certain children, according to a new study published online Jan. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Pre-Op Back Pain, Pain Sensitivity Predict Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Preoperative back pain and individual pain sensitivity can predict postoperative pain following lumbar surgery, according to a study published in the December issue of Pain Medicine.

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Age Doesn't Affect Outcome of Revision Cochlear Implantation

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Age at revision cochlear implantation does not impact post-revision speech perception performance, according to research published online Jan. 22 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

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CDC: Opioid Rx Prevalent in Reproductive-Aged Females

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Too many women of childbearing age take prescription opioids, putting any unborn babies at risk, U.S. health officials said Thursday. The report appears in the Jan. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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More Variation in Costs Than Outcomes of PCI in VA System

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the Veterans Affairs (VA) system, the variation in one-year risk-adjusted mortality is smaller than variation in risk-standardized costs, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Prophylactic Antimicrobials Overused in Urologic Surgery

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Utilization patterns indicate that antimicrobial prophylaxis is overused for urological surgeries in the community practice setting, according to research published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Increased Physical Activity Seen After TKR in Developing World

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients in the developing world, total knee replacement (TKR) increases participation in physical activities in several life domains, according to a study published in the January issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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More Diverticulitis in Areas With Low-UV Light Exposure

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lower ultraviolet (UV) light is associated with increased rate of diverticulitis admissions, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in JAMA Surgery.

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Physicians Rank the Best EHR Systems of 2014

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have ranked electronic health record (EHR) systems based on five key performance areas, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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NSAIDs Up Odds of Anastomotic Leak Post-Colorectal Resection

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing nonelective colorectal resection, postoperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) administration is associated with increased odds of anastomotic leaks, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in JAMA Surgery.

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Acupuncture Viable for Pain Relief After Joint Replacement

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture is a feasible adjunct therapy for short-term postsurgical pain management in total joint replacement, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Pain Medicine.

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Roux-en-Y Surgery Can Reverse Insulin Treatment in T2DM

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) strongly predicts insulin cessation after surgery in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes (I-T2D) patients, independent of weight loss, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Diabetes Care.

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Tonsillectomy May Benefit Tonsillitis-Associated Psoriasis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with recalcitrant psoriasis associated with episodes of tonsillitis, tonsillectomy may be an option that can result in improvement in psoriasis, according to a review published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Collaboration Between Med Students Cuts Diagnostic Errors

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For fourth-year medical students, working collaboratively is associated with a reduction in diagnostic errors, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Docs Should Negotiate Health Care Payer Contracts

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The terms in health care payer contracts are not immutable, and contracts should be negotiated, according to an article published Jan. 9 in Medical Economics.

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Meds/PT May Work As Well As Surgery for Spinal Stenosis

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery and more conservative treatments provide similar long-term outcomes for people with spinal stenosis, according to research published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

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Physicians Hit Barriers in Making Cancer Referrals

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians report encountering barriers when referring cancer patients to specialty care, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Patients Satisfied With Shared Appointments Before Mohs Sx

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patient satisfaction is high for shared medical appointments (SMAs) for preoperative consultation regarding Mohs micrographic surgery, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Epidural Steroid Injections Tied to Small Surgery-Sparing Effect

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with low back pain, epidural steroid injections (ESIs) could reduce the need for surgery, but the evidence is limited, according to research published in the Feb. 1 issue of The Spine Journal.

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Most Docs Work 40 to 60 Hours Per Week

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians work long hours, with most working 40 to 60 hours per week and a considerable proportion working 61 to 80 or more hours per week, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Discectomy-Related Information on Internet Deemed Poor

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Discectomy-related information on the Internet is poor and of variable quality, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

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Four-Times Daily ASA More Effective in Post-CABG Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, four-times daily acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA) seems more effective than once-daily 81 mg or 325 mg ASA, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Defensive Medicine Common Among Surgeons, Radiologists

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Defensive medicine is commonly practiced among surgeons and radiologists in Austria, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Patient-Selected Audio Therapy May Ease Pediatric Post-Op Pain

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Going through a surgery often means postoperative pain for children, but listening to their favorite music might help ease their discomfort, according to a new study published online Jan. 3 in Pediatric Surgery International.

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Fewer Surgeries for Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer U.S. colorectal cancer patients who are diagnosed in the final stages of their disease are having what can often be unnecessary surgery to have the primary tumor removed, researchers report. These patients are also living longer even as the surgery becomes less common, although their general prognosis is not good, according to the study published online Jan. 14 in JAMA Surgery.

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Working Long Hours? Beware Risky Alcohol Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Working long hours may raise the risk for alcohol abuse, according to a new study of more than 300,000 people from 14 countries. The report was published online Jan. 13 in The BMJ.

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Study Examines Trends in Tracheotomy Malpractice Suits

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Malpractice litigation relating to complications from tracheotomies can result in high award amounts, especially in pediatric cases, according to a study published online Dec. 18 in Head & Neck.

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Rationale for Overriding Best Practice Alerts Highly Diverse

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A wide range of physician-reported rationales drive overrides of best practice alerts (BPAs) for blood product transfusions, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Guidelines Presented for Clinical Documentation in 21st Century

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines have been developed for clinical documentation and interrelated issues. The position paper has been published online Jan. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Many Women Receive Unnecessary Hysterectomies

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In many cases, treatments other than hysterectomies could be offered to women with benign gynecologic conditions, according to research published online Dec. 23 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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AMA Reports on How Docs Use Their Free Time

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association recently surveyed physicians to find what activities they pursue when not in the exam room.

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CDC: Occupationally Acquired HIV Now Rare

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Documented occupational acquisition of HIV has now become rare in the United States, according to research published in the Dec. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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High-Risk Scenario Simulation Useful for Surgical Residents

THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An interprofessional simulation of high-risk clinical scenarios is useful for surgical residents, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Surgery.

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Experts Discuss Pros and Cons of Maintenance of Certification

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The pros and cons of the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) are discussed in two articles published in the Jan. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Patients More Satisfied With Autologous Breast Reconstruction

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women undergoing breast reconstruction, autologous reconstruction leads to higher satisfaction than alloplastic reconstruction, although more women require secondary correction, according to a study published in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Article Highlights Top Technology Challenges for 2015

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) audits, meaningful use 2, and the burdens of technology are the top four technological challenges for physicians in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Bariatric Surgery May Extend Life for Severely Obese Adults

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery appears to prolong life for severely obese adults, according to a new study published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CABG Deemed More Effective Than PCI for 2- or 3-Vessel CAD

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with coronary artery disease, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is more effective but more costly than percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Article Highlights Top Management Challenges for 2015

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Considerable challenges are projected to impact practice management in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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More Attention to Cost-Utility Analyses Urged in Spine Care

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More attention to cost-utility analyses (CUA) research and the quality of these studies is needed in spine care, according to the authors of a review published in the Jan. 1 issue of Spine.

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Health Care-Linked Infections Up Costs in Cardiac Surgery

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are strongly linked to hospital costs, length of stay, and readmission, according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Deep Fascia Excision No Help With Cutaneous Melanoma

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Excision of the deep fascia does not improve the outcome of patients with cutaneous melanomas thicker than 2 millimeters, according to a study published in the December issue of the British Journal of Dermatology.

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High Rate of Complications for Medial Thighplasty

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients in the massive weight loss population undergoing medial thighplasty, the rate of complications is high, according to a study published in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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